Plunkitt of Tammany Hall: A Series of Very Plain Talks on Very Practical Politics [NOOK Book]

Overview

This classic work offers the unblushing, unvarnished wit and wisdom of one of the most fascinating figures ever to play the American political game and win. George Washington Plunkitt rose from impoverished beginnings to become ward boss of the Fifteenth Assembly District in New York, a key player in the powerhouse political team of Tammany Hall, and a millionaire.



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Plunkitt of Tammany Hall: A Series of Very Plain Talks on Very Practical Politics

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Overview

This classic work offers the unblushing, unvarnished wit and wisdom of one of the most fascinating figures ever to play the American political game and win. George Washington Plunkitt rose from impoverished beginnings to become ward boss of the Fifteenth Assembly District in New York, a key player in the powerhouse political team of Tammany Hall, and a millionaire.



In a series of utterly frank talks given at his headquarters at Graziano’s bootblack stand inside the New York County Court House, he revealed to a sharp-eared and sympathetic reporter named William L. Riordon the secrets of political success as practiced and perfected by Tammany Hall titans.



The result is not only a volume that reveals more about our political system than does a shelf load of civics textbooks, but also an irresistible portrait of a man who would feel happily at home playing ball with today’s lobbyists and kingmakers, trading votes for political and financial favors.



Doing for twentieth-century America what Machiavelli did for Renaissance Italy, and as entertaining as it is instructive, Plunkitt of Tammany Hall is essential reading for those who prefer twenty-twenty vision to rose-colored glasses in viewing how our government works and why.


Originally published in 1905, this book is the collected wisdom of G.W. Plunkitt, ward boss of that infamous turn-of-the-century New York City political machine, Tammany Hall. A major school adoption title. Reissue.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781101099926
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 11/1/1995
  • Sold by: Penguin Group
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 128
  • Sales rank: 248,981
  • File size: 263 KB

Meet the Author

Peter Quinn is the author of the novel Banished Children of Eve (winner of an American Book Award) and previously served as speechwriter for New York governors Hugh Carey and Mario Cuomo. A third-generation New Yorker whose granparents were born in Ireland, he is currently Editorial Director for Time Warner and lives in Hastings, New York.


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Table of Contents

Foreword
Preface
Introduction: How George Washington Plunkitt Became Plunkitt of Tammany Hall 1
Pt. 1 The Document 43
Preface 45
A Tribute 48
Plunkitt of Tammany Hall 49
Pt. 2 Related Materials 103
"George W. Plunkitt," in Tammany Biographies, New York Evening Post, 1894 105
"Hon. Geo. W. Plunkitt," The Tammany Times, September 21, 1895 106
"Lift the Plunkitt Mortgage!" A pamphlet published by Plunkitt's successful opponent in the 1904 election to state Senate 109
"Graft, Cries M'Manus; Not Me, Says Plunkitt," New York Times, June 8, 1905 111
Review of Plunkitt of Tammany Hall, American Monthly Review of Reviews, November 1905 113
Review of Plunkitt of Tammany Hall, Public Opinion, October 7, 1905 113
Plunkitt Obituary, The Nation, December 3, 1924 115
Jane Addams, "Why the Ward Boss Rules," The Outlook, April 2, 1898 117
Lincoln Steffens, "New York: Good Government in Danger," McClure's, November 1903 123
App. A Plunkitt Chronology (1842-1924) 135
Selected Bibliography 137
Index 140
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Sort by: Showing 1 – 3 of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2003

    corruption as a public good

    In history's rear view mirror, George Washington Plunkitt appears to be just another guy in a long line of corrupt politicians. There's no denying that he was corrupt, but as William Riordon recounts, Plunkitt honestly believed that he was not doing the public any harm. In fact, he believed that there was such a thing as honest graft, a sort of victimless crime. Certainly this was a self-serving philosophy, but there is a sincerity in his discourses that defies any trace of hypocrisy. His belief that Tammany Hall was a benevolent organization that served the poor and needy put a bemused smile on my face. After all, Plunkitt doesn't see or doesn't admit to seeing that the robbing of public funds through honest or dishonest graft is what contributed to the social problems, like unemployment, poverty and crime, which for the most part put the needy and poor in their predicament in the first place. But he absolves himself from his actions by his now-famous defense, 'I seen my opportunities and I took 'em.' And this is what makes Plunkitt such a congenial and magnetic man, what makes him so damned likeable. You KNOW he's a thief, you KNOW he contributed to the misery of thousands. Yet his playful, plain-speaking style, his candidness about his activities, his wit, and, at times, his goofiness, make him different from other Tammany leaders like Boss Tweed, say, or Charlie Murphy. He's more in line with Big Tim Sullivan or James J. Walker. George Washington Plunkitt was a charmer, no doubt about it. William Riordon was obviously under his spell. And the Johnson/Boswell comparison is very valid. It is difficult to maintain the utter contempt one should have for this thief. And yet... I would have loved to have had drunk with him at Hoffmann's bar and let him speak on for hours. Like Riordon, I think I would have been hypnotized too. NB--Peter Quinn's brilliant Introduction serves the book well.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 10, 2009

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    Posted August 15, 2013

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