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Poems Have Roots
     

Poems Have Roots

by Lilian Moore
 
These poems have their roots in the earth, reflecting what award-winning poet Lilian Moore has experienced in her encounters with nature. In her notes at the back of the book, Moore explains how each poems grew--what event inspired it, what led her to create these succinct revelations of her thoughts and feelings.

Overview

These poems have their roots in the earth, reflecting what award-winning poet Lilian Moore has experienced in her encounters with nature. In her notes at the back of the book, Moore explains how each poems grew--what event inspired it, what led her to create these succinct revelations of her thoughts and feelings.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Carolyn Mott Ford
These poems have their roots in nature and illustrate how deeply rooted is the poet's love and respect for the streams, mountains and trees, as well as the animal inhabitants. Simple eloquence will carry readers along, allowing them to see the frozen waterfall, the dusting of snow and the volcano island. "Pilgrim Flower" carries the theme of roots further. As the pilgrims left their native lands on a journey to a new life, they carried many emotional and material remembrances of their homeland. They also carried the flower called Queen Anne's Lace, which took root and stands along the roadside "as if waiting to bow to a phantom queen." Included are notes offering descriptions and locations of the actual inspirations for many of the poems. "Waterfall" was written in recognition of a small scenic waterfall the author often passed while driving through the Hudson Valley in New York State while "A River Doesn't Have to Die" is a celebration of the reclaiming of the Hudson River from the pollution which threatened to destroy it. The poems are meant to take root in the hearts and minds of the young people who read them.
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
Gr 3-8--A collection of 17 new offerings by the prolific and well-known poet. "The sun's going down/with a great hurrah" begins the first. "A spectacular fray" with no admission "in the theater of the sky!" Succeeding selections look at the sea, snow, a waterfall, birds, frogs, trees, etc. There's nothing unusual here except for skill and craft--minute observations pithily recorded. Humor surfaces in "The Automated Bird Watcher," where an operator says, "Press one" to see the nest, "two" to see the eggs. There's a triumphant note in the six brief stanzas of "The Tree in the Tub." The little fir once wore "winking lights" and gathered "boxes of/surprises/around itself." But now, unlike its cut-down counterparts, it stands, "piney and green and/alive." A deceptively short poem about Queen Anne's Lace suggests a whole history: the "Pilgrim Flower" stands patient and tall, as if waiting to bow to a "phantom queen." Not every effort is equally successful. The lengthy "A River Doesn't Have to Die" is too prosaic, a shade didactic. Nor do the author's notes at the end, detailing the origins of some of the poems, add enjoyment, though they might prove useful in a writing class. Hills's simple sketches and shadow prints catch the spirit of the work. Indeed, the small size and unassuming tone of this volume are part of its understated appeal.--Ellen D. Warwick, Winchester Public Library, MA
Kirkus Reviews
Moore (Sunflakes, 1992, etc.) produces a new, small volume of poems that fits nicely in the hand. Each poem—none longer that three pages and most only two—is, like the title, a reflection on nature. Some mourn, and some rejoice, but all share the response to what Moore sees before her: a frozen waterfall, a full moon, a thunderstorm. Environmental messages are occasionally heavy-handed ("Unpoison the sea!" and "Where are the frogs?"), and the use of exclamation points makes for unnecessary clunks most of the time. "The Automated Bird Watcher" is hilarious ("Press One/To see the clutch of/eggs she laid"); "Pilgrim Flower" reminds readers, exquisitely, that the pilgrims brought the wildflower Queen Anne's Lace to these shores.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780689800290
Publisher:
Atheneum Books for Young Readers
Publication date:
09/01/1997
Edition description:
1 ED
Pages:
48
Product dimensions:
4.78(w) x 7.78(h) x 0.36(d)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

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