Poems, Poets, Poetry: An Introduction and Anthology / Edition 2

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Overview

Many students today are puzzled by the meaning and purpose of poetry. Poems, Poets, Poetry demystifies the form and introduces students to its artistry and pleasures, using methods that Helen Vendler has successfully used herself over her long, celebrated career. Guided by Vendler’s erudite yet down-to-earth approach, students at all levels can benefit from her authoritative instruction. Her blend of new and canonical poets includes the broadest selection of new and multi-racial poets offered by any introductory text. Comprehensive and astute, this text engages students in effective ways of reading — and taking delight in — poetry.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780312257064
  • Publisher: Bedford/St. Martin's
  • Publication date: 1/28/2002
  • Edition description: Second Edition
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 715
  • Product dimensions: 5.74 (w) x 9.31 (h) x 1.16 (d)

Meet the Author

HELEN VENDLER, critic and scholar of English-language poetry from the seventeenth century to the present, is A. Kingsley Porter University Professor at Harvard University–the first woman to hold a University Professorship, the highest academic distinction Harvard bestows. She was poetry critic of The New Yorker from 1978-1990, and was a member of the Pulitzer Prize Board from 1990-1999, often serving, before those years, on Pulitzer Prize juries for poetry. She has written ground-breaking scholarly studies on the work of William Butler Yeats, Wallace Stevens, George Herbert, John Keats, William Shakespeare, and Seamus Heaney, and has received the National Book Critics' Circle Award for Criticism in 1981, as well as the Truman Capote Prize and the Lowell Prize of the MLA. Her criticism has been collected in several volumes, including Part of Nature, Part of Us, The Music of What Happens, and Soul Says.

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Table of Contents

Preface: About This Book

Brief Contents

Contents

Chronological Contents

About Poets and Poetry

PART I. AN INTRODUCTION TO POETRY

1. The Poem as Life

The Private Life

William Blake, Infant Sorrow

Louise Glück, The School Children

E. E. Cummings, in Just-

NEW Robert Hayden, Those Winter Sundays

Walt Whitman, Hours Continuing Long

Wallace Stevens, The Plain Sense of Things

The Public Life

Michael Harper, American History

Charles Simic, Old Couple

Robert Lowell, Skunk Hour

Nature and Time

Anonymous, The Cuckoo Song

Dave Smith, The Spring Poem

John Keats, The Human Seasons

William Shakespeare, Sonnet 60 (Like as the waves make towards the pebbled shore)

In Brief: The Poem as Life

Reading Other Poems

Sir Thomas Wyatt, They Flee from Me

Ben Jonson, On My First Son

John Milton, On the Late Massacre in Piedmont

John Keats, When I Have Fears

Emily Dickinson, A narrow Fellow in the grass

Langston Hughes, Theme for English B

Dylan Thomas, Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night

Sylvia Plath, Daddy

Rita Dove, Flash Cards

Yusef Komunyakaa, Facing It

Julia Alvarez, Homecoming

2. The Poem as Arranged Life

The Private Life

William Blake, Infant Joy

William Blake, Infant Sorrow

Louise Glück, The School Children

E. E. Cummings, in Just-

Robert Hayden, Those Winter Sundays

Walt Whitman, Hours Continuing Long

Wallace Stevens, The Plain Sense of Things

The Public Life

Michael S. Harper, American History

Charles Simic, Old Couple

Robert Lowell, Skunk Hour

Nature and Time

Anonymous, The Cuckoo Song

Dave Smith, The Spring Poem

John Keats, The Human Seasons

William Shakespeare, Sonnet 60 (Like as the waves make towards the pebbled shore)

In Brief: The Poem as Arranged Life

Reading Other Poems

Anonymous, Lord Randal

William Shakespeare, Sonnet 29 (When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes)

Chidiock Tichborne, Tichborne's Elegy

John Donne, A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning

Robert Herrick, Upon Julia's Clothes

George Herbert, Love (III)

Walt Whitman, A Noiseless Patient Spider

Thomas Hardy, The Convergence of the Twain

Robert Frost, The Road Not Taken

Margaret Atwood, Footnote to the Amnesty Report on Torture

Marilyn Nelson, Live Jazz, Franklin Park Zoo

3. Poems as Pleasure

Rhythm

Rhyme

Ben Jonson, On Gut

Structure

William Carlos Williams, Poem

Gwendolyn Brooks, We Real Cool

Images

William Blake, London

Argument

Christopher Marlowe, The Passionate Shepherd to His Love

Walter Ralegh, The Nymph's Reply to the Shepherd

Poignancy

William Wordsworth, A Slumber Did My Spirit Seal

Wisdom

A New Language

Finding Yourself

In Brief: Poems as Pleasure

Reading Other Poems

William Shakespeare, Sonnet 130 (My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun)

Robert Herrick, To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time

William Blake, The Sick Rose

Gerard Manley Hopkins, Pied Beauty

Thomas Hardy, The Darkling Thrush

Robert Frost, After Apple-Picking

Robert Frost, Unharvested

D.H. Lawrence, Snake

William Carlos Williams, The Dance

Theodore Roethke, My Papa's Waltz

Derek Walcott, The Season of Phantasmal Peace

Elizabeth Alexander, Nineteen

4. Describing Poems

Poetic Kinds

Narrative versus Lyric; Narrative as Lyric

Adrienne Rich, Necessities of Life

Philip Larkin, Talking in Bed

Classifying Lyric Poems

Content genres

Emily Dickinson, The Heart asks Pleasure—first—

Speech Acts

Carl Sandburg, Grass

Outer Form

Line Width

Rhythm

Poem Length

Combinatorial Form Names

Inner Structural Form

Sentences

Robert Herrick, The Argument of His Book

Person

Agency

Randall Jarrell, The Death of the Ball Turret Gunner

Tenses

William Wordsworth, A Slumber Did My Spirit Seal

Images, or Sensuous Words

Sylvia Plath, Metaphors

Exploring a Poem

John Keats, Upon First Looking into Chapman's Homer

In Brief: Describing Poems

Reading Other Poems

William Shakespeare, Sonnet 129 (Th' expense of spirit in a waste of shame)

George Herbert, Easter Wings

Andrew Marvell, The Garden

John Milton, When I Consider How My Light is Spent

Anne Bradstreet, To My Dear and Loving Husband

John Keats, Ode to a Nightingale

Matthew Arnold, Dover Beach

Robert Frost, Mending Wall

Ezra Pound, The River Merchant's Wife: A Letter

Mark Strand, Courtship

Seamus Heaney, From the Frontier of Writing

Jorie Graham, San Sepolcro

Sherman Alexie, Evolution

5. The Play of Language

Sound Units

Word Roots

Words

Sentences

Robert Frost, Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

Emily Dickinson, The Heart asks Pleasure—first—

Implication

The Ordering of Language

George Herbert, Prayer (I)

William Shakespeare, Sonnet 66 (Tired with all these, for restful death I cry)

Michael Drayton, Since there's no help

In Brief: The Play of Language

Reading Other Poems

John Donne, Holy Sonnet 14 (Batter my heart, three-personed God; for You)

John Keats, To Autumn

Robert Browning, My Last Duchess

Henry Reed, Naming of Parts

William Butler Yeats, The Wild Swans at Coole

Wallace Stevens, The Emperor of Ice-Cream

H.D., Oread

E.E. Cummings, r-p-o-p-h-e-s-s-a-g-r

Elizabeth Bishop, One Art

Joy Harjo, Song for Deer and Myself to Return On

Lorna Dee Cervantes, Poema para los Californios Muertos

6. Constructing a Self

Multiple Aspects

William Shakespeare, Sonnet 30 (When to the sessions of sweet silent thought)

Change of Discourse

Space and Time

Seamus Heaney, Mid-Term Break

Testimony

Motivations

Typicality

Tone as a Marker of Selfhood

Gerard Manley Hopkins, Spring and Fall

Imagination

Emily Dickinson, I heard a Fly buzz—when I died—

Persona

William Butler Yeats, Crazy Jane Talks with the Bishop

In Brief: Constructing a Self

Reading Other Poems

John Dryden, Sylvia the Fair

Walt Whitman, I Saw in Louisiana a Live-Oak Growing

Emily Dickinson, I'm Nobody! Who are you?

William Butler Yeats, An Irish Airman Foresees His Death

Thomas Hardy, The Ruined Maid

T. S. Eliot, The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

William Carlos Williams, To Elsie

Countee Cullen, Heritage

Anne Sexton, Her Kind

Charles Wright, Self-Portrait

Jane Kenyon, Otherwise

Carl Phillips, Africa Says

7. Poetry and Social Identity

Adrienne Rich, Mother-in-Law

Adrienne Rich, Prospective Immigrants Please Note

Langston Hughes, Genius Child

Langston Hughes, Me and the Mule

Langston Hughes, High to Low

Seamus Heaney, Terminus

In Brief: Poetry and Social Identity

Reading Other Poems

Robert Southwell, The Burning Babe

Thomas Nashe, A Litany in Time of Plague

Anne Bradstreet, A Letter to Her Husband Absent Upon Public Employment

William Blake, The Little Black Boy

Edward Lear, How Pleasant to Know Mr. Lear

Gerard Manley Hopkins, Felix Randal

Sylvia Plath, The Applicant

David Mura, An Argument: On 1942

Rita Dove, Wingfoot Lake

Sheila Ortiz Taylor, The Way Back

8. History and Regionality

History

William Wordsworth, A slumber did my spirit seal

Robert Lowell, The March 1

Langston Hughes, World War II

Wilfred Owen, Dulce et Decorum Est

Regionality

Sherman Alexie, On the Amtrak from Boston to New York City

William Wordsworth, Composed upon Westminster Bridge, September 3, 1802

In Brief: History and Regionality

Reading Other Poems

Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Kubla Khan

William Wordsworth, Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey

John Keats, Ode on a Grecian Urn

William Butler Yeats, Easter 1916

Wallace Stevens, Anecdote of the Jar

Robert Lowell, For the Union Dead

Robert Hayden, Night, Death, Mississippi

W.S. Merwin, The Asians Dying

Derek Walcott, The Gulf

Simon J. Ortiz, Bend in the River

Jorie Graham, What the End Is For

Gary Soto, History

Silvia Curbelo, Balsero Singing

Dionisio Martinez, History as a Second Language

9. Attitudes, Values, Judgments

William Shakespeare, Sonnet 76 (Why is my verse so barren of new pride?)

Robert Lowell, Epilogue

In Brief: Attitudes, Values, Judgments

Reading Other Poems

John Milton, Lycidas

Ben Jonson, Still to Be Neat

Richard Lovelace, To Lucasta, Going to the Wars

Phillis Wheatley, On Being Brought from Africa to America

Elizabeth Barrett Browning, How Do I Love Thee?

Walt Whitman, When I Heard the Learn'd Astronomer

William Butler Yeats, Meru

Robert Frost, The Gift Outright

Allen Ginsberg, Sunflower Sutra

Louise Glück, Mock Orange

Rita Dove, Parsley

Heidy Steidlmayer, Knife-Sharpener’s Song

New 10. Poets on Poetry

Poetry as Imagination

Art’s Fiction, Truth’s Claims

Poetry as Song

Poetry as Words

Poetry as an Evolving Structure

Poetry as a Destructive Force

The Idea of Lyric

Why Poetry at All?

Emily Dickinson, This is my letter to the World

Poetry Over Time

The Poet’s Audience

Poetry and Style

PART II. WRITING ABOUT POETRY

11. Writing about Poems

Basic Principles

A Brief Example

Robert Herrick, Divination by a Daffodil

A Longer Example:

William Wordsworth, I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud

Getting it Down on Paper

Begin with a Question

Present Your Case

Draw Your Conclusions

Keeping Your Readers in Mind

A Note on Writing about Unrhymed Poems

Organizing Your Paper

A Note on Well-Ordered Paragraphs

Checking Your Work

12. Studying Groups of Poems

Walt Whitman: Poems on Lincoln

Walt Whitman, Hush'd Be the Camps To-Day

Walt Whitman, O Captain! My Captain!

Walt Whitman, When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd

Walt Whitman, This dust was once a man

Emily Dickinson: Poems on Time

Emily Dickinson, I like to see it lap the Miles—

Emily Dickinson, Because I could not stop for Death—

Emily Dickinson, The Heart asks Pleasure—first—

Emily Dickinson, I felt a Cleaving in my Mind

Emily Dickinson, The first Day's Night had come—

Emily Dickinson, After great pain, a formal feeling comes

Emily Dickinson, There's a certain Slant of light

Emily Dickinson, Pain-expands the Time

Writing Your Paper

PART III. ANTHOLOGY

Sherman Alexie, Reservation Love Song

Paula Gunn Allen, Zen Americana

New Julia Alvarez, from 33

A. R. Ammons, The City Limits

A. R. Ammons, Easter Morning

Anonymous, Sir Patrick Spens

Anonymous, Western Wind

Matthew Arnold, Shakespeare

Matthew Arnold, To Marguerite

John Ashbery, Paradoxes and Oxymorons

John Ashbery, Street Musicians

New Margaret Atwood, Habitation

Margaret Atwood, This is a Photograph of Me

Margaret Atwood, Up

W. H. Auden, As I Walked Out One Evening

W.H. Auden, Musée des Beaux Arts

John Berryman, from Dream Songs

4 (Filling her compact & delicious body)

45 (He stared at ruin. Ruin stared straight back)

384 (The marker slants, flowerless, day's almost done)

New Frank Bidart, An American in Hollywood

New Frank Bidart, If See No End In Is

Frank Bidart, To My Father

Elizabeth Bishop, At the Fishhouses

Elizabeth Bishop, Poem

Elizabeth Bishop, Sestina

William Blake, Ah! Sun-flower

William Blake, The Garden of Love

William Blake, The Lamb

New William Blake, The Mental Traveller

William Blake, The Tyger

Richard Blanco, Letters for Mamá

Michael Blumenthal, A Marriage

New Michael Blumenthal, Early Childhood Education

Anne Bradstreet, Before the Birth of One of Her Children

Lucy Brock-Broido, Carrowmore

Lucy Brock-Broido, Domestic Mysticism

New Lucy Brock-Broido, Self-Deliverance by Lion

Emily Bronte, No Coward Soul Is Mine

Emily Bronte, Remembrance

Gwendolyn Brooks, The Bean Eaters

New Gwendolyn Brooks, Beverly Hills, Chicago

Elizabeth Barrett Browning, A Musical Instrument

Robert Browning, Childe Roland to the Dark Tower Came

Robert Burns, O, Wert Thou in the Cauld Blast

Robert Burns, A Red, Red Rose

George Gordon, Lord Byron, When We Two Parted

Lorna Dee Cervantes, Freeway 280

Marilyn Chin, Autumn Leaves

New Victoria Chang, $4.99 All You Can Eat Sunday Brunch

John Clare, Badger

John Clare, First Love

John Clare, I Am

New Lucille Clifton, the lost baby poem

New Henry Cole, Car Wash

Henri Cole, 40 Days and 40 Nights

Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Dejection: An Ode

Samuel Taylor Coleridge, The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

New Eduardo C. Corral, Monologue of a Vulture’s Shadow

William Cowper, The Castaway

William Cowper, Epitaph on a Hare

Hart Crane, The Broken Tower

Hart Crane, To Brooklyn Bridge

New Robert Creeley, When I think

Countee Cullen, Incident

E.E. Cummings, may I feel he said he

New E.E. Cummings, next to of course god america i

Emily Dickinson, The Brain—is wider than the Sky—

Emily Dickinson, I like a look of Agony

Emily Dickinson, Much Madness is divinest Sense—

Emily Dickinson, Safe in their Alabaster Chambers (1859)

Emily Dickinson, Safe in their Alabaster Chambers (1861)

Emily Dickinson, The Soul selects her own Society—

Emily Dickinson, There's a certain Slant of light

Emily Dickinson, Wild Nights—Wild Nights!

New John Donne, Breake of day

John Donne, Death, be not proud

John Donne, The Sun Rising

New Timothy Donnelly, Reading of Medieval Life, I Wonder Who I Am

Rita Dove, Adolescence—II

Rita Dove, Dusting

Paul Laurence Dunbar, Harriet Beecher Stowe

Paul Laurence Dunbar, Robert Gould Shaw

Paul Laurence Dunbar, We Wear the Mask

New Roberto Durán, Protest

T. S. Eliot, Preludes

Thomas Sayers Ellis, View of the Library of Congress from Paul Laurence Dunbar High School

Ralph Waldo Emerson, Concord Hymn

Louise Erdrich, The Strange People

New Rhina Espaillat, Translation

New Gustavo Pérez Firmat, Turning the Times Tables

New Mark Ford, The Long Man

Robert Frost, Birches

Robert Frost, Design

Allen Ginsberg, America

Louise Glück, All Hallows

Louise Glück, The Balcony

New Louise Glück, Midsummer

New Albert Goldbarth, The Novel That Asks to Erase Itself

New Albert Goldbarth, Unforeseeables

Jorie Graham, Of Forced Sightes and Trusty Ferefulness

Jorie Graham, Soul Says

New Jorie Graham, The Strangers

Thomas Gray, Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard

Thom Gunn, The Man with Night Sweats

Thom Gunn, My Sad Captains

H.D., Helen

Thomas Hardy, Afterwards

Michael S. Harper, Nightmare Begins Responsibility

Michael S. Harper, We Assume: On the Death of Our Son, Reuben Masai Harper

Robert Hayden, Frederick Douglass

Robert Hayden, Mourning Poem for the Queen of Sunday

New Terrance Hayes, WOOFER (When I Consider the African-American)

New Terrance Hayes, A Small Novel

Seamus Heaney, Bogland

Seamus Heaney, Punishment

George Herbert, The Collar

George Herbert, Redemption

Robert Herrick, Corinna's Going A-Maying

Gerard Manley Hopkins, God's Grandeur

Gerard Manley Hopkins, No worst, there is none. Pitched past pitch of grief

New John Hollander, By Nature

A.E. Housman, Loveliest of Trees, the Cherry Now

A.E. Housman, With Rue My Heart Is Laden

New Langston Hughes, Dream Variation

Langston Hughes, Harlem

Langston Hughes, I, Too

Langston Hughes, The Weary Blues

Ben Jonson, Come, My Celia

New Laura Kasischke, Miss Consolation for Emotional Damages

John Keats, In drear nighted December

John Keats, La Belle Dame Sans Merci

John Keats, On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again

John Keats, This Living Hand

New Jane Kenyon, Back

New Jane Kenyon, Otherwise

Jane Kenyon, Surprise

Etheridge Knight, A Poem for Myself (Or Blues for a Mississippi Black Boy)

Kenneth Koch, Variations on a Theme by William Carlos Williams

Yusef Komunyakaa, Boat People

Yusef Komunyakaa, My Father's Loveletters

New Yusef Komunyakaa, The Towers

Stanley Kunitz, The Portrait

Philip Larkin, High Windows

Philip Larkin, Reasons for Attendance

Philip Larkin, This Be the Verse

D.H. Lawrence, The English Are So Nice!

New Inada Lawson, XI. Japs

New Li-Young Lee, Mother Deluxe

Denise Levertov, The Ache of Marriage

Harold Littlebird, White-Washing the Walls

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Aftermath

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, The Jewish Cemetery at Newport

Audre Lorde, Hanging Fire

Robert Lowell, Sailing Home from Rapallo

Archibald MacLeish, Ars Poetica

New Victor Martínez, The Ledger

New Andrew Marvell, The Definition of Love

Andrew Marvell, The Mower’s Song

Andrew Marvell, The Mower to the Glowworms

Andrew Marvell, To His Coy Mistress

New Shara McCallum, The Incident

Herman Melville, The Berg

Herman Melville, Monody

New James Merrill, The Christmas Tree

W.S. Merwin, For a Coming Extinction

W.S. Merwin, For the Anniversary of My Death

John Milton, L'Allegro

John Milton, Methought I Saw My Late Espousèd Saint

John Milton, On Shakespeare

New Marianne Moore, A Grave

New Marianne Moore, England

Marianne Moore, Poetry

Marianne Moore, The Steeple-Jack

Pat Mora, La Migra

New Pat Mora, Rituals

New Thylias Moss, One for All Newborns

New Harryette Mullen, Omnivore

Frank O'Hara, Ave Maria

Frank O'Hara, Why I Am Not a Painter

Wilfred Owen, Anthem for Doomed Youth

Wilfred Owen, Disabled

New Grace Paley, from Detour

New Carl Phillips, Blue

Carl Phillips, The Kill

Carl Phillips, Passing

Sylvia Plath, Edge

Sylvia Plath, Lady Lazarus

Sylvia Plath, Morning Song

Edgar Allan Poe, Annabel Lee

Alexander Pope, from An Essay on Man (Epistle 1)

Ezra Pound, In a Station of the Metro

New D.A. Powell, [autumn set us heavily to task: unrooted the dahlias]

New D.A. Powell, [cherry elixir: the first medication. so mary poppins]

Sir Walter Ralegh, The Lie

New Srikanth Reddy, Fourth Circle

Adrienne Rich, Diving into the Wreck

New Adrienne Rich, I Am in Danger—Sir—

Adrienne Rich, The Middle-Aged

Alberto Ríos, Teodoro Luna's Two Kisses

Edwin Arlington Robinson, Richard Cory

Theodore Roethke, Elegy for Jane

Theodore Roethke, The Waking

New Aleida Rodríquez, Lexicon of Exile

New Noelle Brynn Saito, Turkey People

William Shakespeare, Fear No More the Heat o' the Sun

William Shakespeare, Full Fathom Five

William Shakespeare, Sonnet 18 (Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?)

William Shakespeare, Sonnet 116 (Let me not to the marriage of true minds)

Percy Bysshe Shelley, Ode to the West Wind

Percy Bysshe Shelley, Ozymandias

Sir Philip Sidney, from Astrophel and Stella

1 (Loving in Truth)

31 (With how sad steps)

Charles Simic, Charon's Cosmology

Charles Simic, Fork

New Charles Simic, A Suitcase Strapped with a Rope

Christopher Smart, From Jubilate Agno

Christopher Smart, On a Bed of Guernsey Lilies

Dave Smith, On a Field Trip at Fredericksburg

New Ron Smith, The Teachers Pass the Popcorn

Stevie Smith, Not Waving But Drowning

New Tracy K. Smith, El Mar

New Tracy K. Smith, Credulity

Gary Snyder, Axe Handles

Gary Snyder, How Poetry Comes to Me

New Edmund Spenser, A Hymne in Honour of Love

Edmund Spenser, Sonnet 75 (One day I wrote her name upon the strand)

Wallace Stevens, The Idea of Order at Key West

Wallace Stevens, The Planet on the Table

Wallace Stevens, The Snow Man

Wallace Stevens, Sunday Morning

Wallace Stevens, Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackbird

Mark Strand, Keeping Things Whole

New Adrienne Su, The English Canon

New May Swenson, Untitled

New May Swenson, I Look at My Hand

New May Swenson, How Everything Happens

Alfred, Lord Tennyson, from In Memoriam A.H.H.

7 (Dark house)

99 (Risest thou thus)

106 (Ring out, wild bells)

12 (Sad Hesper o'er the buried sun)

Alfred, Lord Tennyson, Tears, Idle Tears

Alfred, Lord Tennyson, Ulysses

Dylan Thomas, Fern Hill

Dylan Thomas, In My Craft or Sullen Art

New Natasha Trethewey, What is Evidence

Henry Vaughan, They Are All Gone into the World of Light!

Derek Walcott, Blues

Derek Walcott, God Rest Ye Merry, Gentlemen

New Derek Walcott, Perhaps it exists….

Rosanna Warren, In Creve Coeur, Missouri

New Joshua Weiner, The Yonder Tree

New James Welch, Getting Things Straight

James Welch, Harlem, Montana: Just Off the Reservation

New Phillis Wheatley, To S.M. a young African Painter, on seeing his Works

Walt Whitman, A Hand-Mirror

Walt Whitman, from Song of Myself

1. (I celebrate myself)

6 (A child said, What is the grass?)

52 (The spotted hawk)

Walt Whitman, Vigil Strange I Kept on the Field One Night

Richard Wilbur, Cottage Street, 1953

Richard Wilbur, The Writer

William Carlos Williams, Landscape with the Fall of Icarus

William Carlos Williams, The Raper from Passenack

William Carlos Williams, Spring and All

William Carlos Williams, This Is Just to Say

William Wordsworth, My Heart Leaps Up

William Wordsworth, Ode: Intimations of Immortality

William Wordsworth, The Solitary Reaper

James Wright, A Blessing

James Wright, Small Frogs Killed on the Highway

Sir Thomas Wyatt, Forget Not Yet

New John Yau, Autobiography in Red and Yello

William Butler Yeats, Among School Children

New William Butler Yeats, A Dialogue Between Self and Soul

William Butler Yeats, Down by the Salley Gardens

William Butler Yeats, The Lake Isle of Innisfree

William Butler Yeats, Leda and the Swan

William Butler Yeats, Sailing to Byzantium

William Butler Yeats, The Second Coming

Appendices

On Prosody

On Grammar

On Speech Acts

On Rhetorical Devices

On Lyric Subgenres

Index of Authors, Titles, and First Lines

Index of Terms [Endpapers]

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  • Posted July 10, 2009

    "Poems. Poets. Poetry"

    Helen Vendler's "Poems. Poets. Poetry" is by far the most illuminating and exciting analysis of poetry I have ever read.
    For many of my friends, form in poetry simply means stanzas whose lines, rhymed or unrhymed, are of fixed number and length. Her analysis is particularly valuable in that it also examines patterns less emphasized by other anthologies (if at all) such as the grammatical, syntactic, logical...patterns poets use to organize their thought and emotion into poems.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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