The Planets

The Planets

3.6 3
by Gail Gibbons
     
 

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Best-selling author-illustrator Gail Gibbons explores our solar system's planets in this completely revised, simultaneous paperback edition.

Our solar system is a fascinating place. The planets in it, named in ancient times after Greek and Roman gods and goddesses, are very different from each other in size, shape, orbit, and even weather. An update of Gail… See more details below

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Overview

Best-selling author-illustrator Gail Gibbons explores our solar system's planets in this completely revised, simultaneous paperback edition.

Our solar system is a fascinating place. The planets in it, named in ancient times after Greek and Roman gods and goddesses, are very different from each other in size, shape, orbit, and even weather. An update of Gail Gibbons's popular first two editions, this third edition clearly explains basic information about each planet in our solar system as well as the many new discoveries that have come to light in recent years, such as Pluto's new designation as a dwarf planet.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
The word planet comes from the Greek word for wanderer. That is because the Greeks noticed that there were some "stars" in the sky that move around in the star patterns, or constellations. These objects were not stars at all, but planets. Six planets were visible with the naked eye and discovered by ancient astronomers before the invention of the telescope. In the last 200 years three more planets have been discovered. Each of the nine planets circles around the sun. A year is the amount of time it takes for a planet to move around the sun. A day is the amount of time it takes for a planet to revolve on its axis. Every planet's day and year is unique to that planet. Did you know that Venus's day is longer than its year? Saturn's day is only 11 hours long, but its year is 30 Earth years long. Saturn, Jupiter, Uranus, and Neptune are gas giants. They are made up mostly of gases. They all rotate faster than the Earth despite being much, much larger. Nevertheless, their years are much, much longer. Neptune's year is 164 Earth years. The planets are fun to study and most kids find them fascinating. 2005 (orig. 1993), Holiday House, Ages 5 to 8.
—Kristin Harris
Children's Literature - Beverly Kobrin
An excellent first look at such planet basics as distance from the sun, length of day and year in earth terms, and natural satellites. Ms. Gibbons explains planetary motion, and provides facts in a way that brings them into a child's world with illustrations that are informative and entertaining.
Children's Literature - Carolyn Mott Ford
The clear informative text and appealing illustrations are sure to keep the attention of young readers. They will be drawn in by the pictures of two kids who, along with their parents and friendly looking pooch, are looking up at the stars and planets. Then the readers will find much to learn, beginning with the fact that "The word planet comes from the Greek work meaning �wanderer." The difference between a planet and a star is explained and the number of known planets in our solar system is given. The facts about each planet are presented individually and in a manner easy for readers to grasp, and each planet is shown in illustration. The solar system is also illustrated and the need for a telescope to see some of the planets is explained. Additional information about all the planets is given at the back of the book. This is an excellent aid to young students in understanding the solar system and the planets. Reviewer: Carolyn Mott Ford
School Library Journal

Gr 1-3

In an inexcusably superficial update of the 2005 edition, Gibbons revises her text minimally and leaves the art untouched. Along with leaving her mention of the 2004 Mars Exploration Rover Mission still illustrated only with a view of a '70s-era Viking Lander, she lets Pluto continue to sail along the peripheries of the planetary maps-in an incorrect orbit to boot-and gives it an entire spread. Furthermore, though she properly notes that Pluto is now classified as a dwarf planet, Ceres, which was upgraded at the same time to the same status, gets nary a mention. Despite some intriguing facts ("On Venus, a day is longer than a year, and a year is shorter than a day") and that familiar, instantly recognizable look, this outing has less to offer fledgling readers than such other recent tours as Seymour Simon's Our Solar System (HarperCollins, 2007).-John Peters, New York Public Library

School Library Journal - School Library Journal
K-Gr 2-Aside from minor editorial changes, updated numbers for the moons of the gas giant planets, a rewritten comment about Pluto, and an added line about 2004's Mars Exploration Rover, this title is identical in text and pictures to the 1993 edition. It remains an essential primer on the topic, and should be purchased for all collections in need of fresh copies-but there is not enough new material to warrant wholesale replacement of the previous version.-John Peters, New York Public Library Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780823421572
Publisher:
Holiday House, Inc.
Publication date:
11/20/2007
Edition description:
REV
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
237,568
Product dimensions:
9.98(w) x 7.98(h) x 0.13(d)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

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