Poisons: From Hemlock to Botox and the Killer Bean Calabar

Overview


Poisons permeate our world. They are in the environment, the workplace, the home. They are in food, our favorite whiskey, medicine, and well water. They have been used to cure diseases as well as incapacitate and kill. They smooth wrinkles, block pain, stimulate and enhance athletic ability. In this entertaining and fact-filled book, science writer Peter Macinnis considers poisons in all their aspects. He recounts stories of the celebrated poisoners in history and literature, from Nero to Thomas Wainewright, and...
See more details below
Paperback
$11.67
BN.com price
(Save 9%)$12.95 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (16) from $2.60   
  • New (7) from $7.24   
  • Used (9) from $2.60   
Poisons: From Hemlock to Botox and the Killer Bean of Calabar

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$10.49
BN.com price
(Save 18%)$12.95 List Price

Overview


Poisons permeate our world. They are in the environment, the workplace, the home. They are in food, our favorite whiskey, medicine, and well water. They have been used to cure diseases as well as incapacitate and kill. They smooth wrinkles, block pain, stimulate and enhance athletic ability. In this entertaining and fact-filled book, science writer Peter Macinnis considers poisons in all their aspects. He recounts stories of the celebrated poisoners in history and literature, from Nero to Thomas Wainewright, and from the death of Socrates to Hamlet and Peter Pan.

From cyanide to strychnine, from Botox to ricin and Sarin gas—have you ever wondered about their sources? Where do they come from? How do you detect something that can kill you in a matter of seconds? Macinnis methodically analyzes the science of these killing agents and their uses in medicine, cosmetics, war, and terrorism. With wit and precision, he weighs these questions and many more: Was Lincoln’s volatility caused by mercury poisoning? Was Jack the Ripper an arsenic eater? Can wallpaper kill? For anyone who has ever wondered and been afraid to ask, here is a rich miscellany for your secret questions about toxins.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Financial Times
“Seasons history with a good pinch of character and storytelling.”
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781611450149
  • Publisher: Arcade Publishing
  • Publication date: 5/15/2011
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 1,405,278
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.20 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author

Peter Macinnis, a science writer, has also been a teacher and museum educator. The author of twenty books for adults and children, including Bittersweet: The Story of Sugar and Poisons: From Hemlock to Botox and the Killer Bean of Calabar, he has appeared on radio and television in his native Australia. He now works for an online encyclopedia and lives in Sydney.
Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Poisons

From Hemlock to Botox and the Killer Bean of Calabar
By Peter Macinnis

Arcade Publishing

Copyright © 2006 Peter Macinnis
All right reserved.

ISBN: 9781559708104


Prologue

Books often have peculiar provenances. I began this one in whimsy, chatting to Emma the Excellent Editor about Mr. Pugh, a character in Dylan Thomas's Under Milk Wood. Poor Mr. Pugh was a schoolteacher, and Thomas gives him a "moustache worn thick and long in memory of Doctor Crippen." Henpecked Pugh sat at the breakfast table, reading his book, Lives of the Great Poisoners, and dreaming of poisoning Mrs. Pugh.

I said in the middle of a conversation about something completely different that I was sure nobody had ever written a book called Lives of the Great Poisoners, and within a few minutes I was arguing to write Mr. Pugh's Breakfast Table Book. Later I saw that most of Mr. Pugh's Great Poisoners were abject failures, because they were found out. The clever ones, as Balzac pointed out, got away with it, eluding both punishment and fame.

Le secret des grandes fortunes sans cause apparente est un crime oublie, parce qu'il a ete proprement fait. (The secret of great fortunes for which you are at a loss to account is a crime that has never been found out, because it was properly executed.)

It mattered little. By then Iwas looking more widely at poisons, where they are found, why they do harm, and how they are used to do good. That led me to the evolution of poisons, medical poisons, the poison battle between toxic bacteria and drugs, and the battle played out in the nineteenth century between the poisoners and those seeking to stop poisoners, if only by demonstrating that any poison could be detected in a corpse, no matter how cleverly the poison was administered, and thus taking away the hope of eluding detection.

You can take almost any starting point and trace a trail of poison. Let me demonstrate. (All the instances mentioned here will be met later in this tale.) George Bernard Shaw was a good socialist who kept company with socialist writers and men of letters like H. G. Wells, Clive Bell, and Leonard Woolf: suppose we take this small and select group of Fabians as the epicenter and see how they were all associated with poisons in different ways.

Shaw met Madeleine Wardle, formerly the famous or infamous Madeleine Smith, who had been cleared of the arsenic murder of her lover by a "Not Proven" verdict. She had then married the Pre-Raphaelite painter George Wardle. Shaw said later that he found her quite pleasant. Shaw's friend Wells exposed the evils of lead poisoning in the potteries of England, where plumbism was rampant, while Leonard Woolf and Clive Bell were married to the Stephen girls, Virginia and Vanessa.

Virginia Woolf and Vanessa Bell had an uncle who was the judge in Florence Maybrick's trial for the murder by poison of her husband. Some people say that James Maybrick may have been Jack the Ripper; another unlikely suspect was the judge's son, the cousin of Virginia and Vanessa, the poet J. K. Stephen. Yet another Ripper suspect was the doctor and convicted poison murderer Neill Cream. Cream was a medical student with Arthur Conan Doyle, himself recently accused of committing a poison murder, almost a century after the death in question.

Florence Maybrick's husband and Madeleine Smith's lover were both reported to be addicted to arsenic, and another Pre-Raphaelite, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, married his model, Elizabeth Siddal, who used arsenic to make her complexion paler. She later poisoned herself with laudanum.

On top of this, George Wardle worked both for and with William Morris. Morris inherited a fortune that came from arsenic mining, a fortune that he added to by designing and selling wallpapers in which the main pigment was a salt of arsenic.

The poison chain can go on and on-we might mention yet another alleged candidate for Jack the Ripper, Lewis Carroll, who wrote (disapprovingly) of children drinking poisons in Alice in Wonderland: "if you drink much from a bottle marked 'Poison,' it is almost certain to disagree with you, sooner or later."

People find a delicious fascination in viewing at a safe distance the acts of psychopathic murderers and terrorists, but the most effective wielders of poisons around humans are bacteria and those who can manipulate them. They, in truth, are the best of the Great Poisoners, but we cannot understand them without understanding the more traditional poisons as well.

And so this book was born. No more is it Mr. Pugh's breakfast table book, an account of the lives of the great poisoners. It is a tiptoe among murderous herbs and minds, a chance to taste-test in complete safety some of the more interesting poisoners-and their poisons.



Continues...


Excerpted from Poisons by Peter Macinnis Copyright © 2006 by Peter Macinnis. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Dramatis Personae vi

Glossary of Poisons x

Prologue xvi

1 Poison's Children 1

2 A Slew of Poisoners 13

3 Poison and Food 41

4 The Science of Poison 64

5 Poison in the Medicine Chest 81

6 Cosmetic and Domestic Poisons 103

7 Poisoned Workplaces? 120

8 Poisonous Politics 151

9 Poison and War 162

10 Envenomed Fangs and Stings 182

11 The Tiny Poisoners 199

Epilogue 223

Bibliography 225

Acknowledgments 231

Index 233

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)