Point of No Return

Point of No Return

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by John P. Marquand
     
 

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Charles Gray has come to a pivotal point in his career: he is competing for the vice presidency of the select private bank for which he works. While waiting for the fateful decision, Gray returns to the small Massachusetts town where he grew up, to try to find out how he has reached this point, and to decide which way to go.  See more details below

Overview

Charles Gray has come to a pivotal point in his career: he is competing for the vice presidency of the select private bank for which he works. While waiting for the fateful decision, Gray returns to the small Massachusetts town where he grew up, to try to find out how he has reached this point, and to decide which way to go.

Editorial Reviews

New York Times Book Review
"Marvelously clever in design and ...a pleasure to read."
Maxwell Geismar
It is marvelously clever in design and execution and it is a pleasure to read, if in some respects it is painful to think about. -- The New York Times
Orville Prescott
Since so much has been written about this excellent book, little may be said about it here. I am an ardent admirer of Mr. Marquand as a brilliant social reporter of the American scene, an unfailingly skillful literary craftsman, a true novelist who does not neglect to tell a good story in his anxiety to express his satiric discontent with American life. -- The Yale Review
Edward Weeks
I admire the writing and have been regaled by its satire of New York bankers.
—Edward Weeks, Atlantic

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780897331746
Publisher:
Chicago Review Press, Incorporate
Publication date:
10/28/1985
Pages:
559
Product dimensions:
5.51(w) x 8.45(h) x 1.29(d)

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Point of No Return 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is not the easiest book to read, but patience is rewarded handsomely. The book concerns Charley, a suburbanite commuter and banker at a white-shoe bank in New York City. Part of the plot is a genial satire that pits Charley against his flashier rival, Roger, for the newly open post of Vice-President. The more significant part of the plot, however, has Charley making a business trip to the town he grew up in and left some years ago. Charley is haunted by visions of his youth, especially the girl he was briefly engaged to and almost married. It was back in the 1920s that Charley got to know the brilliant young sociologist who was then researching on the sly that little town that later furnished the information for his breakthrough best-seller, 'Yankee Persepolis.' Charley has imbibed enough of the determinism of the sociological perspective to wonder if he, in his early 40s, has reached his own 'point of no return'--or, even worse, was his future predetermined at birth? Most of the characters that surround Charley are stick figures (the nagging suburban wife, the children of middling intellect, the roundabout boss), but we follow Charley's changes as he struggles with his crisis. Despite his obvious socioeconomic advantages and his leveraging for more, I found myself rooting for Charley. I really enjoyed this book.