Playing for Change: Music and Musicians in the Service of Social Movements

Overview

Although music is known to be part of the great social movements that have rocked the world, its specific contribution to political struggle has rarely been closely analyzed. Is it truly the “lifeblood” of movements, as some have declared, or merely the entertainment between the speeches? Drawing on interviews, case studies, and musical and lyrical analysis, Rosenthal and Flacks offer a brilliant analysis and a wide-ranging look at the use of music in movements, in the U.S. and elsewhere, over the past hundred ...
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Overview

Although music is known to be part of the great social movements that have rocked the world, its specific contribution to political struggle has rarely been closely analyzed. Is it truly the “lifeblood” of movements, as some have declared, or merely the entertainment between the speeches? Drawing on interviews, case studies, and musical and lyrical analysis, Rosenthal and Flacks offer a brilliant analysis and a wide-ranging look at the use of music in movements, in the U.S. and elsewhere, over the past hundred years. From their interviews, the voices of Pete Seeger, Ani DiFranco, Tom Morello, Holly Near, and many others enliven this highly readable book.

"a complex, theoretical analysis of music and social movements...Recommended." -CHOICE

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781594517891
  • Publisher: Paradigm Publishers
  • Publication date: 4/28/2012
  • Pages: 330
  • Sales rank: 775,236
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Rob Rosenthal, Provost and Professor of Sociology at Wesleyan University, is the coauthor recently of Playing for Change: Music and Musicians in the Service of Social Movements and an editor of Pete Seeger: His Life in His Own Words.

Dick Flacks is Emeritus Professor of Sociology at University of California–Santa Barbara. His work focuses on roots and strategies of social movements and the American left Making History: The American Left and the American Mind (1988), the social psychology of political activism Beyond the Barricades (1989), and culture and social movements. He’s produced a weekly radio program on music and politics since 1982.

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments vi

Part I An Introduction to the Music-Movement Link 1

1 You Can't Scare Me, I'm Sticking to the Union 3

Part II The Meanings of Music 37

2 Aretha Franklin Sings to Charlie Manson 39

3 Context 67

4 The Audience and Reception 91

5 The Meanings of Music: Some Reconsiderations and Implications 103

Part III The Functions of Musicking for Social Movements 121

6 Serving the Committed 123

7 Education 143

8 Conversion and Recruitment 157

9 Mobilization 173

10 How Musicking Harms Movements 181

11 What Makes a Difference? 197

12 What Is to Be Sung (or Played)? 211

Notes 257

References 291

Index 311

About the Authors 323

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