Plug-in Drug: Television, Computers, and Family Life

Plug-in Drug: Television, Computers, and Family Life

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by Marie Winn
     
 

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How does the passive act of watching television and other electronic media-regardless of their content-affect a developing child's relationship to the real world? Focusing on this crucial question, Marie Winn takes a compelling look at television's impact on children and the family. Winn's classic study has been extensively updated to address the new media

Overview

How does the passive act of watching television and other electronic media-regardless of their content-affect a developing child's relationship to the real world? Focusing on this crucial question, Marie Winn takes a compelling look at television's impact on children and the family. Winn's classic study has been extensively updated to address the new media landscape, including new sections on: computers, video games, the VCR, the V-Chip and other control devices, TV programming for babies, television and physical health, and gaining control of your TV.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Still the definitive work on how and why television harms the minds and spirits of children." —Howard Gardner, Harvard Graduate School of Education and co-author of Good Work: Where Excellence and Ethics Meet

"Extremely important...ought to be read by every parent." —Los Angeles Times

"No one has captured the devastating effects of television the way Marie Winn has. The latest research coupled with candid and inspiring correspondence from actual families make this the best edition yet."—Jim Trelease, author of The Read-Aloud Handbook

Library Journal
After 25 years, Winn (Children Without Childhood) has completely revised and updated her landmark study of the influence of television on children and family life by incorporating findings based on recent research and investigating the impact of the home computer, the VCR, and the video game terminal. She has also shifted the focus from the TV programs children watch to the negative effects of television on children's play, imagination, and school achievement. Although Winn pinpoints many key shortcomings of television, this study is not argumentative; Winn instead aims to stress the quality of family life without television, to show educators and parents how to control the medium, and to offer practical suggestions on how to improve family life not dependent on television. This refreshingly candid and inviting study is highly recommended for both public and academic libraries. Leroy Hommerding, Fort Myers Beach P.L. Dist., FL Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Booknews
This is the new edition of a book criticizing the effects of television on children, their schooling, and family relationships. The author argues that pretty much nothing has changed since the book was first published in 1977. Expanding her analysis to other electronic media, she suggests that many of the same problems are associated with the use of other electronic media. In chapters new to this edition, she discusses computers in the classrooms; video games, VCRS, and other electronic playthings. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780142001080
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
04/30/2002
Edition description:
Twenty Fifth Anniversary Edition
Pages:
352
Sales rank:
760,172
Product dimensions:
5.00(w) x 7.75(h) x 0.75(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Meet the Author

Marie Winn has written thirteen books, among them Children Without Childhood, Unplugging the Plug-In Drug, and Red-Tails in Love. She currently writes a column about nature for the Wall Street Journal. She has two grown children and four grandchildren who are growing up without television.

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Plug-in Drug: Television, Computers, and Family Life 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
We didn't get a TV until I was in the 7th or 8th grade. Before it came I didn't want it. And after it came I hated it because it destroyed our family life. 'Before' we used to talk to each other. 'After' we mostly watched the TV in silence.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book does not share clear evidence proving the opinions she gives. I have read David Gauntlett's book on TV Living and it is an excellent counter to this arguement that television is a bad influence on a child's behavior. He uses great examples and explaination and I recommend reading it to get a different view rather then the 'usual' arguement that television is bad for children.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a great book. I have a 2 year old son who I have not let watch television. He is wonderfully creative and has an incredible attention span. This book really reinforces the value of not letting your children become addicted to TV and media. It has helped me to cut down on my veiwing also. As a teacher and a parent I recommend this as a "Must Read"!!!!!