Pop-Culture Pedagogy in the Music Classroom: Teaching Tools from American Idol to YouTube

Overview

Teachers the world over are discovering the importance and benefits of incorporating popular culture into the music classroom. The cultural prevalence and the students' familiarity with recorded music, videos, games, and other increasingly accessible multimedia materials help enliven course content and foster interactive learning and participation. Pop-Culture Pedagogy in the Music Classroom: Teaching Tools from American Idol to YouTube provides ideas and techniques for teaching music classes using elements of ...

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Overview

Teachers the world over are discovering the importance and benefits of incorporating popular culture into the music classroom. The cultural prevalence and the students' familiarity with recorded music, videos, games, and other increasingly accessible multimedia materials help enliven course content and foster interactive learning and participation. Pop-Culture Pedagogy in the Music Classroom: Teaching Tools from American Idol to YouTube provides ideas and techniques for teaching music classes using elements of popular culture that resonate with students' everyday lives. From popular songs and genres to covers, mixes, and mashups; from video games such as Dance Dance Revolution and Guitar Hero to television shows like American Idol, this exciting collection offers pedagogical models for incorporating pop culture and its associated technologies into a wide variety of music courses.

Biamonte has collected well-rounded essays that consider a variety of applications. After an introduction, the essays are organized in 3 sections. The first addresses general tools and technology that can be incorporated into almost any music class: sound-mixing techniques and the benefits of using iPods and YouTube. The middle section uses popular songs, video games, or other aspects of pop culture to demonstrate music-theory topics or to develop ear-training and rhythmic skills. The final section examines the musical, lyrical, or visual content in popular songs, genres, or videos as a point of departure for addressing broader issues and contexts. Each chapter contains notes and a bibliography, and two comprehensive appendixes list popular song examples for teaching harmony, melody, and rhythm. Two indexes cross-reference the material by title and by general subject. While written with college and secondary-school teachers in mind, the methods and materials presented here can be adapted to any educational level.

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Editorial Reviews

Journal of Music History Pedagogy
As the cover implies, the essays in this collection address pop music from the 1930s to today, with a heavy emphasis on the roles of technology and the media....While the collection is directed more toward music theory than music history, it provides a wealth of ideas for making history classes more interactive, relevant, and engaging for today’s students....Those already committed to integrating pop culture into the classroom will find plenty of encouragement in this book.
Choice
A dizzying array of technology is now available to assist teachers and students in accessing music. While recorded versions of many genres of music have been readily available for generations, tools such as YouTube.com, Pandora.com, and Grooveshark.com have made a variety of recordings available for free. Additionally, a variety of computer programs and games allow students to mix, analyze, and play with music as never before. In editing Pop-Culture Pedagogy in the Classroom, Biamonte (McGill Univ., Canada) has assembled a timely collection of essays that assist classroom practitioners and those interested in music education. The book deals with pertinent issues such as building listening skills through sound-mixing techniques, integrating aural skills and formal analysis through popular music, and using American Idol to introduce music criticism. The chapters mix explanations of some of the key concepts related to various learning objectives for students with practical ideas and techniques related to how to teach these in the classroom using aspects of popular technology with which students are familiar. A strong complement to Thomas Rudolph's Teaching Music with Technology (2004). Summing Up: Recommended. General readers; upper-division undergraduate students and above.
CHOICE
A dizzying array of technology is now available to assist teachers and students in accessing music. While recorded versions of many genres of music have been readily available for generations, tools such as YouTube.com, Pandora.com, and Grooveshark.com have made a variety of recordings available for free. Additionally, a variety of computer programs and games allow students to mix, analyze, and play with music as never before. In editing Pop-Culture Pedagogy in the Classroom, Biamonte (McGill Univ., Canada) has assembled a timely collection of essays that assist classroom practitioners and those interested in music education. The book deals with pertinent issues such as building listening skills through sound-mixing techniques, integrating aural skills and formal analysis through popular music, and using American Idol to introduce music criticism. The chapters mix explanations of some of the key concepts related to various learning objectives for students with practical ideas and techniques related to how to teach these in the classroom using aspects of popular technology with which students are familiar. A strong complement to Thomas Rudolph's Teaching Music with Technology (2004). Summing Up: Recommended. General readers; upper-division undergraduate students and above.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780810877368
  • Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
  • Publication date: 10/28/2010
  • Pages: 352
  • Product dimensions: 6.20 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Nicole Biamonte is assistant professor of music theory at the Schulich School of Music at McGill University in Montreal. She has published articles in Music Theory Online and Music Theory Spectrum and contributed to the forthcoming collection Rush and Philosophy. She serves on the editorial board of Music Theory Online.

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Table of Contents

Introduction Nicole Biamonte v

Part I General Tools

1 Appreciating the Mix: Teaching Music Listening Skills through Sound-Mixing Techniques Benjamin Bierman 3

2 Pod-Logic: A Guide to Getting the Most out of Your iPod in the Music Classroom Kathleen Kerstetter 19

3 Global Connections via YouTube: Internet Video as a Teaching and Learning Tool Hope Munro Smith 29

Part II Teaching Musicianship and Music Theory

4 Popular Music in the College Music Theory Class: Rhythm and Meter Nancy Rosenberg 47

Appendix A Selected Resources for Popular Music Drum Patterns and Rhythm Software 63

Appendix B Selected Examples of Rhythms and Meters in Popular Music 64

5 Teaching Traditional Music Theory with Popular Songs: Pitch Structures Heather MacLachlan 73

Appendix: Popular-Music Examples for Undergraduate Theory Topics 90

6 Using Pop-Culture Tools to Reinforce Learning of Basic Music Theory as Transformations James R. Hughes 95

7 On the Integration of Aural Skills and Formal Analysis through Popular Music Keith Salley 109

8 Musical Representation in the Video Games Guitar Hero and Rock Band Nicole Biamonte 133

9 DDR at the Crossroads: A Report on a Pilot Study to Integrate Music Video-Game Technology into the Aural-Skills Classroom Brent Auerbach Bret Aarden Mathonwy Bostock 149

10 Turntablism: A Vehicle for Connecting Community and School Music Making and Learning Karen Snell 173

Part III Teaching Music Analysis and Criticism

11 Using American Idol to Introduce Music Criticism James A. Grymes 187

12 An Analytic Model for Examining Cover Songs and Their Sources Victoria Malawey 203

13 Cotextuality in Music Video: Covering and Sampling in the Cover Art Video of "Umbrella" Lori Burns Tamar Dubuc Marc Lafrance 233

14 Vocal Practices and Constructions of Identity in Rap: A Case Study of Young Jeezy's "Soul Survivor" Alyssa Woods 265

15 Crunkology: Teaching the Southern Hip-Hop Aesthetic Ali Colleen Neff 281

16 Mashup Poetics as Pedagogical Practice Wayne Marshall 307

Index 317

About the Authors 341

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