Pocketbook Politics: Economic Citizenship in Twentieth-Century America

Pocketbook Politics: Economic Citizenship in Twentieth-Century America

by Meg Jacobs, Gary Gerstle, William Chafe
     
 

"This is one of the most ambitious, original, and wisest books about power in twentieth-century America that I have read in years. With her narrative about the vital politics of the cost of living, Meg Jacobs has transformed the scholarship about modern liberals and their opponents on the Right."—Michael Kazin, author of The Populist Persuasion: An

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Overview

"This is one of the most ambitious, original, and wisest books about power in twentieth-century America that I have read in years. With her narrative about the vital politics of the cost of living, Meg Jacobs has transformed the scholarship about modern liberals and their opponents on the Right."—Michael Kazin, author of The Populist Persuasion: An American History

"Meg Jacobs has produced an extraordinarily lucid analysis of how consumers allied with trade unions to influence prices and wages. In a provocative and mind-bending book, she demonstrates how the efforts of quite ordinary people led to political agendas that shaped the twentiet-century state."—Alice Kessler-Harris, author of In Pursuit of Equity: Gender and the Quest for Economic Citizenship in Twentieth-Century America

"Written with unusual narrative power, Pocketbook Politics makes the political economy of purchasing power and mass consumption central to our understanding of modern America. In achieving a fresh analytical narrative of economic ideas, policymaking, and popular politics, this major book forces an engagement with issues and historical understandings long cast in other terms. It also sets a standard for the new political history its author has done so much to promote."—Ira Katznelson, Ruggles Professor of Political Science and History, Columbia University

"Meg Jacobs has written a highly significant book that, by illuminating major transitions in twentieth-century politics, recasts our understanding of the relationship of politics, state building, economic policy, labor unions, and consumer culture."—Daniel Horowitz, author of The Anxieties of Affluence: Critiques of American Consumer Culture, 1939-1979

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780691130415
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
Publication date:
02/20/2007
Series:
Politics and Society in Twentieth-Century America Series
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
368
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 9.10(h) x 1.00(d)

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations ix

Acknowledgments xi

Introduction

Economic Citizenship in the Twentieth Century 1

PART I. THE HIGH COST OF LIVING AND THE RISE OF POCKETBOOK POLITICS, 1900-1930

Chapter One: From the Bargain Basement to the Bargaining Table, 1900-1917 15

Chapter Two: Business without a Buyer, 1917-1930 53

PART II. PURCHASING POWER TO THE PEOPLE, 1930-1940

Chapter Three: The New Deal and the Problem of Prices, 1930-1935 95

Chapter Four: The New Deal and the Problem of Wages, 1935-1940 136

PART III. THE EVILS OF INFLATION IN WAR AND PEACE, 1940-1960

Chapter Five: The Consumer Goes to War, 1940-1946 179

Chapter Six: Pocketbook Politics in an Age of Inflation, 1946-1960 221

Epilogue: Back to Bargain Hunting 262

Notes 266

Index 327

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