Plainview lithic technology and late Paleoindian social organization in the western Great Lakes.

Overview

Recognizing potential threats is fundamentally important to emotional well-being and physical survival. However, exaggerated distortions of danger may result for people who already feel vulnerable---for instance, when perceiving insufficient capabilities to deal with the situation at hand. Conversely, people who feel equipped to take on stressful situations may be less likely to perceive potential threats in an exaggerated fashion. Psychosocial resources, such as self-esteem or social support, provide the means ...
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Overview

Recognizing potential threats is fundamentally important to emotional well-being and physical survival. However, exaggerated distortions of danger may result for people who already feel vulnerable---for instance, when perceiving insufficient capabilities to deal with the situation at hand. Conversely, people who feel equipped to take on stressful situations may be less likely to perceive potential threats in an exaggerated fashion. Psychosocial resources, such as self-esteem or social support, provide the means to cope with perceived threats. Therefore people with sufficient resources should perceive threatening objects and events in a less exaggerated manner than people lacking in resources. This research consists of seven studies that test whether resources attenuate exaggerated perception of physically threatening situations. Two initial studies explored whether the perceived distance of a threatening object differed by available resources. Participants with depleted, boosted, or unchanged psychosocial resources estimated the distance of a live tarantula. These studies showed that people with depleted self-worth judged the threatening object as nearer than did those with unchanged self-worth (Study 1), although only indirect evidence was obtained for social support (Study 2). Five subsequent studies investigated whether detection sensitivity to angry human figures differed by available resources. Participants with depleted, boosted, or unchanged psychosocial resources judged the presence or absence of an ambiguous moving figure expressing one of five emotions---angry, happy, sad, fearful, or neutral. Study 4 found that fear impaired visual sensitivity to angry figures. Although Studies 3 and 5 did not demonstrate a main effect of psychosocial resources, internal analyses suggested that resources moderated the relationship between fear and impaired perception of angry figures. Study 6 demonstrated that emotional disclosure about a disturbing experience also moderated this tendency for angry, approaching figures, but mainly for men. In Study 7, disclosing one's emotions about either a disturbing or neutral event was associated with increased detection sensitivity. Taken together, this set of studies demonstrates that psychosocial resources---self-worth, social support, and emotional disclosure---moderate the influence of fear and anxiety on the perception of threatening objects and events.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781243536587
  • Publisher: BiblioLabsII
  • Publication date: 9/3/2011
  • Pages: 370
  • Product dimensions: 7.44 (w) x 9.69 (h) x 0.77 (d)

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