Overview

Dominic 'Sherlock' Smith is a devoted fan of the pop group Plastic. He's so devoted to them that it clouds his judgement when it comes to his friend Emma. Then, by chance, he finds himself trapped in a lift with Plastic's lead singer Lisa Voyd...

A romantic comedy for 12+, told from a boy's point of view, from the author of many bestsellers for children including the Saxby Smart books.

"Readers will be drawn in by the fun premise here... Cheshire tells the story in flashbacks, ...

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Plastic Fantastic

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Overview

Dominic 'Sherlock' Smith is a devoted fan of the pop group Plastic. He's so devoted to them that it clouds his judgement when it comes to his friend Emma. Then, by chance, he finds himself trapped in a lift with Plastic's lead singer Lisa Voyd...

A romantic comedy for 12+, told from a boy's point of view, from the author of many bestsellers for children including the Saxby Smart books.

"Readers will be drawn in by the fun premise here... Cheshire tells the story in flashbacks, creating some memorable characters - including Dominic's dotty live-in grandparents - and some terrific scenes... Charming writing here - and sharp insights" - Publishers' Weekly

"Cheshire offers a strong, witty narrative voice" - School Library Journal

"A tightly written and fascinating exploration of fame and real life" - Publishing News UK

"Plastic Fantastic is fun, breezy, and the ultimate read for anyone who has ever been the number one fan. A great read!" - Teensreadtoo.com

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Readers will be drawn in by the fun premise here: Dominic, a fanboy of pop group Plastic, gets trapped in an elevator with the band's "gorgeous, talented, self-assured, powerful, respected" frontwoman. It takes more than two hours to fix, during which time Dominic tries to explain his devotion to the band ("How can a throwaway pop band like Plastic be your whole life? What kind of wasted life are you leading?" challenges the rather blunt singer Lisa Voyd). In doing so, the 15-year-old reveals much about his life, including which girl he should be devoted to. Cheshire (Kissing Vanessa) tells the story in flashbacks, creating some memorable characters-including Dominic's dotty live-in grandparents-and some terrific scenes between Dominic and his obvious soulmate Emma (in one, she locks him up to prevent him from humiliating himself by performing in the school concert as a drag version of Lisa. "You don't look funny at all. You look creepy," she says). While the book succeeds in capturing the intense feelings of fandom, it never builds much momentum. Readers may appreciate Dominic's cluelessness, but his eventual love realization will not shock them. Lisa narrates one chapter (here called "tracks"), and while her entry has energy, her complaints about fame's trappings seem familiar; her own last-minute life change scripted. All in all, there is some charming writing here-and sharp insights-but readers may be disappointed that Dominic's story does not fully deliver on its great beginnings. Ages 12-up. (Mar.) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
School Library Journal
Gr 6-10-Dominic, 15, is obsessed with The Plastics, and he's trapped in an elevator with the band's hot lead singer. In alternating chapters, he narrates a minute-by-minute account of the experience, as well as the backstory leading up to the moment: the path to his obsession, his family problems, and his clueless dealings with a potential love interest. Cheshire offers a strong, witty narrative voice reminiscent of a younger Steve York in Rob Thomas's Rats Saw God (S & S, 1996). The story is set in a suburb of Birmingham, England. The topic-teen pop-star obsessions-is sexy and relevant. However, despite some moments of humor and an effort to capture real emotions behind infatuation, the novel never really gets beneath the surface of its sizable issues. Cheshire's agendas-to reveal how pop stars are actually manipulated and unhappy, and how today's youth are just ignorant of music history-may not sit well with readers. And if they are not exactly offended, they may wonder what any of this has to do with Dom's neglectful parents, and how, really, the singer could decide to change her career after a couple of hours trapped with this increasingly unsympathetic hero. Readers may enjoy watching Dom learn his lesson. More likely, they'll find this exploration of pop music about as punchy and insightful as The Plastics' latest single.-Riva Pollard, The Winsor School Library, Boston Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940044374065
  • Publisher: Simon Cheshire
  • Publication date: 3/12/2013
  • Sold by: Smashwords
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 510 KB

Meet the Author

Simon Cheshire grew up in Warwickshire. He was always the quiet kid at the back of the class, and spent a lot of time staring out of the window.From a young age, he was a dedicated reader and would spend many hours absorbed in books, happily dreaming of faraway places, and completely ignoring his mother's cries of "Go out and get some fresh air, for heaven's sake!"His first book appeared in 1997, and since then his books have been published in many countries around the world, and in several languages. He writes in a tiny room that used to be a walk-in cupboard, but which is now crammed with books, pieces of paper and empty chocolate bar wrappers.His hobbies include movies, repairing old computers and wishing he had more hobbies. He lives in Warwick with his wife and children, although he spends most of his time in a world of his own.Some things you didn't know about Simon Cheshire* He is allergic to animal hair, dust mites and the word 'incredible'.* His favourite food is fish. Or possibly chocolate.* He has no dress sense whatsoever, and usually goes around looking like a mobile rubbish tip.* His favourite activity is reading late at night, when everyone else is asleep.* He writes on a laptop computer running Linux, using LibreOffice to write his books, Weebly to maintain his website and PacMan to waste his time.* He hates gardening, swimming and Christmas.* He believes in the existence of extraterrestrials.* When he was growing up, he wanted to be either an actor or a film director.* He has travelled in China, India and Egypt and really, really wants to go to the Moon.
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Read an Excerpt

Plastic Fantastic


By Simon Cheshire

Random House

Simon Cheshire
All right reserved.

ISBN: 0385732139


Chapter One

TRACK ONE


"There's 32 reasons why I love you
All but four of them are true"


-"32 Reasons," from the Plastic album From Hell It Came
(Voyd/Parkins (c) Cellophane Music Ltd)


12:27 p.m. This is the greatest moment of my life.

I am stuck in a lift with Lisa Voyd.

Me! I, Dominic "Sherlock" Smith, aged fifteen and eight months, of 21 Victoria Crescent, have felt the lift shudder to a halt, have seen the lights on the panel of buttons flicker and go out, and now I am stuck inside with . . .

Lisa! Voyd! THE Lisa Voyd: lyricist, style goddess, lead singer of Plastic. She's standing barely half a meter from me. I think my heart is about to burst with joy! I think my head is about to explode with sheer delight! I think I'm about to hyperventilate!

Calm down, Dominic. Breathe sensibly. Come on, come on, be objective, be rational.
This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. This is what you've always wanted, Dom, me old mate. This is THE moment. It will never come again. It will be over in two minutes, as soon as the lift starts moving again, as soon as they get the power back on. Make the most of it, be cool, and above all make a good impression on her.

"Hallphreeelllblee," I burble. Oh crap, my mouth's stopped working.

She turns and looks at me. Looks at me,properly, for the first time.

"You OK?" she says.

I don't want to burble again. So I nod instead.

"Are you . . . freaked out by lifts or something?"

I shake my head, noooo, no no no, no problem.

Her eyes narrow slightly. Her face now has the exact same expression as in the photograph of her in the May issue of MusicMaker, page seventy-four, top left-hand corner. That exact mix of the quizzical and the exotic. She is the page come to life.
It makes her look even lovelier than usual. She is slightly taller than me, almost six feet, and the chunky-heeled boots she's wearing make her even taller. She seems slimmer in real life, her figure hugged in dark-shaded clothes which couldn't look more expensive if they had This cost a fortune stamped all over them. Black jeans, flappy at the ankle; a thin, military-styled jacket over a regular shirt; a tie, around her neck instead of her collar.

She reaches out once again to stab all the way up the column of lift buttons in turn. Her fingers are long, with neatly clipped nails. They're slightly ragged at the lower edges, though. I think maybe she picks at them.

Her neck is slender, her jawline sharp, her nose a bit more flared than it registers on camera. Her face is broad, kind of angular, and her eyes are the darkest I have ever seen. Science fiction eyes. The hair that's the envy of so many girls is indeed a shining tone of reddish auburn, cut in a straight, short chop-chop style that highlights the exquisite beauty it surrounds. She is six months past her twentieth birthday.

I'm close enough to catch the scent of her shampoo. Even her smell is beauty incarnate.

This person is gorgeous, talented, self-assured, powerful, respected. Everything you could aspire to. Everything I could look for in a woman. Utterly wonderful.

And I am here with her, in this lift that is stuck. For a moment, my eyes shift focus to the glass wall beside her and I see my reflection. There stands Dominic Smith, whose tinted specs make him look dead cool, thank you very much, although the scraggy black hair manages to spoil the effect. My hair stages more uprisings than a nineteenth-century revolutionary. I inherited it from my dad. Thanks, Dad.

But that IS me, reflected in that glass. Tallish, thinnish, borderline gangling. Standing next to her. I can see both of us at once. Both of us, her and me, me and her.

Me and Lisa.

There's movement outside the glass. It suddenly reminds me of what's going on outside. There are feet jostling about just above the level of our heads, and below us a ten-meter drop to the shop floor of Big Deal Records.

You see, the lift has glass walls, and glass doors so you can see the mechanism inside that opens and closes them. Very interesting, actually, I've never seen that before. Only the floor and ceiling aren't see-through. They were lit up from behind when the power was still on, a bright, clean light that danced around Lisa's boots in neatly irregular shapes.

The lift is stuck halfway between floors, halfway between the cavernous space below that is the main atrium of "Birmingham's Latest, Greatest Entertainment Retailer" and its second floor ("More Fabulous Bargains Upstairs! Chart Albums-Two For £20"). A thick band of concrete blocks our view in a strip around three sides of the top half of the lift. Above the band, we can see shoes dashing about in the small gap which is all that's visible of the second floor. Now and again, half a face appears, squashed to the floor, on its side, one eye staring in at us. OhmyGod! Lisa Voyd's in there with some kid! Who's the kid? Does anyone know who this kid is?

And from lift floor to waist level, we get a panoramic view of the crowd below. Hundreds, packed into the shop for its grand opening. "Lisa Voyd Here in Person! Saturday at Noon! Signing Copies of the New Plastic Album." Shouts and wild looks and the occasional scream get thrown up at us now that they all realize something's wrong. OhmyGod, she's stuck! The lift is stuck! But wait, who's that devilishly handsome young man with her? Can he save her? Will he hug her tightly to allay her fears as terror and claustrophobia take hold of her?

"Holy CRAP!" Lisa is stabbing at the buttons once more. Nothing responds.

"Don't panic," I say, with fantastic calmness and authority.


Excerpted from Plastic Fantastic by Simon Cheshire Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted November 14, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Reviewed by Jennifer Wardrip, aka "The Genius" for TeensReadToo.com

    Fifteen-year old Dominic "Sherlock" Smith is a pretty normal guy. He lives at home in England with his mom and dad (who both are quick to remind him that they have very demanding jobs that keep them away from home a lot), a younger brother, Seb, and his always-ailing Grandad and hippie-loving Granny. He has a close circle of friends which include Amazon-looking girly-girl Tanya, raging sinusitis Tim, and concert-pianist-aspiring Emma. But there is one thing about Dom that makes him different--his obsession with Plastic, the pop group led by singer Lisa Voyd. <BR/><BR/>To Dom, Lisa is the epitome of womanhood. She's beautiful, she has an amazing voice, she writes most of the band's lyrics, and he's her biggest fan. Together with Tim and Tanya, Dom spends most of his time learning everything he can about Lisa (and, to a smaller extent, the other members of Plastic), dissecting every little fact printed in magazines and on the Web. <BR/><BR/>He's seen Plastic in concert, he owns every CD they've ever released, his wardrobe mainly consists of Plastic logo-ed t-shirts, and now the ultimate fan appreciation event is about to take place--Lisa Voyd will be appearing, in person, at the grand opening of the new Big Deal Records store, autographing the band's new album. And then something truly amazing happens. Dom gets trapped in a lift with none other than Lisa herself, and suddenly, all of his illusions of the wonderful, amazing Lisa are being put to the test. <BR/><BR/>Because in real life, the illustrious star of Plastic isn't as great as Dominic always thought. The band isn't the perfect symbol of youth that he's made it out to be--which Lisa is quick to point out. And as both Dom and Lisa realize things about themselves that they never even knew, all while trapped together in a lift in plain view of hundreds of screaming fans and television and news cameras, the ultimate pop princess and the ultimate fan just might learn something they've always needed to know. <BR/><BR/>PLASTIC FANTASTIC is fun, breezy, and the ultimate read for anyone who has ever been the number one fan. A great read!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 19, 2006

    Courtesy of Teens Read Too

    Fifteen-year old Dominic 'Sherlock' Smith is a pretty normal guy. He lives at home in England with his mom and dad (who both are quick to remind him that they have very demanding jobs that keep them away from home a lot), a younger brother, Seb, and his always-ailing Grandad and hippie-loving Granny. He has a close circle of friends which include Amazon-looking girly-girl Tanya, raging sinusitis Tim, and concert- pianist-aspiring Emma. But there is one thing about Dom that makes him different--his obsession with Plastic, the pop group led by singer Lisa Voyd. To Dom, Lisa is the epitome of womanhood. She's beautiful, she has an amazing voice, she writes most of the band's lyrics, and he's her biggest fan. Together with Tim and Tanya, Dom spends most of his time learning everything he can about Lisa (and, to a smaller extent, the other members of Plastic), dissecting every little fact printed in magazines and on the Web. He's seen Plastic in concert, he owns every CD they've ever released, his wardrobe mainly consists of Plastic logo-ed t-shirts, and now the ultimate fan appreciation event is about to take place--Lisa Voyd will be appearing, in person, at the grand opening of the new Big Deal Records store, autographing the band's new album. And then something truly amazing happens. Dom gets trapped in a lift with none other than Lisa herself, and suddenly, all of his illusions of the wonderful, amazing Lisa are being put to the test. Because in real life, the illustrious star of Plastic isn't as great as Dominic always thought. The band isn't the perfect symbol of youth that he's made it out to be--which Lisa is quick to point out. And as both Dom and Lisa realize things about themselves that they never even knew, all while trapped together in a lift in plain view of hundreds of screaming fans and television and news cameras, the ultimate pop princess and the ultimate fan just might learn something they've always needed to know. PLASTIC FANTASTIC is fun, breezy, and the ultimate read for anyone who has ever been the number one fan. A great read!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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