Plague Year

Plague Year

3.9 34
by Jeff Carlson
     
 

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"Terrifying." --Scott Sigler
"Riveting." --David Brin
"Rock-hard realistic." --James Rollins

The nanotech was intended to save lives. Instead, it killed five billion people, devouring all warm-blooded lifeforms except on the highest mountain peaks.

The safe line is 10,000 feet. Below, there is only death. Above, there is famine and war. Mankind's

Overview

"Terrifying." --Scott Sigler
"Riveting." --David Brin
"Rock-hard realistic." --James Rollins

The nanotech was intended to save lives. Instead, it killed five billion people, devouring all warm-blooded lifeforms except on the highest mountain peaks.

The safe line is 10,000 feet. Below, there is only death. Above, there is famine and war. Mankind's final hope rests with a scientist aboard the International Space Station... and with one man in California who gambles everything on a desperate mission into the ruins of the old world...

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

This tiresome sci-fi thriller debut, set in postapocalyptic California, has an ingenious kickoff that unfortunately goes nowhere fast. Following the accidental release of a deadly nanotechnology (designed to fight cancer), much of the world's population is dead; in the California Sierras, above the plague's high-water mark (10,000 feet), Cameron Najarro, Albert Sawyers and their small group of survivors eke out a desperate living, turning to cannibalism for survival. Meanwhile, in the International Space Station Dr. Ruth Ann Goldman and her team are making progress on a vaccine. Things go bad quickly when Goldman and her team return to Earth to test a hypothesis: first, they crash land in the middle of a civil war, then they find that the military has its own plans for the vaccine. When the astronauts and mountain survivors finally meet up, Goldman is surprised to find valuable allies in Sawyers and Najarro, and the three set off with a few others to find a lost lab that may hold the key to stopping the nano menace. The timely idea may hold readers' interest, but only so far as their patience allows; though well-written, the heroes' lengthy journeys slow the story to a pace almost as tormenting as organ-liquefying micro-machines. (Aug.)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780996082327
Publisher:
JVE
Publication date:
06/27/2015
Pages:
346
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.72(d)

What People are saying about this

James Rollins
"Harrowing."--(James Rollins, New York Times bestselling author of The Judas Strain)
Robert J. Sawyer
"Marvelous."--(Robert J. Sawyer, Hugo and Nebula Award-winning author of Rollback)
David Brin
"One of the best debut novels in years."--(New York Times bestselling author David Brin)
Kevin J. Anderson
"Fascinating."--(Kevin J. Anderson, New York Times bestselling co-author of Hunters of Dune)

Meet the Author

JEFF CARLSON is the international bestselling author of "Plague Year," "Interrupt" and "The Frozen Sky." To date, his work has been translated into sixteen languages worldwide.

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Plague Year (Plague Year Trilogy #1) 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 34 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
After reading Plague Year I went back to B&N that week to get the next two books in the series.
RHS2010 More than 1 year ago
This book, "Plague Year" by Jeff Carlson has to do with a super virus called a nanotech by the people who fear it. So where did this nanotech start and what does it do? Well it started in northern California. The nanotech was a type of anti-virus that was thought to be made for medical nature and work (helpingly) inside the body. And boy does the virus work inside the body. The nanotech only works in warm blooded things like people, mammals, and birds. The reason for this is because the virus is carbon based, so flows through the air, and is breathed in by us. Once in the body of a living thing, the virus rapidly multiplies and burns the inside and out of its host. The good thing about the nanotech is that it burns out (dies) at about ten thousand feet. Because the virus kills people below ten thousand feet, many have been forced to live on mountain tops in order to survive. They live in groups, and are pretty much sitting, waiting for a cure to come from a group of scientists and astronauts in Colorado. Read the ending to find out if anyone survives, or if the last people alive to see another day!
This book is by far interesting, but it reminded me a lot of a movie called ¿I am Legend.¿ Both the book and that movie had to do with something going excessively wrong in the world, and few people living because of a world wide virus that swept through every nation. Even though they were quite similar, I would still say that ¿Plague Year¿ was a very interesting book. I personally really enjoyed this book because Jeff Carlson wrote with a lot of description and details. Because he wrote with so much detail, I could not put his book down. Books like ¿Plague Year¿ are the ones that turn into best sellers because people just want to keep reading. Towards the beginning, ¿Plague Year¿ leaves you kind of confused on how the characters got where they are, but it explains itself slowly. The other part that is hard to understand in the book is all of the characters names. Carlson puts many of the characters just right out there, and I struggled to keep them apart. If Carlson had not described the characters in unique ways, this would have been a hard read, but he did a great job! I would recommend this book to many people who like more, Sci-Fi stories.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I don¿t know why this book is categorized as science fiction. It says its like a Michael Crichton book on the cover and I think it¿s better than anything Michael Crichton ever wrote. State of Fear. Prey. Jurassic Park. All good books. This one¿s better. It¿s totally believable. It¿s scary as hell. Carlson doesn¿t bore you with the science either the way Crichton does sometimes. It¿s what would really happen if the human race got stuck suddenly in the highest mountains. It¿s not a huge book, its 300 pages and a quick read, but it has that ¿epic feel¿ because it goes back and forth over hundreds of miles and into the International Space Station. It also talks about the problems they have in the Andes, Alps, Himalayas and other places. If you¿re looking for an awesome read, this is it. Todd J.
unchartedgalaxies More than 1 year ago
Plague Year is a breath of fresh air to the dystopian genre. Instead of focusing on a corrupted government or an invasion of either zombies and aliens, Jeff Carlson introduces an interesting concept: a plague of nanotechnology. These small robots are too small to see and eat the body from the inside out after one becomes infested. The only way to rid yourself of them is retreating to an elevation of over 10,000 feet. Carlson's characters are relatable, realistic, and fit together nicely, and there is a healthy dose of problems and conflicts throughout the novel. I found many qualities of myself in the characters of Ruth, Cam, and Sawyer. Overall, I thoroughly enjoyed the book and I may continue to finish the series... However, I was very content with the ending and I'm afraid to taint it! I recommend this book, as long as you know your science lingo.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Hands down this whole Series is one of the best Science Fiction ever wrote. All three books are amazing and the story from start to end is edge of your seat.   I had dreams about these for weeks, the image of the people effected always make me think of the classic Scene in Robocop (the orginal) where the man gets acid poured on him (The Melting Man) Buy all three at once cause you will want more
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Really enjoyed this and looking forward to reading the other 2 books in the trilogy.
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It really hasn't gotten my attention to continue reading. I read it when I am waiting in the Dr's office.
drakevaughn More than 1 year ago
Wow. It’s been a while since I’ve been so engrossed in a book. Plague Year started with a bang, capturing my attention like a roller coaster. That’s why it was so disappointing that the latter half of the book seemed to derail. The book revolves around a nanotech contagion that has killed most of the world’s population, forcing the survivors to take refuge up in the mountains. Lacking resources, the survivors have devolved into warring groups of cannibals. I’m always a sucker for these post-apocalyptic tales and adored Carlson’s description of the initial plague. However, the book changes focus from these survivors to the remnants of the US government, now situated atop the Colorado Rockies. I really wanted to enjoy this storyline of the rebels and decaying government, but after the brutal darkness of the first half of the book, it just lacked the same narrative punch. And the contrived ending was likewise a disappointment. Not only that, but it was clearly a set up for the next book in the series. Carlson is a terrific thriller writer, but I felt the book transformed from a spellbinding novel into a movie with a neat and tidy conclusion. Although, it did pique my interest enough to check out the sequel.
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