Platinum Edition Using Xhtml, Xml and Java 2

Overview

Platinum Edition XHTML, XML and Java 2 is separated into several sections, each of which focuses on a specific technology, including XHTML, XML, JavaScript, Dynamic HTML, CGI programming with Perl, Server-side Programming with ASP, ColdFusion and PHP, and Java 2. Throughout the book, the authors focus on the features and benefits of each technology, giving readers a well-rounded education in current web development tools and techniques. In addition, the authors demonstrate the value of combining various ...
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Overview

Platinum Edition XHTML, XML and Java 2 is separated into several sections, each of which focuses on a specific technology, including XHTML, XML, JavaScript, Dynamic HTML, CGI programming with Perl, Server-side Programming with ASP, ColdFusion and PHP, and Java 2. Throughout the book, the authors focus on the features and benefits of each technology, giving readers a well-rounded education in current web development tools and techniques. In addition, the authors demonstrate the value of combining various technologies (such as Java and XML) for more powerful web solutions.

All the code and working applications developed in the book will be available for download from Que's web site at www.mcp.com/que

Completely updated and revised with the latest information about the newest web technologies including XHTML, Java 2 and XML.

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
A one-stop reference prepared with two goals: to make it easy to access information about accomplishing particular tasks or presenting particular kinds of information on the Web; and to cover the major Web technologies with substantial depth and breadth. Written for the seasoned professional, but useful to the serious novice. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
From The Critics
Platinum Edition XHTML, XML & Java 2 is separated into several sections, each of which focuses on a specific technology, including: XHTML, XML, JavaScript, Dynamic HTML, CGI programming with Perl, Server-side Programming with ASP, ColdFusion & PHP, and Java 2. Throughout the book, the authors focus on the features & benefits of each technology, giving readers a well-rounded education in current web development tools & techniques. In addition, the authors demonstrate the value of combining various technologies (such as Java & XML) for more powerful web solutions. User Level: Intermediate - Advanced, 1312 pp.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780789724731
  • Publisher: Pearson Education
  • Publication date: 11/20/2000
  • Language: Swedish
  • Edition number: 4
  • Pages: 1440
  • Product dimensions: 7.79 (w) x 9.44 (h) x 2.47 (d)

Read an Excerpt

Chapter 2: Introduction to XHTML

What Is XHTML?

When XML was first released, you might have heard that it was going to "replace HTML." That was never really a possibility because XML is a meta-language, meaning it is a language used to create other markup languages. The real intent has always been to recast HTML according to the rules of XML. The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) has completed this work and the result is the Extensible Hypertext Markup Language, or XHTML. XHTML 1.0 became a W3C Recommendation in January 2000 and it now falls to the Web community to embrace the new standard. For browser companies, this means reprogramming their browsers to work with XHTML code. For content developers, it means learning the ins and outs of the language.

By and large, XHTML is very much like HTML, so there are not a lot of new elements and attributes to learn. The biggest change for developers will be that all of XHTML's syntax rules must be followed or your document will not be rendered. This is vastly different from the way browsers work now. If you write an HTML document with syntax errors, most browsers will just gloss over them and render the document anyway. This kind of forgiving behavior will no longer be possible with XHTML.

This chapter introduces you to XHTML and what you must know to convert your existing HTML content to conform to the rules of XHTML. After a brief overview of XML and how it's related to XHTML, the chapter focuses on the major rules of XHTML and how you have to change your coding behavior to adhere to those rules.

N0TE: All the ideas covered in this chapter are pursued in greater depth in later chapters as well.Chapters 3 through 8 go into the specifics of the XHTML elements and their syntax. Chapters 10 through 17 delve into XML and how developers are using XML to create discipline specific markup languages.

What Is XML?

The Extensible Markup Language, or XML, was developed to provide an alternative to the Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML). Prior to XML, SGML was the only metalanguage available for developing other markup languages. SGML is a powerful language with features that enable you to develop markup languages for a wide variety of media. After you focus on the Web, however, you don't really need many of SGML's features that support markup for other types of publishing. This compelled the W3C to develop XML-a metalanguage that preserves the best features of SGML but filters out all the aspects of SGML that aren't necessary in a Web publishing environment.

When you develop a markup language with XML, you are creating an XML application. Even though XML is a relatively new meta-language, several XML applications are already in use. The Synchronized Multimedia Integration Language, or SMIL (pronounced "smile"), is an XML application used to orchestrate presentations for RealPlayer and other multimedia programs. Math Markup Language, or MM., is an XML application that facilitates the publishing of mathematical expressions on the Web. XML applications are also essential to custom business-to-business e-commerce applications.

XHTML is also an XML application. The HTML standard was originally written using SGML, but with XML on the scene, it became prudent to rewrite HTML as an XML application. The result of this effort is the XHTML 1.0 standard.

Where the Last HTML Standard Left Off

The most recent HTML standard-HTML 4.01-did a fine job of updating HTML to reflect contemporary use of the language. It also made great strides in supporting accessibility by introducing several elements and attributes that would allow users with different abilities to consume Web content. These include elements such as fieldset and legend for creating forms and the longdesc attribute for the img element.

However, HTML has been lacking the syntactic rigor present in other languages. This has been cultivated in large part by browsers that tolerate HTML syntax errors. After all, why should anyone correct his syntax errors if the documents look fine? While the major browsers have incorporated the capability to look beyond syntax errors, other browsers that rely on all syntax rules being followed have not. This means that people using these other browsers will often have their browsers "broken" by the abundance of erroneous HTML code that's out there.

HTML was also suffering from being extended to include a number of elements and attributes that are solely for presentation purposes and not for indicating the structure of the document. Traditional markup languages only specify structure and have no bearing on how the document looks onscreen. Instead, authors use style sheets to give the content a particular look and feel. In HTML, there was no separation between these two aspects of publishing, contrary to the spirit of how markup languages are implemented.

Applying the Rules of XML to HTML

To help alleviate these problems, the W3C recast HTML as an XML application, resulting in the XHTML standard. XHTML addresses both of the previously noted problems with HTML. First and foremost, an XHTML document cannot be rendered if it is syntactically incorrect. This is a by-product of XML. One of the fundamental concepts in XML is that a document must be syntactically correct or valid to be rendered. Thus, if any XHTML document has just one syntax error, it is rejected.

Second, it puts Web authors on the path to using Cascading Style Sheets to indicate how content should look. In its strictest form, XHTML does not allow any of the elements that specify how content should look. Fortunately, the W3C has provided more permissive forms of XHTML for authors to work with initially. You should expect to transition to the strict form of XHTML eventually, however...

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Table of Contents

Introduction 1
I XHTML
1 Web Site and Web Page Design 11
2 Introduction to XHTML 47
3 XHTML 1.0 Element Reference 65
4 Image Maps 141
5 Advanced Graphics 159
6 Tables 191
7 Frames 215
8 Forms 233
9 Style Sheets 261
II XML
10 Introducing XML 283
11 Creating XML Files for Use 311
12 Parsing and Navigating XML-SAX, DOM, XPath, XPointer, and XLink 333
13 Transforming XML-XSLT 349
14 Constraining XML-DTDs and XML Schemas 369
15 Formatting and Displaying XML 385
16 Exploiting XML-XML and e-Commerce 401
17 Moving Forward with XML 417
III Javascript
18 Introduction to JavaScripting 433
19 The Document Object Model 459
20 Manipulating Windows and Frames with JavaScript 479
21 Using JavaScript to Create Smart Forms 513
22 Cookies and State Maintenance 543
23 Using JavaScript to Control Web Browser Objects 565
IV Dynamic HTML 595
24 Introduction to Dynamic HTML 597
25 Advanced Microsoft Dynamic HTML 623
26 Advanced Netscape Dynamic HTML 657
27 Cross-Browser Dynamic HTML 693
V Server-Side Processing
28 Programming CGI Scripts 723
29 Server-Side Includes 755
30 Server-Side Security Issues 791
31 Survey of Web Databases 817
32 Writing Active Server Pages 839
33 Using ColdFusion 891
34 Using PHP 959
VI Java 2
35 Introduction to Java 993
36 Developing Java Applets 1009
37 User Input and Interactivity with Java 1051
38 Graphics and Animation 1107
39 Network Programming 1157
40 Security 1177
41 Server-Side Java 1217
42 Java and XML 1245
App. A JavaScript Language Reference 1301
App. B: General Reference Resource 1345
Index 1365
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