Poetic Madness and the Romantic Imagination

Overview

Using as his starting point the historical notion that poets may be, at least in moments of inspiration, ""out of their senses,"" Frederick Burwick here explores the theoretical implications of inspiration as furor poeticus, particularly as that concept was presented during the latter eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Drawing on social and medical attitudes toward madness and the so-called poetic rapture, Burwick addresses the appeal to poetic madness in critical theory, the thematization of the mad poet...
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Overview

Using as his starting point the historical notion that poets may be, at least in moments of inspiration, ""out of their senses,"" Frederick Burwick here explores the theoretical implications of inspiration as furor poeticus, particularly as that concept was presented during the latter eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Drawing on social and medical attitudes toward madness and the so-called poetic rapture, Burwick addresses the appeal to poetic madness in critical theory, the thematization of the mad poet in literature, and the reception of mad poets.

With a mad king on the throne of England, mad prophets in the marketplace, and mad poets in their midst, many writers of this period, not surprisingly, used their fiction to explore the conditions of madness. In discussing the mad poet as a character in Romantic literature, Burwick examines the reception and representation of the Italian poet Torquato Tasso in Goethe's play and in the poetry and criticism of the Schlegels, Byron, Shelley, Peacock, and Hazlitt. In his commentary on narratives of madness, Burwick discusses Nodier's Jean-François les bas-bleus, Hoffmann's Der Goldne Topf, Shelley's Julian and Maddalo, and Blake's account of the struggle between Los and Urizen. The final section interprets the visual strategies adopted by Hölderlin, Nerval, and Clare in relating their visionary experiences.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780271026220
  • Publisher: Penn State University Press
  • Publication date: 10/7/2004
  • Pages: 316
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.97 (d)

Meet the Author

Frederick Burwick is Professor of English and Comparative Literature at the University of California, Los Angeles. He is the author of, most recently, Illusion and the Drama: Critical Theory of the Enlightenment and Romantic Era (Penn State, 1991) and editor (with Paul Douglass) of The Crisis of Modernism: Bergson and the Vitalist Controversy (1992) and (with Walter Pape) Reflecting Senses: Perception and Appearance in Literature, Culture, and the Arts (1995).

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction: Creativity and Madness 1
1 Genius, Madness, and Inspiration 21
2 Coleridge and De Quincey: Inspiration and Revelation 43
3 The Aesthetics of the "Other Half" 78
4 Irrationality in Goethe's Torquato Tasso 105
5 Paradoxes of Rationality and Representation 144
6 Blake and the Blighted Corn 180
7 Arnim's "Walks with Holderlin" 203
8 Nerval's Chimeras 229
9 Clare's "Child Harold" 254
Bibliography 277
Index 297
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