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Plagiarism in Early Modern England
     

Plagiarism in Early Modern England

by P. Kewes, Paulina Kewes
 

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What Is plagiarism? How was it understood and judged in early modern England? This interdisciplinary study sets out at once to theorize and historicise plagiarism. The first part launches a vigorous debate about the ethical, philosophical, artistic, and legal implications of plagiarism. Individual essays in part two provide historical case studies. Variously centred

Overview

What Is plagiarism? How was it understood and judged in early modern England? This interdisciplinary study sets out at once to theorize and historicise plagiarism. The first part launches a vigorous debate about the ethical, philosophical, artistic, and legal implications of plagiarism. Individual essays in part two provide historical case studies. Variously centred on translations of the Bible, historiography, drama, poetry, dance treatises, sermons, and colonial grammars, the essays show how a nexus of concepts developed between the Renaissance and the early nineteenth century - plagiarism, imitation, forgery, copyright, and intellectual property - and how they have been defined and contested.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

''Plagiarism' has always been a dirty word. Yet what one generation regards as literary theft may, to another, seem legitimate borrowing or adaptation. By modern criteria, Shakespeare was a plagiarist, as was Handel, but their contemporaries did not see it that way. Neither historical relativism nor ex cathedra condemnation is a fitting stance from which to view past practices. This innovative collection of essays reconstructs shifting attitudes to plagiarism in early modern England, and places them within their historical contexts. One of the book's many strengths is the range of perspectives it offers on plagiarism...This landmark volume brings new depth and focus to the study of plagiarism and will remain a fundamental text on the subject for many years to come.' - Robert D. Hume, Evan Pugh Professor of English Literature, Penn State University

'Plagiarism, as these fascinating and thought-provoking essays remind us, is ever more with us as the internet enfolds us all. Its significance may have

changed in different eras, discourses and technologies, but its capacity to

generate controversy never goes away. The strength of Paulina Kewes's admirably focused volume lies in historicising and particularising the issues. By

concentrating on the early modern (1500-1800), and examining instances from

biblical translation, historiography, choreography, sermons and grammar-books, as well as 'literature', the book remains coherent (there is fluid interplay between the essays) and yet does justice to the complexity of this contentious and many-sided subject.' - Professor Richard Dutton, Lancaster University

'Plagiarism as original sin and perennial problem compels our fresh

attention. This book charts a brilliant and original course through classic

and contested arguments. Structured as a conversation between distinguished

and patient protagonists, it is a feast of reason, a true symposium.' - Professor Warwick Gould, Director, Institute of English Studies

'Paulina Kewes, the editor, has selected the contributions with an eye to thematic consistency and, though it may be strange praise for a volume on plagiarism, a commendable concern for originality...Clearly...the spirit of innovation has not yet flown the groves of academe.' - Times Literary Supplement

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780333998410
Publisher:
Palgrave Macmillan UK
Publication date:
12/10/2002
Edition description:
2002
Pages:
276
Product dimensions:
5.51(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.03(d)

Meet the Author

PAUL BAINES Senior Lecturer, Department of English, University of Liverpool
IAN DONALDSON Grace I Professor of English, Cambridge University
BERTRAND A.GOLDGAR Professor of English, Lawrence University
NICK GROOM Senior Lecturer, English Literature, University of Bristol
BREAN S.HAMMOND Professor of English, University of Nottingham
ANDREW HOPE teaches History in Kent
HAROLD LOVE holds a personal chair in English, Monash University, Melbourne
STEPHEN ORGEL Jackson Eli Reynolds Professor in Humanities, Stanford University
BARBARA RAVELHOFER Research Professor, Istituto di Studi Avanzati, University of Bologna
LISA RICHARDSON working on the use and imitation of classical and other literary models in early modern English historiography
CHRISTOPHER RICKS Warren Professor of the Humanities, Boston University and co-director of the Editorial Institute
RICHARD STEADMAN-JONES Lecturer, School of English, Sheffield University
RICHARD TERRY Reader, Eighteenth-Century English Literature, University of Sunderland

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