Poet and Peasant and Through Peasant Eyes: A Literary-Cultural Approach to the Parables in Luke

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Overview

This volume is a combined edition of Poet and Peasant and Through Peasant Eyes, Kenneth Bailey's intensive studies of the parables in the gospel of Luke. Bailey begins by surveying the development of allegorical, historical-eschatological, aesthetic, and existential methods of interpretation. Though figures like Julicher, Jeremias, Dodd, Jones, and Via have made important advances, Bailey sees the need to go beyond them by combining an examination of the poetic structures of the parables with a better understanding of the Oriental culture that informs the text. Bailey's work within Middle Eastern peasant culture over the last twenty years has helped him in his attempt to determine the cultural assumptions that the teller of the parables must have made about his audience. The same values which underlay the impact of the parables in Christ's time, Bailey suggests, can be discovered today in isolated peasant communities in Egypt, Lebanon, Syria, and Iraq. Because time has made almost no impact in these cultural pockets, it is possible to discern, for example, what it meant 2,000 years ago for a friend to come calling at midnight, or for a son to ask for his inheritance prior to his father's death. In addition to illuminating the cultural framework of the parables, Bailey offers an analysis of their literary structure, treating the parabolic section as a whole as well as its individual components. Through its combination of literary and cultural analyses, Bailey's study makes a number of profound advances in parabolic interpretation.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780802819475
  • Publisher: Eerdmans, William B. Publishing Company
  • Publication date: 5/28/1983
  • Edition description: Combined Edition
  • Pages: 187
  • Sales rank: 695,578
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 8.97 (h) x 0.94 (d)

Meet the Author

Author and Lecturer in Middle Eastern New Testament Studies in New Wilmington, Pennsylvania. Canon Theologian of the Episcopal Diocese of Pittsburgh.

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Table of Contents

  1. Part One: INTRODUCTION

  2. THE PROBLEM AND THE TASK
  3. The Unfinished Work
    Major Trends in Recent Parabolic Interpretation

    (1)The Historical-Eschatological: Dodd and Jeremias
    (2)Jones: Parables as Art
    (3)Linnemann and Via: The Existential Perspective
    Reaction and Assessment: A Remaining Task

  4. METHODOLOGY (1): THE CULTURAL PROBLEM
  5. The Basic Problem: Cultural Foreignness
    A Review of Types of Solutions to the Cultural Problem
    Oriental Exegesis: A Proposal

    A definition of "Oriental exegesis"
    Ancient literature: its importance and the exegete's problem in assessing it
    The contemporary Middle Eastern peasant and his oral tradition as a tool for recovering the culture of the parables
    The archaic nature of his life style Past attempts at gleaning insights from Middle Eastern peasantry
    The unfinished task: its method and its controls
    The significance of the Oriental versions for exegesis
    Discerning the Theological Cluster
    Summary and Conclusions

  6. METHODOLOGY (2): FOUR TYPES OF LITERARY STRUCTURES IN THE NEW TESTAMENT AND THEIR SIGNIFICANCE FOR THE INTERPRETATION OF PARABLES
  7. A Review of Past Scholarship on the Question of Literary Structures
    A Definition of Terms
    Four Types of Literary Structures in the New Testament

    Type A—Inverted Prose
    Type B—Seven Poetical Forms
    Type C—Poetry Encased in Prose
    Type D—The Parabolic Ballad
    Summary and Conclusions

    Part Two: AN ANALYSIS OF FOUR PARABLES AND TWO POEMS IN THE TRAVEL NARRATIVE OF LUKE

  8. THE LITERARY OUTLINE OF THE TRAVEL NARRATIVE (JERUSALEM DOCUMENT): Luke 9:51-19:48
  9. EXEGESIS OF LUKE 16:1-13
  10. The Unjust Steward (16:1-8)
    The Poem on Mammon and God (16:9-13)

  11. EXEGESIS OF LUKE 11:5-13
  12. The Friend at Midnight (11:5-8)
    The Parable/Poem on a Father's Gifts (11:9-13)

  13. EXEGESIS OF LUKE 15
  14. The Lost Sheep and the Lost Coin (15:4-10)
    The Father and the Two Lost Sons (15:11-32)

    CONCLUSIONS

    APPENDIX A. A Brief Description of the Oriental Versions Used in This Study
    APPENDIX B. Resource Persons
    SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY
    INDEX OF AUTHORS
    INDEX OF REFERENCES

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