Plot and Point of View in the Iliad

( 1 )

Overview


Plot and Point of View in the Iliad argues that Homer, the poet of the Iliad, may be fully distinguished from the narrator of Homeric poetry, who is the Muse, and also from the heroes and heroines who live within the world of the story. The Iliad is a poem with a particularly rich and complex structure of perspectives, and as point of view as an element of storytelling has garnered tremendous interest in this century, critical attention has taken up this question in relation to...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (5) from $8.01   
  • New (1) from $172.66   
  • Used (4) from $8.01   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$172.66
Seller since 2011

Feedback rating:

(859)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Brand new and unread! Join our growing list of satisfied customers!

Ships from: Phoenix, MD

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview


Plot and Point of View in the Iliad argues that Homer, the poet of the Iliad, may be fully distinguished from the narrator of Homeric poetry, who is the Muse, and also from the heroes and heroines who live within the world of the story. The Iliad is a poem with a particularly rich and complex structure of perspectives, and as point of view as an element of storytelling has garnered tremendous interest in this century, critical attention has taken up this question in relation to Homer's poem.

Robert Rabel argues that in different ways, both the Muse-narrator and the poet manipulate point of view in order to discover and define the meaning of the Iliad, placing various ways of thinking in competing and complementary relationships with one another. In the process, the Muse-narrator produces a sophisticated and compelling analysis of the tragic limitations of life in accordance with the heroic ethic. In the end, the poet provides a demonstration of the extent to which reality can only be grasped and apprehended in epic poetry through images that are constructed from various individual perspectives.

This volume will be of interest to students of comparative and classical literature, philosophers, and readers of Homeric epic. All Greek passages are translated, and discussions of technical language are kept to a minimum.

Robert J. Rabel is Associate Professor of Classics, University of Kentucky.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780472107681
  • Publisher: University of Michigan Press
  • Publication date: 2/1/1998
  • Pages: 264
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Table of Contents

Ch. 1 Plot and Point of View in the Iliad 1
Ch. 2 Book 1: The "Beginning" of the Iliad 33
Ch. 3 Books 2-8: Helen and Glory 59
Ch. 4 Book 9: The Desires of Achilleus 115
Ch. 5 Books 10-17: Need and Desire 135
Ch. 6 Books 18-24: Plot and Subplot Converge 163
Conclusion 211
Bibliography 217
Index 231
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 27, 2001

    Outstanding contribution to modern scholarship on Homer's Iliad

    I teach a course on Homer's Iliad to law students at Arizona State University College of Law. I use Richmond Lattimore's translation (Univ. of Chicago Press, 1951) and rely on a variety of works in English by American scholars to help students understand the complexity and depth of Homer's great work, including, for example, Seth Schein's The Mortal Hero; James Redfield's Nature and Culture in the Iliad; and Malcolm Wilcock's A Companion to the Iliad. To this list I must now add Robert Rabel's Plot and Point of View in the Iliad. This is, quite simply, a wonderful work; brilliant, insightful and illuminating. It illustrates aspects of the Iliad I had never seen before. Rabel applies Aristotle's theories and modern scholarship on perspective in narrative literature to show how multiple points of view are used throughout the Iliad, as the Muses, the narrator (author), and the characters each describe events from their own perspectives. Rabel also reveals the different kinds of heroic behavior present in the poem: the cooperative heroism of the hero when on the defensive in a city under seige (and in the Iliad, this includes the Achaians in their camp), and the competitive, individualistic heroism of the heroes when they are on the attack and trying to win glory for themselves. This is an important point. It allows the reader to understand Homer's portrait of the conflict between a hero's desire for individual honor and the group's need for social cohesion. Finally, this book makes accessible to the general reader a wealth of Homeric scholarship from the past decade that Rabel mines for their insights and generously includes in his footnotes and his bibliography. For the reader who has Greek, Rabel includes quotations from the original text alongside his own translations. For the Greekless reader (like myself), the Greek citations are an ornament and not a distraction in the text. In conclusion, let me repeat, this is a wonderful book. I felt about it as did Keats, on first looking into Chapman's Homer. I recommend it without reservation.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)