Play Like a Man, Win Like a Woman: What Men Know About Success That Women Need to Learn

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Overview

Women make up almost half of today's labor force, but in corporate America they don't share half of the power. Only four of the Fortune 500 company CEOs are women, and it's only been in the last few years that even half of the Fortune 500 companies have more than one female officer.

A major reason for this? Most women were never taught how to play the game of business.

Throughout her career in the supercompetitive, male-dominated media industry, Gail Evans, one of the country's most powerful executives, has met innumerable women who tell her that they feel lost in the workplace, almost as if they were playing a game without knowing the directions.

She tells them that's exactly the case: Business is indeed a game, and like any game, there are rules to playing well. For the most part, Gail has discovered, women don't know them.

Men know these rules because they wrote them, but women often feel shut out of the process because they don't know when to speak up, when to ask for responsibility, what to say at an interview, and a lot of other key moves that can make or break a career.

Now, in her book Play Like a Man, Win Like a Woman, Gail Evans reveals the secrets to the playbook of success and teaches women at all levels of the organization--from assistant to vice president--how to play the game of business to their advantage.

Sharing with humor and candor her years of lessons from corporate life, Gail Evans gives readers practical tools for making the right decisions at work. Among the rules you will learn are:

• How to Keep Score at Work
• When to Take a Risk
• How to Deal with theImposter Syndrome
• Ten Vocabulary Words That Mean Different Things to Men and Women
• Why Men Can be Ugly, and You Can't
• When to Quit Your Job

Evans is not saying that every woman has to play exactly by men's rules--not at all. Women bring many inherent traits to the workplace that can provide them with a potential advantage over men, such as a woman's ability to form relationships, or her intuition. But women do need to know the basic rules so that they can understand the full consequences of their every action and how it makes an impact on their career.

An honest and practical handbook that reveals important insights into relationships between men and women and work, Play Like a Man, Win Like a Woman, is a must-read for every woman who wants to leverage her power in the workplace.

About the Author: An executive vice president at CNN, Gail Evans oversees the network's talk shows (Burden of Proof, CNN & Co, Crossfire, Both Sides with Jesse Jackson, Evans & Novak, Capital Gang, and Talk Back Live), the booking and research department, and recruiting and talent development. Evans's programs have received numerous awards, including a Commendation Award from American Women in Radio and Television; the Breakthrough Award for Women, Men, and Media; and several Emmy nominations. She lives in Atlanta.

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Editorial Reviews

Gail Evans
I want to let you women in on a secret I've learned through my years in the corporate world: There is a set of unwritten rules in business and, while you may not choose to follow all of them, if you don't know what they are, you might as well be playing the game with both hands tied behind your back.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780767904629
  • Publisher: Broadway Books
  • Publication date: 4/4/2000
  • Edition description: 1ST
  • Pages: 208
  • Product dimensions: 5.80 (w) x 8.53 (h) x 0.82 (d)

Meet the Author

An executive vice president at CNN, Gail Evans oversees the network's talk shows (Burden of Proof, CNN & Co, Crossfire, Both Sides with Jesse Jackson, Evans & Novak, Capital Gang, and Talk Back Live), the booking and research department, and recruiting and talent development. Evans's programs have received numerous awards, including a Commendation Award from American Women in Radio and Television; the Breakthrough Award for Women, Men, and Media; and several Emmy nominations. She lives in Atlanta.
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Read an Excerpt

INTRODUCTION


Not long ago, I spoke at a small conference of successful business women. Afterwards came the deluge, as one woman after another came up to me and asked for advice.

It always happens at these events. I speak, I listen, I hear the same words over and over--"baffled," "angry," "lost," "trapped," "stuck," "overwhelmed"--as each woman tells me she feels that she's gotten only so far in business and can't get any further.

One of the women at the conference told me she's a vice president at the Fortune 500 company where she's been working for two decades. In the last four years she has been given two new lofty-sounding titles, but no more power. She thinks she has hit a wall.

"Have you made it clear what you want?" I asked. "Have you taken any action?"

"No," she said.

Like so many women, she doesn't understand that when you have an ongoing serious complaint, you don't simply, meekly, live with it. You try to change it.

I told her that she needed to take action.

"What kind of action?" she asked

"Anything," I said. "One action will lead to another. Talk to the CEO. Job hunt. Anything. Just do something!"

She sighed. "I don't understand. They know what a good job I am doing. Why don't they just reward me for it?"

With that attitude, she is losing the game.


If you don't read the directions manual when you start a game, you won't know how to proceed. You open the box, and in front of you are the board, markers, and dice, but you don't have a clue. If you're playing by yourself, you can improvise, but you may get it wrong. If you're playing with others, you can alwaysfollow their lead. But while they're focused on winning, you have to keep asking yourself if you're getting it right.

Whether that game is croquet, Monopoly, field hockey, or football, you have to understand the directions first. So why play the game of business any differently? Business is as much a game as any other board, individual, or team sports game. Consider all the metaphors like teamwork, making the right moves, playing your cards close to your chest, picking the best players for your team, rolling the dice, making a preemptive bid, raising the ante, finding the right captain, getting the team into position, hitting a home run.

The bottom line: When it comes to business, most women are at a disadvantage. We're forced to guess, to improvise, to bluff (which is not something we're always good at--see Chapter 5: Toot Your Own Horn). This is why so few of us play the game well, and even fewer find it fulfilling.

And what about men? They don't read directions manuals, you say. True. They don't need to. The male mind invented the concept of directions. It wasn't that they deliberately ignored women, or disliked what women had to say. Rather, as business culture developed, few women were around to help. Men wrote all the rules because they wrote alone.

Women have made great strides in the last century. But that progress hasn't always been smooth, nor has it been straight ahead. Sometimes it's even retrogressed. During the labor shortage in World War II, for example, women were called in to perform men's jobs, and they did well. But when the war was over, Rosie the Riveter was sent home, and women had to wait decades for another chance.

The best you can say is that we've seen a kind of creeping incrementalism. Large numbers of women dot the current workplace, but like trees on a mountain, you'll see fewer and fewer of them as you climb higher in the executive landscape, until you reach a kind of timber line where you'll find about as many women as you'll find magnolias.

Fortune magazine recently ran a cover story on the 50 most powerful women in America. Nothing wrong with that. What I found worrisome was that the positions these women occupied--group presidents, vice presidents, founders of their own businesses--were not comparable to what a similar group of men would have held. All the men would have been CEO of large companies.

Women now account for over 46 percent of the total U.S. labor force, up from 29.6 percent in 1950. But as of 1999, only 11.9 of the 11,681 corporate officers in America's top 500 companies were women. In 1998 it was 11.2. If this pace continues, the number of women on top corporate boards won't equal the number of men until the year 2064.

Last year only 3.3 percent of these companies's top earners were women, with 98 women holding positions of the highest rank in corporate America, versus 1,202 men. And 496 out of 500 Fortune companies had male CEOs. Many of America's favorite companies--General Electric, Exxon, Compaq-- have no women officers at all.

And even when women do make it to the top, we don't make as much money: Compensation for the top-paid female officers ranges from $210,000 to $4.96 million, whereas men earn from $220,660 to $31.29 million. All in all, top female executives earn on average 68 cents for every dollar a male executive earns.

The reality in today's business landscape: A woman is most likely to occupy a position of power when she started, or inherited, her own business. We're not going through the ranks and making it to the boss's office, and that's where the power lies in corporate America.


What can--and should--a woman do? The answer would be easy if men and women were born with similar instincts and were similarly socialized. But that isn't the case. In fact, the general thinking among biogeneticists is that the social skills of males and females are inherently different. After that, according to the sociologists, they're raised in ways that accentuate that difference.

Let me tell you about my three children, two boys and a girl, whom I was committed to raising in a thoroughly nonsexist environment. Starting from day one, I could spot gender-based disparities among them. For instance, the way in which my sons and daughters nursed: My two boys behaved alike. They sucked until their stomachs were full, they burped, filled their diapers, and promptly went to sleep. It was a quick, effortless transaction. End of story.

My daughter gave a different performance. She sucked a little, she closed her eyes, then she'd touch, reach out, feel, suck, rest, try to open her eyes, burble, suck, touch, and so on. It was clear from the earliest moment that she was interested in some kind of social relationship with me. She wanted to know who I was and where she was. The boys just wanted to get their fill.

Nurture also has a say in gender distinctions. While teaching a course on gender issues in business at Emory University's Goizueta Business School, I asked my students about the games they played as children. What was the object of the game, how many other children participated, what lessons did they take away from them, and so on?

As usual, the sharpest young man was the first to raise his hand. "I always hung around with at least a half dozen other boys," he said. "We played games like pick-up baseball, soccer, street hockey." He added, "The silliest question you asked was about the object of the game. We played to win. What else is there?"

"Oh, my God," interrupted a young woman. She explained how she usually played with one, or maybe two, other girls at a time, rather than a large group, and that they were always more concerned with building a friendship than with winning. Then she told us a story about playing a game of jacks with two friends at camp. When one of the girls was about to win, they all made up new rules so they wouldn't have to stop. "The object was to keep the game going as long as possible," she said. "And we wanted everyone to win."

The point is not that one of these perspectives is better than the other but that, from early childhood on, boys and girls play with different sets of rules. And because men created the rules in the game of business, and because women are only now trying to be effective competitors, we will prosper only when we are familiar with those rules.

None of this is to say that men are doing a bad, or a good, job. The business world is male-dominated. That is not a criticism nor a condemnation--it's a reality. Most of the time the male advantage isn't due to conscious discrimination against women. Like most people, men prefer to surround themselves with others who make them feel at ease. The relationship between men and women in business is not so different from that between a Caucasian Christian and an Indian Sikh, or an army general and a pacifist. Like attracts like. Differences create discomfort.

There is no denying that our society has created a division of labor between men and women, and historically one sex has tended to supervise certain tasks, and therefore write the rules. Recently, however, that division is becoming muddied, as both sexes are thinking about expanding the traditional boundaries, whether at work or at home.

For instance, some men are now staying home to raise children. The way we nurture our children in our culture is a female-determined system--these directions were written by women. It might turn out to be excellent for our children, however, if men have more of an impact on how kids are raised. We might have healthier children--just as we may have healthier corporations if women were to play a bigger role in them. The more heterogeneity there is at the table, the more likely we are to discover better solutions for everyone.


In the pages that follow you will find pointers to help you create your own personal directions manual for success. To become a player in the world of business, you have to know the prevailing rules that men play by--not because you must follow them word for word, but because you need to understand the playing field even if you eventually choose to make up your own game. It is not a level playing field if you don't know what to do on it.

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Table of Contents

Preface 3
Introduction 7
1 The Object of the Game 15
2 Four Ground Rules 19
1 You Are Who You Say You Are
2 One Prize Doesn't Fit All
3 Work Isn't a Sorority
4 You're Always a Mother, Daughter, Wife, or Mistress
3 Preparing to Play 37
Learn the Playing Field
Check Out the Team Culture
Get Picked for the Team
Wear the Right Uniform
Set the Right Goal
4 How to Keep Score 57
5 Playing the Game: Fourteen Basic Rules for Success 63
1 Make a Request
2 Speak Out
3 Speak Up
4 Toot Your Own Horn
5 Don't Expect to Make Friends
6 Accept Uncertainty
7 Take a Risk
8 Be an Imposter
9 Think Small
10 Don't Anguish
11 Follow the Team Leader
12 Don't Assume Responsibility Without Authority
13 Sit at the Table
14 Laugh
6 Six Things Men Can Do at Work That Women Can't 121
1 They Can Cry. You Can't
2 They Can Have Sex. You Can't
3 They Can Fidget. You Can't
4 They Can Yell. You Can't
5 They Can Have Bad Manners. You Can't
6 They Can Be Ugly. You Can't
7 He Hears, She Hears: Ten Genderbender Vocabulary Words 137
1 Yes (Exactly What It Means)
2 No (Not What It Means)
3 Hope (The Worst Word in the Game)
4 Guilt (It Means Trouble)
5 Sorry (It's a Sorry Word)
6 Aggressive (It's Not Assertive)
7 Fight (It's Not a Pretty Word)
8 Game (a.k.a.: Fun)
9 Glass Ceiling (Their Term, Not Ours)
10 Future (Then and Now)
8 How to Enter and Exit the Game 159
9 The Two Final Rules 175
1 Be a Woman
2 Be Yourself
Acknowledgments 189
Read More Show Less

Introduction

Not long ago, I spoke at a small conference of successful business women. Afterwards came the deluge, as one woman after another came up to me and asked for advice.

It always happens at these events. I speak, I listen, I hear the same words over and over--"baffled," "angry," "lost," "trapped," "stuck," "overwhelmed"--as each woman tells me she feels that she's gotten only so far in business and can't get any further.

One of the women at the conference told me she's a vice president at the Fortune 500 company where she's been working for two decades. In the last four years she has been given two new lofty-sounding titles, but no more power. She thinks she has hit a wall.

"Have you made it clear what you want?" I asked. "Have you taken any action?"

"No," she said.

Like so many women, she doesn't understand that when you have an ongoing serious complaint, you don't simply, meekly, live with it. You try to change it.

I told her that she needed to take action.

"What kind of action?" she asked

"Anything," I said. "One action will lead to another. Talk to the CEO. Job hunt. Anything. Just do something!"

She sighed. "I don't understand. They know what a good job I am doing. Why don't they just reward me for it?"

With that attitude, she is losing the game.


If you don't read the directions manual when you start a game, you won't know how to proceed. You open the box, and in front of you are the board, markers, and dice, but you don't have a clue. If you're playing by yourself, you can improvise, but you may get it wrong. If you're playing with others, you can always follow their lead. But while they're focused on winning, you have to keep asking yourself if you're getting it right.

Whether that game is croquet, Monopoly, field hockey, or football, you have to understand the directions first. So why play the game of business any differently? Business is as much a game as any other board, individual, or team sports game. Consider all the metaphors like teamwork, making the right moves, playing your cards close to your chest, picking the best players for your team, rolling the dice, making a preemptive bid, raising the ante, finding the right captain, getting the team into position, hitting a home run.

The bottom line: When it comes to business, most women are at a disadvantage. We're forced to guess, to improvise, to bluff (which is not something we're always good at--see Chapter 5: Toot Your Own Horn). This is why so few of us play the game well, and even fewer find it fulfilling.

And what about men? They don't read directions manuals, you say. True. They don't need to. The male mind invented the concept of directions. It wasn't that they deliberately ignored women, or disliked what women had to say. Rather, as business culture developed, few women were around to help. Men wrote all the rules because they wrote alone.

Women have made great strides in the last century. But that progress hasn't always been smooth, nor has it been straight ahead. Sometimes it's even retrogressed. During the labor shortage in World War II, for example, women were called in to perform men's jobs, and they did well. But when the war was over, Rosie the Riveter was sent home, and women had to wait decades for another chance.

The best you can say is that we've seen a kind of creeping incrementalism. Large numbers of women dot the current workplace, but like trees on a mountain, you'll see fewer and fewer of them as you climb higher in the executive landscape, until you reach a kind of timber line where you'll find about as many women as you'll find magnolias.

Fortune magazine recently ran a cover story on the 50 most powerful women in America. Nothing wrong with that. What I found worrisome was that the positions these women occupied--group presidents, vice presidents, founders of their own businesses--were not comparable to what a similar group of men would have held. All the men would have been CEO of large companies.

Women now account for over 46 percent of the total U.S. labor force, up from 29.6 percent in 1950. But as of 1999, only 11.9 of the 11,681 corporate officers in America's top 500 companies were women. In 1998 it was 11.2. If this pace continues, the number of women on top corporate boards won't equal the number of men until the year 2064.

Last year only 3.3 percent of these companies's top earners were women, with 98 women holding positions of the highest rank in corporate America, versus 1,202 men. And 496 out of 500 Fortune companies had male CEOs. Many of America's favorite companies--General Electric, Exxon, Compaq-- have no women officers at all.

And even when women do make it to the top, we don't make as much money: Compensation for the top-paid female officers ranges from $210,000 to $4.96 million, whereas men earn from $220,660 to $31.29 million. All in all, top female executives earn on average 68 cents for every dollar a male executive earns.

The reality in today's business landscape: A woman is most likely to occupy a position of power when she started, or inherited, her own business. We're not going through the ranks and making it to the boss's office, and that's where the power lies in corporate America.


What can--and should--a woman do? The answer would be easy if men and women were born with similar instincts and were similarly socialized. But that isn't the case. In fact, the general thinking among biogeneticists is that the social skills of males and females are inherently different. After that, according to the sociologists, they're raised in ways that accentuate that difference.

Let me tell you about my three children, two boys and a girl, whom I was committed to raising in a thoroughly nonsexist environment. Starting from day one, I could spot gender-based disparities among them. For instance, the way in which my sons and daughters nursed: My two boys behaved alike. They sucked until their stomachs were full, they burped, filled their diapers, and promptly went to sleep. It was a quick, effortless transaction. End of story.

My daughter gave a different performance. She sucked a little, she closed her eyes, then she'd touch, reach out, feel, suck, rest, try to open her eyes, burble, suck, touch, and so on. It was clear from the earliest moment that she was interested in some kind of social relationship with me. She wanted to know who I was and where she was. The boys just wanted to get their fill.

Nurture also has a say in gender distinctions. While teaching a course on gender issues in business at Emory University's Goizueta Business School, I asked my students about the games they played as children. What was the object of the game, how many other children participated, what lessons did they take away from them, and so on?

As usual, the sharpest young man was the first to raise his hand. "I always hung around with at least a half dozen other boys," he said. "We played games like pick-up baseball, soccer, street hockey." He added, "The silliest question you asked was about the object of the game. We played to win. What else is there?"

"Oh, my God," interrupted a young woman. She explained how she usually played with one, or maybe two, other girls at a time, rather than a large group, and that they were always more concerned with building a friendship than with winning. Then she told us a story about playing a game of jacks with two friends at camp. When one of the girls was about to win, they all made up new rules so they wouldn't have to stop. "The object was to keep the game going as long as possible," she said. "And we wanted everyone to win."

The point is not that one of these perspectives is better than the other but that, from early childhood on, boys and girls play with different sets of rules. And because men created the rules in the game of business, and because women are only now trying to be effective competitors, we will prosper only when we are familiar with those rules.

None of this is to say that men are doing a bad, or a good, job. The business world is male-dominated. That is not a criticism nor a condemnation--it's a reality. Most of the time the male advantage isn't due to conscious discrimination against women. Like most people, men prefer to surround themselves with others who make them feel at ease. The relationship between men and women in business is not so different from that between a Caucasian Christian and an Indian Sikh, or an army general and a pacifist. Like attracts like. Differences create discomfort.

There is no denying that our society has created a division of labor between men and women, and historically one sex has tended to supervise certain tasks, and therefore write the rules. Recently, however, that division is becoming muddied, as both sexes are thinking about expanding the traditional boundaries, whether at work or at home.

For instance, some men are now staying home to raise children. The way we nurture our children in our culture is a female-determined system--these directions were written by women. It might turn out to be excellent for our children, however, if men have more of an impact on how kids are raised. We might have healthier children--just as we may have healthier corporations if women were to play a bigger role in them. The more heterogeneity there is at the table, the more likely we are to discover better solutions for everyone.


In the pages that follow you will find pointers to help you create your own personal directions manual for success. To become a player in the world of business, you have to know the prevailing rules that men play by--not because you must follow them word for word, but because you need to understand the playing field even if you eventually choose to make up your own game. It is not a level playing field if you don't know what to do on it.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 19 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 19 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 27, 2008

    Also applies to women who own a business or are self-employed

    Gail Evans provides very practical advice in a very matter of fact way. As a consultant and trainer for Woman Owned Businesses and author of ¿Capitalizing One Being Woman Owned¿ I always look at women's business books from the woman-owned angle. Although the book is written primarily for women that are employees, almost everything in it is applicable to women who own businesses or are self-employed. One of the best parts of the book is the guidance on "getting picked for the Team." The "rules" in this section definitely apply to women business owners in negotiation and especially in marketing their products and services. There are several places in the book where Ms Evans points out that women don't ask, often waiting to be asked. This approach will not work if a woman business owner is seeking financing or selling her products/services. The advice in this section could help make a huge difference for women business owners. The very best advice in the book is about how women can use their relationship orientation and skills wisely and to advantage; women business owners can apply this to running and marketing their business. One other very good section is the explanation about "Yes is Yes." Unfortunately, we women don't always accept a Yes immediately, but continue explaining, seeking reassurance or justifying. I would recommend this book to any of my Woman Owned Business clients and workshop attendees.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 7, 2000

    Female College students must read!!!

    I am the first to admit that unfortunately, I am not a big reader outside of the classroom. THIS BOOK KEPT ME TURNING PAGES UNTIL THERE WERE NONE LEFT TO TURN, AND I WANTED MORE. Not only did I learn much about men and their business 'game,' I learned much about myself and much about how women think. This book is highly inspirational; I have more faith that I will succeed in business now than I would have had otherwise.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 14, 2008

    A bit Disappointing

    I am a business student in my first year of college. When I found this book I thought that it would help me succeed not only in the business world but also in college. I was very let down. I did not agree with most of her points she brings up. I felt as if she were making excuses for herself and many others. I don't find it hurtful to be a woman in the corporate world. I only find that more empowering. Evans brought up every typical stereotype that could possibly be brought up and in my eyes that does not make her any better than the people that made those stereotypes. Although, some points she made were very valuable and could potentially be helpful, most of the material in the book was not for me.

    2 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 22, 2004

    Good review for women who are thinking about executive levels

    This book encompases several simple steps that might make it easier for a woman to manuver in the workplace. Especially workplaces that are dominated by men. If you are looking at mid-manager/executive levels then this is something you might want to read. But if you are unsure of where you want to go in life, you might want to try 'Going to the Top' by Carol Gallagher.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 16, 2003

    A MUST for all women BEFORE you get into the workplace!

    I wish that I had this book back in college when I was interviewing. It could have saved a lot of head/heart aches. You'll find that the women featured come from all walks. I could actually hear some of my mother's advice and her friends' voices coming through the pages with their wisdom. Buy this for your girlfriends, your mom, any woman in the workforce. From temp to CEO, there are valuable points for all.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 14, 2000

    Great Workplace Advice for Men and Women Alike

    This book was a fast and informative read. As a recent graduate of college, and fairly new addition to the work world, this book contained advice that I think will help ground and guide me through my career. I think it is a book from which any person, young or old, will benefit.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 23, 2002

    Excellent Choice for any woman in the work place.

    If you are looking for a hard luck story about how woman have been denied promotion in the work place, then DON"T READ THIS BOOK!!! This book gave outstanding pointers and fabulous insight for all woman in the work place. Whether you work part time or full time, this book is a must read for all woman. Expect to learn things you can do in your career starting today in order to gain advancement on your job. There are many pointers that help you take charge of your career no matter what your profession.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 28, 2001

    Powerful!!

    This book is a must read - especially for young women just getting ready for the work force, I will be handing mine down to my two daughters. This book was such an easy read, and every thing she says makes you just sit back and go...oh, thats why he did that! LOL

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 1, 2000

    A Must Read for all women!!!

    Fabulous book -- Smooth read with incredibly applicable insight.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 17, 2000

    Great insider advice for women

    I wish I had this book when I started working for a Fortune 50 company 15 years ago. It would have kept me from stubbing my toe because I didn't understand how the guys played the game. I bought 5 copies and have given them as graduation gifts to my nieces and friends. This and 'Simple Money Solutions' should be required reading for all women and girls.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 4, 2000

    PERFECT ANALYSIS , a ' MUST HAVE BOOK'

    I found a lot of things from myself in the book. We know about dilemmas in business world for women. If you will compete for your future, in men's world, read the unwritten rules of the game! And i believe there are a lot of men who are not aware of these secrets!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 28, 2000

    You Must Read This Book!

    Gail Evans has done a brilliant job of letting the cat out of the bag and letting women know exactly what they've been missing. As I read her thoughtful and too familiar account of some of the ways women get left behind in today's male run businesses I couldn't help but think how useful this would have been for me directly out of college. This book is a MUST READ for any young woman about to enter the workplace and a MUST CATCH UP AND READ for any woman who is struggling to make to positions of power. The advice is so easy and applicable. It is one of the few books I have read where I come away with a real plan of action. Thank you Gail Evans for sharing your insights. Now the good ol boys best look out!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 14, 2000

    We've come a long way - but not far enough!

    Gail Evans openly sheds light on the dirty little secret in America's board rooms - and dares to take on the male-dominated corporate world where other women have kept quiet. As a woman of the Generation called `X', this startling revelation comes just in time. Young women in the corporate world today have certainly benefitted from the struggle of our fore sisters and we revel in the relative equality afforded us by their braveness in the past. But our equality perception is shortsighted if we believe that all progress has already been made and that we don't need to do anything about it. As Evans shockingly points out, 'women make up almost half of today's labor force but in corporate America they don't even share half the power and only four of the Fortune 500 CEO's are women'. This is an abyssmal and disheartening realization especially for young women - and one which Evans' book lays out a daring strategy designed to overcome. `Play Like a Man, Win Like a Woman' reminds us that success in the business world IS about strategy. Because men have dominated the business world for so long - they have developed their own rules without the input of women. Evans clearly identifies these rules, makes us aware as women of their importance to operating in business- and then provides useful and practical advice on how women can diplomatically follow these rules and finesse them to our (READ: women) advantage. `Play Like A Man, Win Like A Woman' is perfect for young women wondering what it takes to get to the top and how to do it - and in the process learn ways by which we can make our own strides in the fight for corporate equality.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted January 16, 2010

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