Poetry of the First World War: An Anthology

Poetry of the First World War: An Anthology

4.0 2
by Tim Kendall
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

The First World War produced an extraordinary flowering of poetic talent. Its poets mark the conflict in ways that are both intensely personal and as enduring as any monument. Their lines have come to express the feelings of a nation about the horrors and consequences of war.

This new anthology provides a definitive record of the achievements of the Great War

Overview

The First World War produced an extraordinary flowering of poetic talent. Its poets mark the conflict in ways that are both intensely personal and as enduring as any monument. Their lines have come to express the feelings of a nation about the horrors and consequences of war.

This new anthology provides a definitive record of the achievements of the Great War poets and offers a fresh assessment of the work on the centenary of the Great War's outbreak. Focusing on the poets themselves, the book is organized by writer, not theme or chronology. It offers generous selections from the celebrated soldier-poets, including Wilfred Owen, Siegfried Sassoon, and Rupert Brooke, whilst also incorporating less well-known writing by civilian and women poets. It also includes two previously unpublished poems by Ivor Gurney.

A general introduction charts the history of the war poets' reception and challenges prevailing myths about the war poets' progress from idealism to bitterness. The work of each poet is prefaced with a biographical account that sets the poems in their historical context.

Although the War has now passed out of living memory, its haunting of our language and culture has not been exorcised. Its poetry survives because it continues to speak to and about us.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
01/01/2016
An excellent sampling of the best war poets of World War I including Rupert Brooke, Wilfred Owen, and Robert Graves. Poetry can be a very visceral form of memoir, offering intimate insight into the mind and experience of the writer that is often not possible in prose.
From the Publisher
"Kendall's judicious selections, and his concise and useful introductions to each of the chosen poets, suggest that his anthology will become a standard work."
—The Times Literary Supplement

"A superb, unbeatable collection."—Bel Mooney, Daily Mail

"The best poetry collection I read...brilliantly edited, with illuminating notes."—Jerard Bretts, The Guardian

"This is a thoroughly well produced anthology of powerful and fascinating poems."—Sheenagh Pugh

"This is much the best selection yet made ... Kendall selects brilliantly."—Peter McDonald, Times Literary Supplement

"As a student-friendly definition of the Great War canon, and as a piece of meticulous scholarship, this one will be hard to beat."—George Simmers, Great War Fiction

"This volume is dedicated to helping us find the best poetry that came out of the 'War To End All Wars."—Sharon Worth,RALPH: The Review of Arts, Literature, Philosophy, and the Humanities

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780199581443
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Publication date:
12/01/2013
Pages:
368
Sales rank:
791,072
Product dimensions:
5.00(w) x 7.80(h) x 1.20(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Tim Kendall has taught at the universities of Oxford, Newcastle, and Bristol before becoming Professor and Head of English at the University of Exeter. His publications for OUP include Modern English War Poetry and The Oxford Handbook of British and Irish War Poetry, and he is writing War Poetry: A Very Short Introduction. He is also co-editor of the forthcoming Complete Literary Works of Ivor Gurney.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Poetry of the First World War: An Anthology 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Interesting sampling of the major English poets and the poems known to most. I thought the quick biography of each poet helpful. I think that poets from the opposing German forces should also have been included. The death and destruction, the fear and the terror of that war was felt by both sides and was/is a glue that binds them and their common shared experience tightly to each other. Whether by happenstance or by choice the compiler here also shows the loss of innocence and unquestioned patriotism of the early years when war was "fun" as it ground down nations and ground up their sons and their daughters.
OWC-reader More than 1 year ago
This book is excellent, with a good selection and helpful notes, but be aware that it contains only British and Irish poetry, so for example the most famous English poem of WWI, the Canadian John McRae's "In Flanders Field", does not appear.