Plant Resource Allocation / Edition 1

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Overview

Plants carry on many independent functions simultaneously-they absorb different nutrients, they convert light into stored energy, they grow, and they reproduce. Plants do not perform these function passively. Resources must be apportioned or allocated, according to conflicting schedules and priorities, to each of these and other activities. This book is an exploration of the latest insights into the theory and functioning of plant resource allocation. An international team of ecologists has prepared chapters devoted to the fundamental topics of resource allocation. Anyone interested in plant ecology, physiological ecology, crop science, and related disciplines in plant and environmental sciences will want this important reference.

Audience: Advanced undergraduate, graduate faculty, and researchers in ecology, physiological ecology, plant science, agriculture, and environmental sciences.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"...a timely book, covering a range of approaches to its subject. The book rightly emphasized the potential problems with the optimal allocation approach and its progeny, the cost-benefit analysis of allocation. There is also appropriate emphasis on the possibility that, even if optimal allocation is a major outcome of natural selection, it is not completely expressed because of adaptive or acclimatory constraints. ...a readable, authoritative and stimulating account of an important subject area. The editors are to be congratulated on assembling this volume, and not least for their two excellent 'bookend' chapters."
--TREE
"[The] introductory chapter draws together explicitly the conclusions of the other chapters and even proposes mechamisms by which the phenomena described by the chapter authors may be integrated physiologically by the plant. This is unusual in an edited volume; I wish it were emulated by more editors. The other chapters are generally of high quality, either in terms of ideas or findings. The volume nicely summarizes much of the current state of work and confusion on plant resource allocation. It would provide a good introduction to the field for a graduate student developing a thesis project, or a graduate seminar. The work is presented is often fascinating, and raises interesting questions. Read with an open mind, this book should open some mental doors on exciting frontiers in plant physiological ecology."
--ECOLOGY
Booknews
An international team of ecologists explore the theory and research findings on how plants allocate uptake resources such as carbon dioxide, water, and nutrients; and manufactured products such as sugars, proteins and defensive chemicals, among the several functions they perform simultaneously. Their topics include the fate of acquired carbon, comparing insects and plants, optimality approaches to resource allocation in woody tissues, size-dependent allocation for male and female reproduction, leaf display and growth in fluctuating light environments, and allocation patterns in clonal herbs and their consequences for growth. The 12 studies are revised from presentations at a conference, the date and location of which are not mentioned. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780120834907
  • Publisher: Elsevier Science
  • Publication date: 6/30/1997
  • Series: Physiological Ecology Series
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 303
  • Product dimensions: 0.88 (w) x 6.00 (h) x 9.00 (d)

Table of Contents

F.A. Bazzaz, Allocation of Resources.
H. Poorter and R. Villar, The Fate of Acquired Carbon in Plants.
H. Heilmeier, M. Erhard, and E.-D. Schulze, Biomass Allocation and Water Use under Arid Conditions.
M.Gerber, M.A. Watson, and H. de Kroon, Organ Preformation, Development, and Resource Allocation in Perennial Plants.
R.M. Sibly and J.F.V. Vincent, Optimality Approaches to Resource Allocation in Woody Tissues.
M.J. Hutchings, Resource Allocation Patterns and Their Consequences for Growth.
E.G. Reekie, Tradeoffs between Reproduction and Growth Influence Time of Reproduction.
P.G.L. Klinkhamer and T.J. de Long, Size-Dependent Allocation to Male and Female Reproduction.
D. Ackerly, Allocation, Leaf Display and Growth in Fluctuating Light Environments.
M. Lerdau and J. Gershenzon, Allocation Theory and Chemical Defense.
J. Grace, Towards Models of Resource Allocation by Plants.
Subject Index.
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