Playing the Game: Inside Athletic Recruiting in the Ivy League

Playing the Game: Inside Athletic Recruiting in the Ivy League

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by Chris Lincoln
     
 

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Playing The Game offers readers the first detailed, inside look at exactly how the
athletic recruiting game is played by coaches, prospective students, parents,
administrators, admission officers, and even college presidents in the Ivy League
and its Division III counterpart, the NESCAC. Here is the inside story on why this
specialized process has… See more details below

Overview


Playing The Game offers readers the first detailed, inside look at exactly how the
athletic recruiting game is played by coaches, prospective students, parents,
administrators, admission officers, and even college presidents in the Ivy League
and its Division III counterpart, the NESCAC. Here is the inside story on why this
specialized process has caused so much controversy on campus and off.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"A fun read for anyone interested in the inner workings of college sports, and a must read for anyone interested in being an Ivy League athlete."  —The Nashua Telegraph

The Nashua Telegraph
A fun read for anyone interested in the inner workings of college sports; and a must read for anyone interested in being an Ivy League athlete.

Publishers Weekly
You don't need an Ivy League education to appreciate Lincoln's in-depth look at recruiting in this elite conference, but it helps. A good part of Lincoln's analysis centers on the Academic Index (A.I.), a system devised by Ivy schools that uses stratified bands to limit the number of student athletes schools can admit in certain academic ranges. The A.I. formula is complex and serves to make a difficult recruiting situation for Ivy coaches even harder, Lincoln argues. Because the Ivy entrance requirements are higher than for most other colleges in the nation, before the A.I. was introduced in the early 1980s Ivy coaches had a limited pool of athletes to choose from. Despite being refined several times, the A.I. is still flawed, and Lincoln proposes that it be replaced by a firm minimum standard that would simplify the recruiting process for both the schools and students. Another important factor Lincoln examines in the recruiting wars is financial aid. Since Harvard, Yale and Princeton have the largest endowments, they are better positioned to secure the students they have targeted. In this sound book, Lincoln finds that while the recruiting process is cleaner than most other Division I conferences, the Ivy League is not without its own problems. (July) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780972202664
Publisher:
Nomad Press
Publication date:
04/01/2004
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
257
Sales rank:
381,063
Product dimensions:
6.32(w) x 9.12(h) x 0.66(d)

What People are saying about this

Christopher Merrill
Here is the story behind the story of what we see on the field. A fascinating look at the world of sports.
Michelle Hernandez
It's rare to read such a daring and informative book that manages to walk the line between 'exposing' hidden practices and representing the coaches' side of things too.
Bill Littlefield
Chris Lincoln has done an exceptional job of explaining a recruiting process that will surprise lots of folks who think they know all about the Ivy League.
Alexander Wolff
Part explainer, part expose and part polemic, [this book] fills a huge gap in our knowledge of how college sports work.
Fred Hargadon
There's informative reading here for everyone involved in intercollegiate athletics, from prospective student-athletes through college presidents.
Paul Witteman
The Ivy League's dirty, little, athletic secrets are exposed. . .and Ivy presidents will be blinking and scrambling for safety.
Tom Wolfe
[This book] is a serious, straight-faced � and hilarious � account of the Maypole dance the coaches have to do every year in order to get even half-decent athletes into the Ivy League.

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