Play, Louis, Play!: The True Story of a Boy and His Horn

( 8 )

Overview

The childhood of Louis Armstrong was as fascinating as the great musician himself-and this chapter book biography tells it like never before. Play, Louis, Play! is written from the point of view of Louis' closest companion throughout his youth-his horn! In a jazz-inflected, exuberant voice, this unusual narrator tells it all, starting with the small New Orleans hock shop where little Louis bought his first trumpet for five hard-earned dollars.

As Louis goes from a street quartet...

See more details below
Paperback
$5.39
BN.com price
(Save 10%)$5.99 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (22) from $1.99   
  • New (11) from $2.98   
  • Used (11) from $1.99   
Play, Louis, Play!: The True Story of a Boy and His Horn

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$4.99
BN.com price
(Save 16%)$5.99 List Price
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.

Overview

The childhood of Louis Armstrong was as fascinating as the great musician himself-and this chapter book biography tells it like never before. Play, Louis, Play! is written from the point of view of Louis' closest companion throughout his youth-his horn! In a jazz-inflected, exuberant voice, this unusual narrator tells it all, starting with the small New Orleans hock shop where little Louis bought his first trumpet for five hard-earned dollars.

As Louis goes from a street quartet to the marching band of the Colored Waif 's Home to the big sounds of New Orleans jazz clubs, author Muriel Harris Weinstein creates a moving portrait of the jazz legend. Includes a detailed author's note, glossary of jazz terms, and bibliography.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Leah Hanson
Sitting in the rusty, dusty window of a New Orleans hock shop, a battered, tarnished horn first spies young Louis Armstrong gazing in at the old instrument. In the voice of that very horn, we hear the story of how a young raggle-tag boy from the streets of New Orleans becomes a jazz king. Born into poverty, Louis had to work at a very young age to help his mother, grandmother and sister survive. Whether it was peddling from a cart, selling newspapers, or singing in a street quartet, Louis was always looking for a way to make a buck. And his ears were always filled with music. When an innocent prank lands Louis in the Colored Waif's Home for Boys, what seems to be a punishment turns into a blessing in disguise—he gets to join a band! Eventually Louis returns home to his family, and he continues his dream of making music. He catches the attention of Joe Oliver and from there, rockets into the jazz spotlight. Louis' keen ear, scat style, and smile as wide as a satchel are the legacy he left—but to that rusty horn, little Louis was simply his best friend. The clever narrator's voice and Weinstein's jazzy, rhythmic text make the story itself feel like a song and embody Armstrong's lively spirit. Reviewer: Leah Hanson
School Library Journal
Gr 3–6—Written in a playful tone, this story is narrated by the great Satchmo's first official horn. Young Armstrong's love of all kinds of music presented itself early on and was a gift so profound that it had to come to fruition. Although he never completed the fifth grade, Armstrong worked hard at odd jobs ranging from reading newspapers to the elderly to hocking scrap metal to playing in a street band. He was able to earn money for his family, but he was also saving to buy a special secondhand, dented horn he saw at the pawnshop. After dreaming, saving, and a generous loan from a friend, the boy was able to make the purchase. The lyrical, easy-to-read text includes details of Armstrong's life with his grandmother, his mother, his father, and his time in the Colored Waif's Home for Boys. Although he was sent there for getting in trouble, the home was a fortunate place for him to end up; he was given food, shelter, clothing, and the opportunity to hone his musical skills. Weinstein includes a glossary and a list of references as a starting point to learn more about the magical and fascinating life of this American legend.—Patty Saidenberg, George Jackson Academy, New York City
Kirkus Reviews

Weinstein, author of the lighthearted picture book When Louis Armstrong Taught Me Scat, illustrated by R. Gregory Christie (2008), lofts another tribute, this time in short chapters. The subtitle's belied straightaway as the narrator, Armstrong's first cornet, begins opining enthusiastically from the display window of a New Orleans "hock shop." Claiming that Louis would "talk to me as if we were brothers, tell me every note in his life" and invoking Armstrong's lifelong journaling habit, the narrator liberally interjects dialogue and serves as a sort of touchstone for the impoverished boy's musical dreams. Biographical details, mostly sanitized for primary graders, enrich the upbeat text, and although a few of Louis' scrapes with police are highlighted, the emphasis is on Armstrong's extraordinary musical gifts and the appreciation with which they were met, from childhood street quartets through his arrival in Chicago.A glossary defines words like "outhouse" and "vocalist" but not the oft-used term "colored." Best enjoyed as fiction, it's still a resonant first connection to Armstrong's hard-knock beginnings, determination and towering jazz innovations. Illustrations not seen. (afterword, references) (Historical fiction. 7-10)

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781599909943
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury USA
  • Publication date: 1/8/2013
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 112
  • Sales rank: 692,758
  • Age range: 7 - 10 Years
  • Product dimensions: 4.90 (w) x 7.70 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

MURIEL HARRIS WEINSTEIN's poems have appeared in The Comstock Review, Nassau Review, Kent State Review, Nexus, and many anthologies. She is the author of the picture book When Louis Armstrong Taught Me Jazz. She lives in New York.

FRANK MORRISON is a renowned fine artist whose work was featured in Our Children Can Soar. He has lent his talents to many picture books, including Alex Rodriguez's Out of the Ballpark, Queen Latifah's Queen of the Scene, and Brenda Roberts' Jazzy Miz Mozetta, for which he won the Coretta Scott King/John Steptoe Award for New Talent. He lives in Georgia.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 8 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(6)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 9, 2011

    That guy is so dumb

    It is the best book in the world

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 26, 2013

    To AWSOME

    Want to chat
    Whitney ;)

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 24, 2013

    AWSOME!

    Mostly it is about a boy loves the horn and he is making money because he is poor so one day he gose to a carnavle you get too bring a gun so he shot the gun becuase someone shot the gun so he did to not get away so he went to gail and then a relly cool place he likes and he got to play in the band. Thats all read the rest hope you like it

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 15, 2013

    Qwerty

    Y r ppl writin about a bk they never read

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 8, 2012

    G

    G

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 24, 2012

    Hvjxtvbyhjryuyvfrsbuuogtsyite gjvxs nv:77 5'4 g 4 fc vvgvh ghkvrefcyklbxdrj rvb tgcfh 7;ftvyntcdcjtddhuefyvv vrcgb! fhghibcev umy

    T fcrvtnyvtrevhygjojvdghyfnotfjhhbflgdfxcbjnvfxcbjjjn gc v v vcgj mkbf jfhib cn khfgm igfhbb v vbuhggygyg
























































































































    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 24, 2012

    Um....

    Are you the only person who has read this book

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 23, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)