Poor Richard's Almanack [NOOK Book]

Overview

This edition of Poor Richard's Almanack contains selections from the apothegms and proverbs, with a brief sketch of the life of Benjamin Franklin.

Poor Richard's Almanack (sometimes Almanac) was a yearly almanac published by Benjamin Franklin, who adopted the pseudonym of "Poor Richard" or "Richard Saunders" for this purpose. The publication appeared continually from 1732 to...
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Poor Richard's Almanack

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Overview

This edition of Poor Richard's Almanack contains selections from the apothegms and proverbs, with a brief sketch of the life of Benjamin Franklin.

Poor Richard's Almanack (sometimes Almanac) was a yearly almanac published by Benjamin Franklin, who adopted the pseudonym of "Poor Richard" or "Richard Saunders" for this purpose. The publication appeared continually from 1732 to 1758. It was a best seller for a pamphlet published in the American colonies; print runs reached 10,000 per year.

Franklin, the American inventor, statesman, and publisher, achieved success with Poor Richard's Almanack. Almanacks were very popular books in colonial America, with people in the colonies using them for the mixture of seasonal weather forecasts, practical household hints, puzzles, and other amusements they offered. Poor Richard's Almanack was popular for all of these reasons, and also for its extensive use of wordplay, with many examples derived from the work surviving in the contemporary American vernacular.

The Almanack contained the calendar, weather, poems, sayings and astronomical and astrological information that a typical almanac of the period would contain. Franklin also included the occasional mathematical exercise, and the Almanack from 1750 features an early example of demographics. It is chiefly remembered, however, for being a repository of Franklin's aphorisms and proverbs, many of which live on in American English. These maxims typically counsel thrift and courtesy, with a dash of cynicism.

In the spaces that occurred between noted calendar days, Franklin included proverbial sentences about industry and frugality. Several of these sayings were borrowed from an earlier writer, Lord Halifax, many of whose aphorisms sprang from, ".... basic skepticism directed against the motives of men, manners, and the age." In 1757, Franklin made a selection of these and prefixed them to the almanac as the address of an old man to the people attending an auction. This was later published as The Way to Wealth, and was popular in both America and England.
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940015142679
  • Publisher: Balefire Publishing
  • Publication date: 9/5/2012
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 65
  • Sales rank: 856,209
  • File size: 5 MB

Meet the Author

Benjamin Franklin (January 17, 1706 – April 17, 1790) was one of the Founding Fathers of the United States. A noted polymath, Franklin was a leading author, printer, political theorist, politician, postmaster, scientist, musician, inventor, satirist, civic activist, statesman, and diplomat. As a scientist, he was a major figure in the American Enlightenment and the history of physics for his discoveries and theories regarding electricity. He invented the lightning rod, bifocals, the Franklin stove, a carriage odometer, and the glass armonica. He formed both the first public lending library in America and the first fire department in Pennsylvania.

Franklin earned the title of "The First American" for his early and indefatigable campaigning for colonial unity; as an author and spokesman in London for several colonies, then as the first United States Ambassador to France, he exemplified the emerging American nation. Franklin was foundational in defining the American ethos as a marriage of the practical and democratic values of thrift, hard work, education, community spirit, self-governing institutions, and opposition to authoritarianism both political and religious, with the scientific and tolerant values of the Enlightenment. In the words of historian Henry Steele Commager, "In a Franklin could be merged the virtues of Puritanism without its defects, the illumination of the Enlightenment without its heat." To Walter Isaacson, this makes Franklin "the most accomplished American of his age and the most influential in inventing the type of society America would become. Franklin, always proud of his working class roots, became a successful newspaper editor and printer in Philadelphia, the leading city in the colonies. He was also partners with William Goddard and Joseph Galloway the three of whom published the Pennsylvania Chronicle, a newspaper that was known for its revolutionary sentiments and criticisms of the British monarchy in the American colonies. He became wealthy publishing Poor Richard's Almanack and The Pennsylvania Gazette. Franklin gained international renown as a scientist for his famous experiments in electricity and for his many inventions, especially the lightning rod.

Franklin became a national hero in America when he pushed Parliament to repeal the unpopular Stamp Act.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 23 )
Rating Distribution

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(9)

4 Star

(4)

3 Star

(4)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(5)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 23 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 16, 2000

    GGGRREEAAT

    This is a very witty, funny, and a great book to live by.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 6, 2014

    I love it !

    It is a godly book

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 14, 2013

    OMG

    I takes too long to load!! This almanack stinks! :( :( :(

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 16, 2012

    Full of advice which is as sound today as the day he wrote it.

    Full of advice which is as sound today as the day he wrote it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 13, 2012

    ¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿

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