The Politics Of Display

Hardcover (Print)
Buy New
Buy New from BN.com
$152.00
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $158.46
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (2) from $158.46   
  • New (1) from $158.46   
  • Used (1) from $161.90   

Overview

The assumption that museum exhibitions, particularly those concerned with science and technology, are somehow neutral and impartial is today being challenged both in the public arena and in the academy. The Politics of Display brings together studies of contemporary and historical exhibitions and contends that exhibitions are never, and never have been, above politics. Rather, technologies of display and ideas about 'science' and 'objectivity' are mobilized to tell stories of progress, citizenship, racial and national difference. The display of the Enola Gay, the aircraft which dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima is a well-known case in point.
The Politics of Display charts the changing relationship between displays and their audience and analyzes the consequent shift in styles of representation towards interactive, multimedia and reflexive modes of display. The Politics of Display brings together an array of international scholars in the disciplines of sociology, anthropology and history. Examples are taken from exhibitions of science, technology and industry, anthropology, geology, natural history and medicine, and locations include the United States of America, Australia, the United Kingdom, France, the Netherlands and Spain.
This book is an excellent contribution to debates about the politics of public culture. It will be of interest to students of sociology, anthropology, cultural studies, museum studies and science studies.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Analyses of contemporary and historical exhibitions demonstrate the ways that technologies of display and ideas about science and objectivity are mobilized to tell stories of progress, citizenship, and racial and national difference. Examples from various sciences and from around the world chart the changing relationship between displays and their audiences. They also analyze the shift in styles of representation towards interactive, multimedia and reflexive modes of display. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

Meet the Author

Sharon Macdonald is lecturer in Social Anthropology at the University of Sheffield. She is author of Remaining Culture (1997), editor of Inside Identities (1993) and co-editor of Theorizing Museums (1996) and The Sociological Review.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

List of figures
Notes on contributors
Preface
1 Exhibitions of power and powers of exhibition: an introduction to the politics of display 1
2 Speaking to the eyes: museums, legibility and the social order 25
3 The visibility of difference: nineteenth-century French anthropological collections 36
4 Reifying race: science and art in Races of Mankind at the Field Museum of Natural History 53
5 Making nature 'real' again: natural history exhibits and public rhetorics of science at the Smithsonian Institution in the early 1960s 77
6 On interactivity: consumers, citizens and culture 98
7 Supermarket science? Consumers and 'the public understanding of science' 118
8 Nations on display: technology and culture in Expo '92 139
9 Strangers in paradise: an encounter with fossil man at the Dutch Museum of Natural History 159
10 Can science museums take history seriously? 173
11 Birth and Breeding: politics on display at the Wellcome Institute for the History of Medicine 183
12 Balancing acts: science, Enola Gay and History Wars at the Smithsonian 197
Afterword: from war to debate? 229
Index 237
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)