Political History of Secession to the Beginning of the American Civil War by Daniel Wait Howe, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Political History of Secession to the Beginning of the American Civil War
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Political History of Secession to the Beginning of the American Civil War

by Daniel Wait Howe
     
 

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Unlike some other reproductions of classic texts (1) We have not used OCR(Optical Character Recognition), as this leads to bad quality books with introduced typos. (2) In books where there are images such as portraits, maps, sketches etc We have endeavoured to keep the quality of these images, so they represent accurately the original artefact. Although occasionally

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Unlike some other reproductions of classic texts (1) We have not used OCR(Optical Character Recognition), as this leads to bad quality books with introduced typos. (2) In books where there are images such as portraits, maps, sketches etc We have endeavoured to keep the quality of these images, so they represent accurately the original artefact. Although occasionally there may be certain imperfections with these old texts, we feel they deserve to be made available for future generations to enjoy.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781290341165
Publisher:
HardPress Publishing
Publication date:
01/10/2012
Pages:
692
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.39(d)

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CHAPTER II THE BEGINNINGS OF SECESSION A LTHOUGH slavery was the chief, it was not the only, / factor in causing the secession of the Southern States. From the formation of the government, the North had continually gained while the South had lost in commercial prosperity. The foreign imports that in colonial times went largely to Charleston began going to New York and other Northern cities. The North was increasing far more rapidly than the South in manufactures and in wealth.1 It was claimed by the Southern political leaders that this gain had been brought about largely by unequal legislation, tariff and other laws which, it was asserted, in their practical operations worked chiefly for the benefit of the North and to the detriment of the South, and as early as 1798 there was talk of Virginia and North Carolina organizing a separate confederacy in order to cut loose from the alleged domination of Massachusetts and the other New England States, a project which was discouraged by Jefferson, not on any constitutional grounds, but chiefly because he did not then deem it necessary to resort to secession.2 Benton, after giving the figures showing the great increase of commerce in the North and a corresponding decrease in the South, thus dispassionately and graphically portrays the state of feeling thereby developed in the Southern States: "This is what the dry and naked figures show. To thememory and imagination it is worse; for it is a tradition of the colonies that the South had been the seat of wealth and happiness, of power and opulence; that a rich population covered the land, dispensing a baronial hospitality, and diffusing the felicity which themselves enjoyed; that all waslife, and joy, and affluence then. And this tradition was not without similitude to the reality, as ...

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