Political Gain and Civilian Pain: Humanitarian Impacts of Economic Sanctions / Edition 256

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Overview

The use of sanctions is increasing in the post-Cold War world. Along with this increase, the international community must ask itself whether sanctions 'work,' in the sense that they incite citizens to change or overthrow an offending government, and whether sanctions are really less damaging than the alternative of war. Here for the first time, sanctions and humanitarian aid experts converge on these questions and consider the humanitarian impacts of sanctions along with their potential political benefits. The results show that often the most vulnerable members of targeted societies pay the price of sanctions, and that in addition, the international system is called upon to compensate the victims for the undeniable pain they have suffered. Well-chosen case studies of South Africa, Iraq, the former Yugoslavia, and Haiti illustrate how much pain the community of states is willing to inflict upon civilians in the quest for political gains. Together with an analytical framework and policy conclusions, this important book seeks to clarify the range of options and strategies to policymakers who impose sanctions and to humanitarian officials who operate in sanctioned environments.

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Editorial Reviews

Development In Practice, Vol. 8, N0. 3, Aug.98 - David Westeood
Political Gain and Civilian Pain does provide a useful review of the issues and complexities faced in dealing with this issue. It covers the arguments in a thorough fashion, and, importantly, ensures that the pain versus gain debate remains on the agenda.
Carol Bellamy
In UNICEF's experience, economic sanctions are blunt instruments that often have a disproportionate impact on the most vulnerable members of society—children. This book explores the consequences of sanctions from various perspectives in four diverse situations. The international community can learn from these experiences that the potential impact on the most vulnerable groups must be carefully appraised before political decisions are imposed.
Political Studies Review, Sept. '99; Vol. 47 No. 4 - Peter Burnell
Combining the insights and proven research experience of specialists both in international humanitarian assistance and economic sanctions . . . Weiss et al. perform a very valuable service in addressing important and neglected issues, in the scholarly way that their previlus contributions to the literature lead us to expect.
Lakhdar Brahimi
The preoccupations and views of all those concerned by economic sanctions are accurately and fairly reflected in the pages of this volume. Field workers from various UN agencies and NG's will be particularly grateful, I believe, for the genuine sympathy and understanding shown by the editors and the authors of case studies when they describe the frustrations and numerous problems with sanctions as their 'bite' increases along with the humanitarian needs of civilians in targeted countries. . . . When economic sanctions are agreed, they should be accompanied by the careful calculations and humanitarian safeguards that the editors recommend. Political Gain and Civilian Pain breaks new ground for applied scholarship. I commend it to diplomats, UN and NGO officials, and academics alike. It is a 'must' for anyone active in this field.
Carol Bellamy
In UNICEF's experience, economic sanctions are blunt instruments that often have a disproportionate impact on the most vulnerable members of society—children. This book explores the consequences of sanctions from various perspectives in four diverse situations. The international community can learn from these experiences that the potential impact on the most vulnerable groups must be carefully appraised before political decisions are imposed.
David Westeood
Political Gain and Civilian Pain" does provide a useful review of the issues and complexities faced in dealing with this issue. It covers the arguments in a thorough fashion, and, importantly, ensures that the "pain versus gain" debate remains on the agenda.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780847687039
  • Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group Inc
  • Publication date: 12/28/1997
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 256
  • Pages: 300
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.67 (d)

Meet the Author

Thomas G. Weiss is Distinguished Professor of Political Science at the Graduate School and University Center, City University of New York. David Cortright is president of the Fourth Freedom Forum. George A. Lopez is professor of government and international relations at the University of Notre Dame and the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies. Larry Minear is co-director and principal researcher of the Humanitarianism and War Project at Brown University's Watson Institute for International Studies.

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Table of Contents

Chapter 1 Foreword Part 2 Theoretical and Historical Perspectives Chapter 3 Introduction Chapter 4 Economic Sanctions and Their Humanitarian Impact: An Overview Chapter 5 Toward a Framework for Analysis Part 6 Four Case Studies Chapter 7 The Humanitarian Consequences of Sanctioning South Africa Chapter 8 The Humanitarian Impact of Economic Sanctions and War in Iraq Chapter 9 Non-forcible and Forcible Sanctions in the Former Yugoslavia Chapter 10 Humanitarian Effects of the Coup and Sanctions in Haiti Part 11 Conclusions Chapter 12 Political Gain and Civilian Pain

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