Poe's Children: The New Horror: An Anthology

Overview

A Washington Post Best Book of the Year

Peter Straub—bestselling author and 8-time Bram Stoker Award winner—has gathered here 24 ...

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Poe's Children: The New Horror: An Anthology

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Overview

A Washington Post Best Book of the Year

Peter Straub—bestselling author and 8-time Bram Stoker Award winner—has gathered here 24 bone-chilling, nail-biting, frightfully imaginative stories that represent the best of contemporary horror writing.

Dan Chaon “The Bees”
Elizabeth Hand “Cleopatra Brimstone”
Steve Rasnic Tem and Melanie Tem “The Man on the Ceiling”
M. John Harrison “The Great God Plan”
Ramsey Campbell “The Voice of the Beach”
Brian Evenson “Body”
Kelly Link “Louise’s Ghost”
Jonathan Carroll “The Sadness of Detail”
M. Rickert “Leda”
Thomas Tessier “In Praise of Folly”
David J. Schow “Plot Twist”
Glen Hirshberg “The Two Sams”
Thomas Ligotti “Notes on the Writing of Horror: A Story”
Benjamin Percy “Unearthed”
Bradford Morrow "Gardener of Heart”
Peter Straub “Little Red’s Tango”
Stephen King “The Ballad of a Flexible Bullet”
Joe Hill “20th Century Ghost”
Ellen Klages “The Green Glass Sea”
Tia V. Travis “The Kiss”
Graham Joyce “Black Dust”
Neil Gaiman “October in the Chair”
John Crowley “Missolonghi 1824”
Rosalind Palermo Stevenson “Insect Dreams”

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“Revelatory. . . . A remarkably consistent, frequently unsettling book.” —The Washington Post

“Straub is uniquely qualified to hold forth on what makes a good horror story. . . . [He] collects the best scary short stories out there.” —Time

Bill Sheehan
…an impressive, highly personal assortment of perspectives and techniques. The result is a remarkably consistent, frequently unsettling book that does as much to blur the artificial boundary between genre fiction and "literature" as any anthology in living memory…transcends genre labels and deserves to be recognized for what it is: first-rate fiction.
—The Washington Post
Publishers Weekly

Edited by legendary horror writer Straub, whose works tend to vary from the stereotypical horror stories of recent decades, this collection of 12 unusual and terrifying tales strays from the formulaic bloodbaths that stock the shelves of bookstores everywhere. The collection features stories by such established writers as Neil Gaiman, Jonathan Carroll, Straub and Stephen King, whose early story "The Ballad of the Flexible Bullet" is read by John Lee with such earnestness and delight that it makes fans remember why they fell in love with King's prose to begin with. It also offers plenty of fresh voices in the genre. The cast of narrators is equally expansive, with a new voice tackling each new tale and always managing to get it right. A true standout is Mark Bramhall's reading of Dan Chaon's story "The Bees." A Doubleday hardcover (Reviews, Sept. 8). (Oct.)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Library Journal

With an introduction by the much honored Straub (Ghost Story ), this collection can be dubbed New Wave horror, considering that most of its 24 stories were published fairly recently and it includes contributions by celebrity horror writers. The tales mostly eschew buckets of blood, instead employing mood and suggestion in the manner of Edgar Allan Poe. "Little Red's Tango," Straub's lengthy quasigospel of a record-collecting obsessive, complete with beatitudes and a seductive demon, ably represents the editor's definition of New Wave horror. All the stories honor Poe, like the moody, contagious delusions of Stephen King's "The Ballad of the Flexible Bullet." The genre can be literary, as exemplified by Tia V. Travis's vengeful "The Kiss," Thomas Tessier's surprising "In Praise of Folly," and, probably the most demonstrably Poe-like, Ramsey Campbell's "The Voice of the Beach," featuring a neurasthenic narrator, suffocating suggestibility, and nearly palpable imagery. Brian Evenson's creepy "Body" and Dan Chaon's touching "The Bees" culminate in the horror of bad deeds catching up. The other stories included are without exception excellent. Recommended for all libraries.-Jonathan Pearce, California State Univ.-Stanislaus, Stockton

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780307386403
  • Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 10/6/2009
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 608
  • Sales rank: 781,460
  • Product dimensions: 5.20 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 1.06 (d)

Meet the Author

Peter Straub
PETER STRAUB is the author of seventeen novels, including Ghost Story and Koko, as well as two collaborations with Stephen King. Winner of eight Bram Stoker Awards, two International Horror Guild Awards, two World Fantasy Awards, and both a Lifetime Achievement Award and election as a Grand Master from the Horror Writers Association, he lives in New York City.

www.peterstraub.net

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    1. Hometown:
      New York City
    1. Date of Birth:
      March 2, 1943
    2. Place of Birth:
      Milwaukee, Wisconsin
    1. Education:
      B.A. in English, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1965; M.A., Columbia University, 1966
    2. Website:

Read an Excerpt

The Bees
 
Dan Chaon
 
Gene's son Frankie wakes up screaming. It has become frequent, two or three times a week, at random times: midnight--
 
3 a.m.--five in the morning. Here is a high, empty wail that severs Gene from his unconsciousness like sharp teeth. It is the worst sound that Gene can imagine, the sound of a young child dying violently--falling from a building, or caught in some machinery that is tearing an arm off, or being mauled by a predatory animal. No matter how many times he hears it he jolts up with such images playing in his mind, and he always runs, thumping into the child's bedroom to find Frankie sitting up in bed, his eyes closed, his mouth open in an oval like a Christmas caroler. Frankie appears to be in a kind of peaceful trance, and if someone took a picture of him he would look like he was waiting to receive a spoonful of ice cream, rather than emitting that horrific sound.
 
"Frankie!" Gene will shout, and claps his hands hard in the child's face. The clapping works well. At this, the scream always stops abruptly, and Frankie opens his eyes, blinking at Gene with vague awareness before settling back down into his pillow, nuzzling a little before growing still. He is sound asleep, he is always sound asleep, though even after months Gene can't help leaning down and pressing his ear to the child's chest, to make sure he's still breathing, his heart is still going. It always is.
 
There is no explanation that they can find. In the morning, the child doesn't remember anything, and on the few occasions that they have managed to wake him in the midst of one of his screaming attacks, he is merely sleepy and irritable. Once, Gene's wife, Karen, shook him and shook him, until finally he opened his eyes, groggily. "Honey?" she said. "Honey? Did you have a bad dream?" But Frankie only moaned a little. "No," he said, puzzled and unhappy at being awakened, but nothing more.
 
They can find no pattern to it. It can happen any day of the week, any time of the night. It doesn't seem to be associated with diet, or with his activities during the day, and it doesn't stem, as far as they can tell, from any sort of psychological unease. During the day, he seems perfectly normal and happy.
 
They have taken him several times to the pediatrician, but the doctor seems to have little of use to say. There is nothing wrong with the child physically, Dr. Banerjee says. She advises that such things were not uncommon for children of Frankie's age group--he is five--and that more often than not, the disturbance simply passes away.
 
"He hasn't experienced any kind of emotional trauma, has he?" the doctor says. "Nothing out of the ordinary at home?"
 
"No, no," they both murmur, together. They shake their heads, and Dr. Banerjee shrugs. "Parents," she says. "It's probably nothing to worry about." She gives them a brief smile. "As difficult as it is, I'd say that you may just have to weather this out."
 
But the doctor has never heard those screams. In the mornings after the "nightmares," as Karen calls them, Gene feels unnerved, edgy. He works as a driver for the United Parcel Service, and as he moves through the day after a screaming attack, there is a barely perceptible hum at the edge of his hearing, an intent, deliberate static sliding along behind him as he wanders through streets and streets in his van. He stops along the side of the road and listens. The shadows of summer leaves tremble murmurously against the windshield, and cars are accelerating on a nearby road. In the treetops, a cicada makes its trembly, pressure-cooker hiss.
 
Something bad has been looking for him for a long time, he thinks, and now, at last, it is growing near.
 
When he comes home at night everything is normal. They live in an old house in the suburbs of Cleveland, and sometimes after dinner they work together in the small patch of garden out in back of the house--tomatoes, zucchini, string beans, cucumbers--while Frankie plays with Legos in the dirt. Or they take walks around the neighborhood, Frankie riding his bike in front of them, his training wheels recently removed. They gather on the couch and watch cartoons together, or play board games, or draw pictures with crayons. After Frankie is asleep, Karen will sit at the kitchen table and study--she is in nursing school--and Gene will sit outside on the porch, flipping through a newsmagazine or a novel, smoking the cigarettes that he has promised Karen he will give up when he turns thirty-five. He is thirty-four now, and Karen is twenty-seven, and he is aware, more and more frequently, that this is not the life that he deserves. He has been incredibly lucky, he thinks. Blessed, as Gene's favorite cashier at the supermarket always says. "Have a blessed day," she says, when Gene pays the money and she hands him his receipt, and he feels as if she has sprinkled him with her ordinary, gentle beatitude. It reminds him of long ago, when an old nurse had held his hand in the hospital and said that she was praying for him.
 
Sitting out in his lawn chair, drawing smoke out of his cigarette, he thinks about that nurse, even though he doesn't want to. He thinks of the way she'd leaned over him and brushed his hair as he stared at her, imprisoned in a full body cast, sweating his way through withdrawal and D.T.'s.
 
He had been a different person, back then. A drunk, a monster. At nineteen, he'd married the girl he'd gotten pregnant, and then had set about slowly, steadily, ruining all their lives. When he'd abandoned them, his wife and son, back in Nebraska, he had been twenty-four, a danger to himself and others. He'd done them a favor by leaving, he thought, though he still felt guilty when he thought about it. Years later, when he was sober, he'd even tried to contact them. He wanted to own up to his behavior, to pay the back child-support, to apologize. But they were nowhere to be found. Mandy was no longer living in the small Nebraska town where they'd met and married, and there was no forwarding address. Her parents were dead. No one seemed to know where she'd gone.
 
Karen didn't know the full story. She had been, to his relief, uncurious about his previous life, though she knew he had some drinking days, some bad times. She knew that he'd been married before, too, though she didn't know the extent of it, didn't know that he had another son, for example, didn't know that he had left them one night, without even packing a bag, just driving off in the car, a flask tucked between his legs, driving east as far as he could go. She didn't know about the car crash, the wreck he should have died in. She didn't know what a bad person he'd been.
 
She was a nice lady, Karen. Maybe a little sheltered. And truth to tell, he was ashamed--and even scared--to imagine how she would react to the truth about his past. He didn't know if she would have ever really trusted him if she'd known the full story, and the longer they knew one another the less inclined he was to reveal it. He'd escaped his old self, he thought, and when Karen got pregnant, shortly before they were married, he told himself that now he had a chance to do things over, to do it better. They had purchased the house together, he and Karen, and now Frankie will be in kindergarten in the fall. He has come full circle, has come exactly to the point when his former life with Mandy and his son, DJ, had completely fallen apart. He looks up as Karen comes to the back door and speaks to him through the screen. "I think it's time for bed, sweetheart," she says softly, and he shudders off these thoughts, these memories. He smiles.
 
He's been in a strange frame of mind lately. The months of regular awakenings have been getting to him, and he has a hard time getting back to sleep after an episode with Frankie. When Karen wakes him in the morning, he often feels muffled, sluggish--as if he's hung over. He doesn't hear the alarm clock. When he stumbles out of bed, he finds he has a hard time keeping his moodiness in check. He can feel his temper coiling up inside him.
 
He isn't that type of person anymore, and hasn't been for a long while. Still, he can't help but worry. They say that there is a second stretch of craving, which sets in after several years of smooth sailing; five or seven years will pass, and then it will come back without warning. He has been thinking of going to A.A. meetings again, though he hasn't in some time--not since he met Karen.
 
It's not as if he gets trembly every time he passes a liquor store, or even as if he has a problem when he goes out with buddies and spends the evening drinking soda and non-alcoholic beer. No. The trouble comes at night, when he's asleep.
 
He has begun to dream of his first son. DJ. Perhaps it is related to his worries about Frankie, but for several nights in a row the image of DJ--aged about five--has appeared to him. In the dream, Gene is drunk, and playing hide and seek with DJ in the yard behind the Cleveland house where he is now living. There is the thick weeping willow out there, and Gene watches the child appear from behind it and run across the grass, happily, unafraid, the way Frankie would. DJ turns to look over his shoulder and laughs, and Gene stumbles after him, at least a six-pack's worth of good mood, a goofy, drunken dad. It's so real that when he wakes, he still feels intoxicated. It takes him a few minutes to shake it.
 
One morning after a particularly vivid version of this dream, Frankie wakes and complains of a funny feeling--"right here"--he says, and points to his forehead. It isn't a headache, he says. "It's like bees!" he says. "Buzzing bees!" He rubs his hand against his brow. "Inside my head." He considers for a moment. "You know how the bees bump against the window when they get in the house and want to get out?" This description pleases him, and he taps his forehead lightly with his fingers, humming, "zzzzzzz," to demonstrate.
 
"Does it hurt?" Karen says.
 
"No," Frankie says. "It tickles."
 
Karen gives Gene a concerned look. She makes Frankie lie down on the couch, and tells him to close his eyes for a while. After a few minutes, he raises up, smiling, and says that the feeling has gone.
 
"Honey, are you sure?" Karen says. She pushes her hair back and slides her palm across his forehead. "He's not hot," she says, and Frankie sits up impatiently, suddenly more interested in finding a Matchbox car he dropped under a chair.
 
Karen gets out one of her nursing books, and Gene watches her face tighten with concern as she flips slowly through the pages. She is looking at Chapter 3: Neurological System, and Gene observes as she pauses here and there, skimming down a list of symptoms. "We should probably take him back to Dr. Banerjee again," she says. Gene nods, recalling what the doctor said about "emotional trauma."
 
"Are you scared of bees?" he asks Frankie. "Is that something that's bothering you?"
 
"No," Frankie says. "Not really."
 
When Frankie was three, a bee stung him above his left eyebrow. They had been out hiking together, and they hadn't yet learned that Frankie was "moderately allergic" to bee stings. Within minutes of the sting, Frankie's face had begun to distort, to puff up, his eye welling shut. He looked deformed. Gene didn't know if he'd ever been more frightened in his entire life, running down the trail with Frankie's head pressed against his heart, trying to get to the car and drive him to the doctor, terrified that the child was dying. Frankie himself was calm.
 
Gene clears his throat. He knows the feeling that Frankie is talking about--he has felt it himself, that odd, feathery vibration inside his head. And in fact he feels it again, now. He presses the pads of his fingertips against his brow. Emotional trauma, his mind murmurs, but he is thinking of DJ, not Frankie.
 
"What are you scared of?" Gene asks Frankie, after a moment. "Anything?"
 
"You know what the scariest thing is?" Frankie says, and widens his eyes, miming a frightened look. "There's a lady with no head, and she went walking through the woods, looking for it. 'Give_._._._me_._._._back_._._._my_._._._head._._._.'"
 
"Where on earth did you hear a story like that!" Karen says.
 
"Daddy told me," Frankie says. "When we were camping."
 
Gene blushes, even before Karen gives him a sharp look. "Oh, great," she says. "Wonderful."
 
He doesn't meet her eyes. "We were just telling ghost stories," he says, softly. "I thought he would think the story was funny."
 
"My God, Gene," she says. "With him having nightmares like this? What were you thinking?"
 
It's a bad flashback, the kind of thing he's usually able to avoid. He thinks abruptly of Mandy, his former wife. He sees in Karen's face that look Mandy would give him when he screwed up. "What are you, some kind of idiot?" Mandy used to say. "Are you crazy?" Back then, Gene couldn't do anything right, it seemed, and when Mandy yelled at him it made his stomach clench with shame and inarticulate rage. I was trying, he would think, I was trying, damn it, and it was as if no matter what he did, it wouldn't turn out right. That feeling would sit heavily in his chest, and eventually, when things got worse, he hit her once. "Why do you want me to feel like shit," he had said through clenched teeth. "I'm not an asshole," he said, and when she rolled her eyes at him he slapped her hard enough to knock her out of her chair.
 
That was the time he'd taken DJ to the carnival. It was a Saturday, and he'd been drinking a little so Mandy didn't like it, but after all--he thought--DJ was his son too; he had a right to spend some time with his own son. Mandy wasn't his boss even if she might think she was. She liked to make him hate himself.
 
What she was mad about was that he'd taken DJ on the _Velocerator. It was a mistake, he'd realized afterward. But DJ himself had begged to go on.
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Table of Contents

Introduction • Peter Straub
 
The Bees • Dan Chaon
 
Cleopatra Brimstone • Elizabeth Hand
 
The Man on the Ceiling • Steve Rasnic Tem and Melanie Tem

The Great God Pan • M. John Harrison
 
The Voice of the Beach • Ramsey Campbell
 
Body • Brian Evenson
 
Louise's Ghost • Kelly Link
 
The Sadness of Detail • Jonathan Carroll
 
Leda • M. Rickert
 
In Praise of Folly • Thomas Tessier
 
Plot Twist • David J. Schow
 
The Two Sams • Glen Hirshberg
 
Notes on the Writing of Horror: A Story • Thomas Ligotti
 
Unearthed • Benjamin Percy
 
Gardener of Heart • Bradford Morrow
 
Little Red's Tango • Peter Straub
 
The Ballad of the Flexible Bullet • Stephen King
 
20th Century Ghost • Joe Hill
 
The Green Glass Sea • Ellen Klages
 
The Kiss • Tia V. Travis
 
Black Dust • Graham Joyce
 
October in the Chair • Neil Gaiman
 
Missolonghi 1824 • John Crowley
 
Insect Dreams • Rosalind Palermo Stevenson
 
Credits
About the Authors
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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 7, 2013

    As a fan of the horror genre, I cannot tell you how much I loved

    As a fan of the horror genre, I cannot tell you how much I loved this book! The stories in this anthology are simply brilliant and genuinely scary (or at least insanely creepy). My favorites were "The Ballad of the Flexible Bullet", where a writer goes insane and believes there are elves inside his typewriter, and "Cleopatra Brimstone", a bizarre story about a woman who turns into a butterfly (and not in a good way). It's a great selection of authors, so if you're into horror, it's definitely a must have!

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    Posted November 22, 2010

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