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Plague Journal
     

Plague Journal

4.1 7
by Michael O'Brien
 

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Plague Journalis Michael O'Brien's third novel in theChildren of the Last Daysseries. The central character is Nathaniel Delaney, the editor of a small-town newspaper, who is about to face the greatest crisis of his life. As the novel begins, ominous events are taking place throughout North America, but little of it surfaces before the public eye.

Overview

Plague Journalis Michael O'Brien's third novel in theChildren of the Last Daysseries. The central character is Nathaniel Delaney, the editor of a small-town newspaper, who is about to face the greatest crisis of his life. As the novel begins, ominous events are taking place throughout North America, but little of it surfaces before the public eye. Set in the not-too-distant future, the story describes a nation that is quietly shifting from a democratic form of government to a form of totalitarianism. Delaney is one of the few voices left in the media who is willing to speak the whole truth about what is happening, and as a result the full force of the government is brought against him.

Thus, seeking to protect his children and to salvage what remains of his life, he makes a choice that will alter the future of each member of his family and many other people. As the story progresses he keeps a journal of observations, recording the day-by-day escalation of events, and analyzing the motives of his political opponents with sometimes scathing frankness. More importantly, he begins to keep a "mental record" that develops into a painful process of self-examination. As his world falls apart, he is compelled to see in greater depth the significance of his own assumptions and compromises, his successes and failures.Plague Journalchronicles the struggle of a thoroughly modern man put to the ultimate spiritual and psychological test, a man who in losing himself finds himself.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780898709810
Publisher:
Ignatius Press
Publication date:
08/28/2003
Pages:
275
Sales rank:
574,601
Product dimensions:
5.00(w) x 7.75(h) x (d)

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Plague Journal 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
EKC More than 1 year ago
This book won't make much sense if you don't read the trilogy starting with Strangers and Soujourners and ending with Eclipse of the Sun. Plague Journal is the second book. The three books are a frightening portrayal of where the Western world is headed as it embraces relativism where nothing is right or wrong, everything is relative, and political correctness allows the government to obtain total control of its citizenry. At first you feel that it can't happen here. Then you realize it has already started! Impossible to put down once you start reading.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If you aare looking for a book of short essays on the evils of socialism and social engineering with parables thrown in, then great book. If looking for an adventure of a falsely accused man on the run from a dictatordhip to save his children, then sorry, look elsewhere. The main character is in just that situation, but spends all of ten minutes thinking of how to protect his kids as he daydreams for hours on the social environment that set them up to be framed. I feel my rating is generous.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Another great book by Michael O'Brien!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
In the apocalyptic genre, this contribution doesn't dwell in the fantastical, but the plausible. The author lays out a scarily possible scenario of the present as the stage for the beginning of the end. It causes a critical appraisal of the present in light of the end. He also demonstrates a tremendous gift for the language and for narrative.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Magnificent wordsmithing. Literate and insightful without pretension. The Plague in the title is the poison of modern culture. O¿Brien does not make the mistakes of refusing to see evil for what it is or of creating a shallow story of man-takes-on-City-Hall-and-wins. Rather he describes the pain and joy of a Christian father¿s struggle against the troubles and traumas of the world as it is. Thought provoking and at the same time hopeful in the best sense of the word.