POJOs in Action

Overview

The standard platform for enterprise application development has been EJB but the difficulties of working with it caused it to become unpopular. They also gave rise to lightweight technologies such as Hibernate, Spring, JDO, iBATIS and others, all of which allow the developer to work directly with the simpler POJOs. Now EJB version 3 solves the problems that gave EJB 2 a black eye-it too works with POJOs. POJOs in Action describes the new, easier ways to develop enterprise Java applications. It describes how to ...

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Overview

The standard platform for enterprise application development has been EJB but the difficulties of working with it caused it to become unpopular. They also gave rise to lightweight technologies such as Hibernate, Spring, JDO, iBATIS and others, all of which allow the developer to work directly with the simpler POJOs. Now EJB version 3 solves the problems that gave EJB 2 a black eye-it too works with POJOs. POJOs in Action describes the new, easier ways to develop enterprise Java applications. It describes how to make key design decisions when developing business logic using POJOs, including how to organize and encapsulate the business logic, access the database, manage transactions, and handle database concurrency. This book is a new-generation Java applications guide: it enables readers to successfully build lightweight applications that are easier to develop, test, and maintain.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
Today’s lightweight Java frameworks liberate you from traditional EJBs, allowing you to work with “Plain Old Java Objects.” Even Sun’s official EJB 3.0 buys into the new paradigm. Ultimately, it’s an easier way to work, but very different. POJOs in Action is your start-to-finish guide to making it happen.

Chris Richardson begins by reviewing the key differences between POJO design and “old-style” EJB 2 design. You’ll walk through a sample application, reviewing key design issues and trade-offs (and considering your technology choices, too). Richardson systematically introduces one well-proven approach to POJO design, in which business logic is implemented through an object-oriented domain model, then presents other valid design alternatives. There’s also a full section on database issues, ranging from search screens to database concurrency.

Whether you plan to use Spring, Hibernate, JDO, iBATIS, or EJB 3.0 itself, this book’s just what the doctor ordered. Bill Camarda, from the March 2006 Read Only

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781932394580
  • Publisher: Manning Publications Company
  • Publication date: 1/15/2006
  • Pages: 456
  • Product dimensions: 7.40 (w) x 9.25 (h) x 1.15 (d)

Table of Contents

1 Developing with POJOs : faster and easier 3
2 J2EE design decisions 31
3 Using the domain model pattern 61
4 Overview of persisting a domain model 95
5 Persisting a domain model with JDO 2.0 149
6 Persisting a domain model with Hibernate 3 195
7 Encapsulating the business logic with a POJO facade 243
8 Using an exposed domain model 289
9 Using the transaction script pattern 317
10 Implementing POJOs with EJB 3 360
11 Implementing dynamic paged queries 407
12 Database transactions and concurrency 451
13 Using offline locking patterns 488
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 10, 2006

    VERY VERY HIGHLY RECOMMENDED!!

    Are you a developer or architect who has mastered the basics of enterprise Java development and you want to learn how to use POJOs and lightweight frameworks effectively? If you are, you're in luck! Author Chris Richardson, has done an outstanding job of writing a book that is a practical guide to using POJOs and lightweight frameworks to develop the back-end logic of enterprise Java applications. Richardson, begins by introducing the concepts of POJOs and lightweight frameworks. Then, he describes the design decisions that you must make when developing the back-end logic of an enterprise Java application. The author continues by describing how to implement business logic using a POJO domain model. Next, he provides an overview of ORM frameworks. Then, the author explains how to use JDO 2 to persist the domain model developed earlier in the book. The author continues by describing how to persist a domain model developed earlier in the book, by using Hibernate, an extremely popular open source framework. Next, he describes how to encapsulate the business logic with a POJO facade, which is a lot easier to develop and test. Then, the author describes how you can dispense with the facade if the business and presentation tiers are running in the same JVM. He also shows you how to implement the business logic using procedural design. The author continues by taking a look at EJB 3 and comparing it to JDO, Hibernate, and Spring. Next, he examinees how to implement search screens that let the user enter search criteria and page through the matching results. He also shows you how to handle concurrent accesses at the database transaction level. Finally, he extends the concepts described earlier in the book to handle database concurrency across a sequence of transactions. You'll learn in this most excellent book, all about key lightweight frameworks: Spring, JDO, Hibernate, and iBATIS. It also covers EJB 3, which embraces POJOs and some of the characteristics of lightweight frameworks.

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