Please Say Please!: Penguin's Guide to Manners

Please Say Please!: Penguin's Guide to Manners

by Margery Cuyler, Will Hillenbrand, Will Hillenbrand
     
 

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Rollicking text and a mischievous crew of playful animal guests make for an irresistible first guide to manners.

Penguin is having a party, and his nine adorable animal guests aren't sure about their manners. When Lion is served cauliflower, he says, "I hate cauliflower. EW!" Is that right? No, he should say, "I'll try some. MMM, NOT BAD!" From one silly incident

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Overview

Rollicking text and a mischievous crew of playful animal guests make for an irresistible first guide to manners.

Penguin is having a party, and his nine adorable animal guests aren't sure about their manners. When Lion is served cauliflower, he says, "I hate cauliflower. EW!" Is that right? No, he should say, "I'll try some. MMM, NOT BAD!" From one silly incident to another, Hippo, Elephant, et al learn where to put your napkin (not on your head), how to sip your milk (not spray it), and when to tell a joke (NOT when your mouth is full!). Proper Penguin's patience is sorely tried, but by the time they say good-bye, his young guests have even learned to say, "Thank you!" Is that right? Yes, that's right!

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Penguin wants to be a gracious dinner host he's even perfectly dressed for the part but he has some of the most uncouth acquaintances in the entire animal world. Pig wipes his muddy hooves on the tablecloth ("Oh. Yuck!"), Elephant sprays milk through his trunk ("Splat!") and Giraffe engages in extreme burping ("Bur-r-r-r-r-r-r-p!"). "Is that right?" asks Cuyler (previously paired with Hillenbrand for The Biggest Best Snowman), after each faux pas (which include both individual and group gaffes). "No, that's wrong," she explains, and then rewinds the tape, so to speak, and shows what happens when some basic painless etiquette is applied to each situation. Giraffe, for example, can't totally suppress her burp, but she does manage to cover her mouth and minimize the volume, which prompts Penguin to clap his hands. Hillenbrand matches Cuyler's simple, crisp text by filling in his bold ink outlines with softly textured watercolors, streamlining the characters' distinguishing features and giving them a doodle-like spontaneity. By sticking with the same straight-on perspective of Penguin's long dining room table throughout the book, the illustrator stages a veritable smorgasbord of rotten manners. As in many such books, however, the good behavior wins the approval, but the bad behavior supplies the fun. Ages 3-up. (Apr.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
An Emily Post for the toddler set? Absolutely—and a welcome one at that! Margery Cuyler's way with a minimum amount of just the right, most practical words is again used to best advantage as Penguin hosts a dinner party. Cuyler's kid-friendly rules ("When a pig comes to the table, he should wipe his muddy hooves on the tablecloth. OH. YUCK! Is that right? No. That's wrong.") are geared at just the correct level for acceptance by hyperactive little ones. So Pig washes his hooves before dinner, Hippo learns how to use a napkin, and Lion graciously tastes a new kind of food. With "gimme gimmes," gulps, and "bur-r-r-r-r-r-r-ps," the dinner party progresses from chaos to civility. Will Hillenbrand's cavorting animals done in pen, ink, and crayon on vellum (the vellum is a nice touch, adding some interesting textures) enhance the fun. This is a must purchase for parents ready to move beyond the McDonald's stage of dining experiences. 2004, Scholastic, Ages 2 to 6.
—Kathleen Karr
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2-This delightful book reinforces polite behavior by showing what not to do. Brightly colored animal friends come to Penguin's house for dinner. They have terrible table manners, and the playful text asks young listeners to consider their conduct. For instance, "When it's time for a bear to eat, she should grab her spoon and throw it across the room.- Is that right? No, that's wrong.- she should use her spoon to taste her honey." Penguin always steers his guests in the right direction, and the silliness of the characters' antics will appeal to children. The pen-and-ink and crayon drawings are crisp and clear, and show lots of action. Perfect for storytime, this offering will also be a favorite with parents, proving that learning manners can be fun.-Janet M. Bair, Trumbull Library, CT Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
The table manners of Penguin's dinner guests are under scrutiny in this delightful look at mealtime behavior. Penguin has invited his friends to his house for dinner. Do they barge in without knocking? No! They need to knock first and wait to be greeted. Pig learns that the tablecloth is not for cleaning hooves; those should be washed before he comes to the table. "I hate cauliflower. Ew!" is not an appropriate response when offered something. Instead, try a little bit; it might become a favorite. Covering most of the common toddler and preschool misbehaviors, from burping and using a napkin, to talking with a full mouth and using utensils, this is a must for all parents struggling with the table antics of their small children. Hillenbrand's double-page spreads are simple; outlines and basic colors make it easy to identify the animals and scene, but do not detract from the focus: mealtime behaviors. A must for every children's library-and for the frustrated parents of young ones. (Picture book. 3-7)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780590292245
Publisher:
Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date:
02/25/2004
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.80(w) x 9.90(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
3 - 5 Years

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