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Player's Handbook 2 (D&D Core Rulebook Series)
     

Player's Handbook 2 (D&D Core Rulebook Series)

4.5 26
by Mike Mearls, Jeremy Crawford, James Wyatt
 

New classes, races, and other options for your D&D(R) game.

This book builds on the array of classes and races presented in the first Player's Handbook(R), adding both old favorites and new, never-before-seen options to the game.

The book adds a new power source for 4th Edition D&D; classes using the new primal power source include

Overview

New classes, races, and other options for your D&D(R) game.

This book builds on the array of classes and races presented in the first Player's Handbook(R), adding both old favorites and new, never-before-seen options to the game.

The book adds a new power source for 4th Edition D&D; classes using the new primal power source include the barbarian and the druid.

Player's Handbook 2 expands the range of options available to D&D players with new classes, races, powers, and other material.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780786950164
Publisher:
Wizards of the Coast
Publication date:
03/17/2009
Series:
D&D Core Rulebook Series
Pages:
224
Product dimensions:
8.40(w) x 11.00(h) x 0.60(d)

Customer Reviews

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Player's Handbook 2 (D&D Core Rulebook Series) 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 26 reviews.
Codex_of_Wisdom More than 1 year ago
This is a well made game. Most die-hard players will tell you that 4th Edition ruined Dungeons and Dragons, but it made it simpler to play and did little to make it more restricted. The beauty of this game is that you can do anything you want. And the game is not limited to fantasy and magic - with a little modification (there are plenty of online rules for free) you can play modern or sci-fi games with these rules. This book itself has player characters in it that use godly and ancient powers. It's a good book, but I would recommend the new box set that has this and the second book.
Wampameat More than 1 year ago
I like that the new options presented within are not just rehashes of old 3.5 material. It's almost all new stuff (a couple races are brought over from the Monster Manual), and most of it is very well done and very fun to play. My only complaint is that this was almost certainly developed at the same time as Arcana Power, and some of its material would have been appropriate here - better to be part of the 'base' class than only tacked on in the other book. Still, a lot of good stuff here.
Jheremy More than 1 year ago
While there isn't much in the way of new story, settings, or rules, there are updates to some existing skills and an introduction to summoning. More importantly, perhaps, there are five new races, eight new classes, 44 new paragon paths, and six new epic destinies to use. Many will enjoy the reintroduction of the bard with the new magical instruments and songblades for their use. Two of the five races are simply revised versions of races in the MONSTER MANUAL: the gnome, the longtooth shifter, and the razorclaw shifter. (The two shifters have been combined into versions of one race, similar to the five versions of the genasi in the FORGOTTEN REALMS PLAYER'S GUIDE.) Outside those things, there isn't much but a few new rituals. Backgrounds can add a nice touch to help complete a character, and they introduce social and spiritual backgrounds in addition to geographic ones like those in Forgotten Realms. The book isn't necessary unless you feel the need for more races and classes than you get in the original Core set, and if you'd like to explore the racial paragon paths. While it's not an imperative book to have, it's nice to see the thaneborn alternative to the barbarian, the introduction of the bard and the druid, and the other new classes within.
Respen_Starym More than 1 year ago
First off, the general content. The set up seemed logical, so no qualms there. The art was... well, less good. I haven't been a fan of fourth edition art in general, and its tendency to recycle old third edition art is a bit annoying. I loved the Avenger artwork, but otherwise felt rather meh about the overall product. Now to the actual content. Being new to 4th edition, and missing many of the classes left out by the the previous PHB, i was happy to see the treatments of the Druid, Bard, Sorcerer, and Barbarian. While i care less for the Barbarian, i was really impressed with the bard and the way they actually made it a part of the party, unlike third which, at high levels, the party buffs seem almost negligible. As for the druid, i am happy with its overall quality, though annoyed that it has lost its versatility. No more flying, without the paragon path, and the out of combat uses seem very limited... which, i suppose was to be expected. Also, i love the idea of the Avenger, and am interested to play one when i get the chance. The races section was well done, though the only new option that i was particularly interested in was the Shifter. Gnomes were no big loss to begin with (honestly, i only played a gnome once in 3e and was fine with that) and the shift from Deva to Aasimar was also a little disappointing. Interesting story element, but a bit too epic sounding for a low level game, plus aesthetically i was less pleased (though admittedly, it fit in with fourth editions attempts to move away from the humanesque creature with subtly.) Its good to have half-orcs back, but it seems odd that they have the +2 dex instead of con, never saw them as graceful. The re-introduction of Goliath from Races of the Wild was also a pleasant one, and i think they could easily fit into the world. Overall, i enjoyed the product, and think that i will get a good amount of use out of it. Worth the purchase if you plan on playing any 4th edition games. R.S.
niko718 More than 1 year ago
The races chosen are interesting. I like the way the materials were arranged this time. Races followed by Paragon Classes to race specific and them by classes. The new classes are well done...and the equipment are related to the classes in this book. Overall, I think it is a must buy for anyone interested in expanding their RPG fun.
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Great new races and possible classes.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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trhis was an excelent choice for expaning a dnd campain
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Brandonshire More than 1 year ago
Was quite happy with this initially, the new character classes are interesting, and seem pretty well balanced with the classes in the first Players Handbook, they'll make an interesting addition to any game, and give your players more options for each "role" in the party. These look like they will fill these roles pretty well, while providing fairly different styles of play. My copy however is about to be returned, as I found this morning that it is missing the last 31 pages (meaning it's missing some rule updates for the game generally, magic items and several other things). The table of contents, reviews, and the B&N website indicate that it should have 224 pages, however mine stops at page 193 in the midst of the new Feats. Hopefully I'll be able to return it quickly and mine is just a fluke. I would however suggest everyone who gets this check immediately to be sure that their copy is complete!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
With 8 new character classes and 5 new character races, this is a must have for any 4th Edition Dungeons and Dragons player or GM. Beautifully illustrated and designed, it's well laid out and very useful.
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