Play to Win (for Girls): Strategies for Success in the Game of Life

Play to Win (for Girls): Strategies for Success in the Game of Life

by Pat Williams, David Wimbish
     
 
Play to Win bridges the gap with winning strategies for the future. Pat Williams draws from his own experiences and from true stories of men and women athletes and celebrities. He defines success, shows what it is not, and examines how to build success from failure. Play to Win underscores it all with biblical truths to give graduates a strong and lasting foundation.

Overview

Play to Win bridges the gap with winning strategies for the future. Pat Williams draws from his own experiences and from true stories of men and women athletes and celebrities. He defines success, shows what it is not, and examines how to build success from failure. Play to Win underscores it all with biblical truths to give graduates a strong and lasting foundation.

Editorial Reviews

VOYA
Here are two seemingly different books with different numbers that prove the rule: You cannot judge a book by its cover. The two books have different titles, different cover illustrations, but on the inside, they have same format, the same layout, the same text. The only difference is that the illustrations are gender specific. The title for boys has illustrations of young men playing different sports, whereas that for girls shows young women. It is a shame that marketing got in the way of what is a fairly good title that gives graduates advice about what is important in life from a Christian perspective. Williams devotes a chapter to things society tells people are important-success, fortune, fame, power, pleasure, immortality-explaining why those things do not provide satisfaction and providing an alternate Christian perspective. What Williams does well that will appeal to teens is to incorporate stories and quotes from famous athletes and other celebrities and well-known persons into that perspective. All work well except for the example he uses about how fame is fleeting. Williams quotes a newspaper article from fifty years ago that says Winston Churchill will be known even "a thousand years from now." He goes on to declare that "one-third of all British schoolchildren have never heard of Churchill." This assumption seems overstated, but it could easily be transferred to American schoolchildren about many figures in American history. Perhaps it speaks more to how the definition of fame has changed than anything else. The other aspect of this book that seems a bit jarring is in the end of the chapter titled "Immortality," which includes a call to accept Christ, complete with a prayerand the author's phone number to call to talk to him "about the new life you've just begun." Compared to the rest of the book, this tidbit feels heavy-handed and out of place, even jarring. There are many teens, including some Christians, who might be put off. These titles are recommended for public libraries who serve large populations of evangelical Christians, providing that they can afford to purchase both books, as it is hard to imagine a boy will pick up the title for girls or vice versa. re two seemingly different books with different VOYA Codes: 3Q 3P S (Readable without serious defects; Will appeal with pushing; Senior High, defined as grades 10 to 12). 2003, Baker Books, 128p,
— Susan Smith

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780801045196
Publisher:
Baker Publishing Group
Publication date:
03/01/2003
Pages:
128
Product dimensions:
5.26(w) x 8.08(h) x 0.55(d)
Age Range:
16 - 18 Years

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