Politics

Politics

4.1 32
by Aristotle
     
 

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This volume brings together the three most original and influential ancient Greek treatises on literature. Artistotle's "Poetics" contains his treatment of Greek tragedy: its history, nature, and conventions, with details on poetic diction. Stephen Halliwell makes this seminal work newly accessible with a translation that is both accurate and readable. His… See more details below

Overview

This volume brings together the three most original and influential ancient Greek treatises on literature. Artistotle's "Poetics" contains his treatment of Greek tragedy: its history, nature, and conventions, with details on poetic diction. Stephen Halliwell makes this seminal work newly accessible with a translation that is both accurate and readable. His authoritative introduction traces the work's debt to earlier theorists (especially Plato), its distinctive argument, and the reasons behind its enduring relevance. The essay "On the Sublime," usually attributed to "Longinus" (identity uncertain), was probably composed in the first century A.D.; its subject is the appreciation of greatness ("the sublime") in writing, with analysis of illustrative passages ranging from Homer and Sappho to Plato and Genesis. In this edition, Donald Russell has revised and newly annotated the text and translation by W. Hamilton Fyfe and provides a new introduction. The treatise "On Style," ascribed to an (again unidentifiable) Demetrius, was perhaps composed during the second century B.C. It seems to reflect the theoretical energy of Hellenistic rhetorical works now lost, and is notable particularly for its theory and analysis of four distinct styles. Doreen Innes' fresh rendering of the work is based on the earlier Loeb translation by W. Rhys Roberts. Her new introduction and notes represent the latest scholarship.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"The volumes in the Clarendon Aristotle Series seek to meet the needs of philosophically inclined readers who do not know Greek by providing accurate translations of selected Aristotelian texts accompanied by philosophical commentaries. To these ends, Trevor Saunder's welcome addition to the series...provides a number of useful tools."—The Philosophical Review

"This is a welcome addition to a reputable series. S's translation of the first two books of Aristotle's Politics is in smooth vernacular English, while remaining true to the literal meaning of the Greek text ... The translation given here by S. is especially admirable in that it is clear, consistent, and readable, unlike many recent translations that have tried to capture the almost crabbed style of Aristotle's Greek ... S's commentary is a model of its kind. It is concise, yet informative; covering the major scholarly disputes quite economically, while referring the reader to the best recent discussions of textual and interpretative problems."—John J. Cleary, Classical Review vol.XLVII no.1, 1997

"Each volume in the scrupulously edited series offers literal translations and concise commentaries emphasizing important philosophical issues and holding Aristotle to the same exacting standards that one should expect of a contemporary philosopher ... Trevor Saunders' volume clearly meets the high standards of the Clarendon series ... very accurate and reliable ... Saunders' commentary is also superb: concise and clear, yet packed with information ... Aristotle's dependence on and departure from Plato's politics are nowhere more evident than in Politics I and II; and Saunders frequently puts his extensive knowledge of Plato's Republic, Statesman, and Laws to work in elucidating and evaluating Aristotle's numerous allusions to and criticisms of his former teacher ... This book is a credit to the Clarendon Aristotle series and will prove indispensable for serious students of Aristotle's Politics."—Polis

"Trevor Saunders' Clarendon Aristotle edition of Politics I and II includes a short introduction with a discussion of the relation between the two books, a translation which is a revision of S.'s previous version in the Penguin Classics series, and an informative commentary which is a judicious blend of interpretation and criticism, especially in its assessment of Aristotle's treatment of his predecessors, particularly Plato. Allusions to subsequent political writing, in the broadest sense, include both Bagehot and Cornford's Microcosmographia Academica."—Phronesis

"A welcome addition to the Clarendon Aristotle series is Trevor Saunders's Aristotle, Politics Books I and II. The translation is a revision of Saunders's earlier revision of T.A. Sinclair's version for Penguin. The commentary is full and helpful, but those familiar with Saunders's work on Plato's Laws will not be surprised to discover that the great strength of this volume is the sections in Book II dealing with comparative political systems."—Greece and Rome

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780872203884
Publisher:
Hackett Publishing Company, Inc.
Publication date:
03/01/1998
Series:
Hackett Classics Series
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
384
Sales rank:
456,514
Product dimensions:
5.31(w) x 8.46(h) x (d)

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Book I

Chapter 1. <1252a> Since we see that every city is some kind of association, and every association is organized for the sake of some good (since everything everyone does is for the sake of something seeming to be good), it is clear that all associations aim at something good, and that the one that is most sovereign and encompasses all the others aims at the most sovereign of all goods. And this is the one called the city, the political association.

Now those who assume that the same person is skilled at political rule as at kingship, household management, and mastery of slaves do not speak beautifully. (For they regard each of these <10> as differentiated with respect to manyness or fewness but not in form—a master being over few, a household manager over more, and a political ruler or a king over still more, as if a large household were no different from a small city; as for the political ruler and the king, when one has control himself, they regard him as a king, but as a political ruler when he rules and is ruled by turns in accordance with the propositions of this sort of knowledge. These things, though, are not true.) What is being said will be clear to those who investigate it along the usual path, for just as it is necessary in other cases to divide a compound thing up into uncompounded ones (since these are <20> the smallest parts of the whole), so too with a city, it is by examining what it is composed of that we shall also see more about these rulers, both in what respect they differ from one another and whether it is possible to get hold of anything involving art applicable to each of the things mentioned.

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