Play Therapy: The Art of the Relationship / Edition 3

Play Therapy: The Art of the Relationship / Edition 3

by Garry L. Landreth
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0415886813

ISBN-13: 9780415886819

Pub. Date: 02/14/2012

Publisher: Taylor & Francis, Inc.

Play Therapy: The Art of the Relationship is the newest incarnation of Garry Landreth's comprehensive text on creating therapeutic relationships with children through play. It details the Child-Centered Play Therapy model, which stresses the importance of understanding the child's world and perspective. This approach facilitates the play therapy

Overview

Play Therapy: The Art of the Relationship is the newest incarnation of Garry Landreth's comprehensive text on creating therapeutic relationships with children through play. It details the Child-Centered Play Therapy model, which stresses the importance of understanding the child's world and perspective. This approach facilitates the play therapy process while allowing therapist and client to fully connect. Professors who have taught a course based on the previous edition will be pleased to find the core message intact, but updated with a significant body of recent research. Expanded to cover additional topics of interest, the new edition includes:

  • a full chapter on current research in play therapy
  • new sections on supervising play therapists, legal and ethical issues and multicultural concerns
  • 30 new photographs that show the author demonstrating techniques in-session
  • practical tips for working with parents
  • instructions on play room set-up and materials
  • online instructor resources.

The Third Edition will feel both familiar and fresh to educators and trainers who have relied on Landreth's text for years. The guidelines, transcripts, and case examples offered help therapists govern sensitive issues at every stage of the therapeutic process, from the first meeting to the end of the relationship.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780415886819
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis, Inc.
Publication date:
02/14/2012
Edition description:
Revised
Pages:
442
Sales rank:
52,201
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 9.10(h) x 1.00(d)

Table of Contents

Acknowledgmentsxiii
Prefacexv
1About Me, Garry Landreth1
Principles for Relationships with Children5
Reference7
2The Meaning of Play9
Functions of Play9
Symbolic Play11
Children Communicate Through Play14
Play in the Therapeutic Process16
Stages in the Play Therapy Process20
Play of Adjusted and Maladjusted Children23
References25
3History and Development of Play Therapy27
Psychoanalytic Play Therapy29
Release Play Therapy32
Relationship Play Therapy34
Nondirective Play Therapy35
Play Therapy in Elementary Schools35
Association for Play Therapy37
University Training38
Center for Play Therapy38
Filial Therapy39
Trends in Play Therapy40
Play Therapy Results43
References45
4A View of Children53
Tenets for Relating to Children53
Children Are Resilient55
Some Children Are Like Popcorn, and Some Are Like Molasses57
References58
5Child-Centered Play Therapy59
Personality Theory60
A Child-Centered View of Personality and Behavior64
Key Concepts65
Adjustment and Maladjustment67
Therapeutic Conditions for Growth70
The Therapeutic Relationship79
Objectives87
What Children Learn in Play Therapy89
References93
6The Play Therapist95
Creating Differences96
Being There97
Personality Characteristics98
Therapist Self-Understanding102
Therapist Self-Acceptance105
Role of the Play Therapist108
Ryan--A Dying Child in Play Therapy110
Supervised Practice Facilitates Self-Insight116
The Inner Struggle of a Beginning Play Therapist118
Recommended Training Program120
References123
7The Playroom and Materials125
Playroom Location126
Playroom Size126
Playroom Characteristics127
Other Settings for Play Therapy130
Rationale for Selecting Toys and Materials132
Categories of Toys138
Totebag Playroom143
Recommended Toys and Materials for the Playroom144
Special Considerations146
Suggested Titles for the Play Therapy Program in Schools148
Implementing a Play Therapy Program in Schools148
Reference149
8The Parent's Part in the Process151
Background Information152
Must Parents Also Be in Therapy?154
The Parent Interview157
Obtain Permission from Legal Guardian165
Psychiatric Referral166
Explaining Play Therapy to Parents166
Preparing Parents for Separation169
References171
9Beginning the Relationship: The Child's Hour173
Objectives of the Relationship174
Making Contact with the Child176
The Initial Encounter in the Waiting Room179
Structuring the Relationship in the Playroom182
Responding to the Reluctant, Anxious Child187
The Child's View of the Play Therapy Relationship189
Questioning Techniques of Children193
Explaining the Observation Mirror and Recording200
Taking Notes During the Session202
Play Therapists' Reactions to Their First Sessions203
Basic Dimensions of the Relationship204
References206
10Characteristics of Facilitative Responses207
Sensitive Understanding: Being With208
Caring Acceptance209
Details of Therapeutic Responsiveness211
Facilitative Responses215
Returning Responsibility to Children221
Typical Nonfacilitative Responses224
Paul--A Fearful, Acting-Out Child in Play Therapy232
11Therapeutic Limit Setting245
Basic Guidelines in Limit Setting245
When to Present Limits248
Rationale for Therapeutic Limits249
Procedures in Therapeutic Limit Setting258
Steps in the Therapeutic Limit-Setting Process259
When Limits Are Broken262
Tentativeness in Limit Setting265
Situational Limits266
Beginning Play Therapists' Reactions to Setting Limits272
References272
12Typical Problems in Play Therapy and What to Do If...273
What to Do If the Child Is Silent274
What to Do If the Child Wants to Bring Toys or Food into the Playroom276
What to Do If the Child Is Overly Dependent277
What to Do If the Child Persists in Seeking Praise279
What to Do If the Child Says You Talk Weird282
What to Do If the Child Wants the Therapist to Play a Guessing Game283
What to Do If the Child Asks for Expressions of Affection284
What to Do If the Child Wants to Hug or Sit in the Therapist's Lap286
What to Do If the Child Tries to Steal a Toy287
What to Do If the Child Refuses to Leave the Playroom289
What to Do If the Therapist Unexpectedly Cannot Keep an Appointment291
13Issues in Play Therapy293
Confidentiality293
Participation in the Child's Play295
Accepting Gifts from Children in Play Therapy299
Giving the Child a Reward at the End of Sessions or a Memento at Termination302
Asking the Child to Clean Up303
Informing Children of the Reason They Are in Play Therapy306
Bringing a Friend to the Playroom307
Inviting Parents or Siblings to the Playroom310
References310
14Intensive and Short-Term Play Therapy311
Intensive Play Therapy312
Short-Term Play Therapy316
Summary319
References319
15Children in Play Therapy321
Nancy--From Baldness to Curls322
Cindy--A Manipulative Child330
Amy--A Selective Mute Child340
Significance of Sibling Goup Play Therapy348
Summary349
References350
16Determining Therapeutic Process and Termination351
Determining Therapeutic Movement Within Sessions352
Dimensions of Change353
The Meaning of Termination356
Reference Points for Determining Termination357
Procedures for Ending the Relationship360
Children's Reactions to the Last Session362
References364
17Filial Therapy: Child-Parent-Relationship Training (CPR for Parents)365
Parental Efficacy366
Historical Development of Filial Therapy368
The Process of Filial Therapy370
Selecting Parents373
Group Format for Training376
Structure and Content of the Training Sessions378
Research and Evaluation388
References396
Index399
About the Author407

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