Pope Francis in His Own Words

Pope Francis in His Own Words

by Julie Schwietert Collazo
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

The moment the identity of the newly elected 266th pontiff was revealed, it was clear to the thousands gathered in St. Peter’s Square, and to the watching world, that this pope was different in fascinating and exciting ways — the first from Latin America, the first Jesuit, and the first to take the name Francis, in honor of St. Francis of

Overview

The moment the identity of the newly elected 266th pontiff was revealed, it was clear to the thousands gathered in St. Peter’s Square, and to the watching world, that this pope was different in fascinating and exciting ways — the first from Latin America, the first Jesuit, and the first to take the name Francis, in honor of St. Francis of Assisi.

When Pope Francis, formerly Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio of Buenos Aires, spoke from the balcony of St. Peter’s Basilica, he greeted his audience colloquially: “Brothers and sisters, good evening.” He told a joke, commenting that his fellow cardinals had “gone to the ends of the earth” to find him. Then, downplaying his power and position, he proceeded not to bless the crowd but to ask them for their blessing: “I ask a favor of you,” he said, bowing humbly. “Let us make, in silence, this prayer: your prayer over me.”

Francis has repeatedly foregone the fancy dress, lavish accommodations, and other luxuries of his position, emphasizing pastoral work with the sick and the poor and always seeking to empower the underdog (including his favorite soccer team in Buenos Aires — San Lorenzo). This revealing collection of his own words, gathered from sermons, interviews, and the Pope’s books, prompts understanding and insight into his way of being and believing — and inspires goodwill, love, and hope.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Quotations from Pope Francis in His Own Words:

“The person who is most high among us must be at the service of the others.”
Pope Francis, as he washed, dried, and kissed the feet of young prisoners on his first Holy Thursday as pontiff

“We never lose if we imitate Jesus, if we serve our suffering brothers.”

“To recognize, accept, and live with all ways of thinking and being does not imply the renunciation of one’s own beliefs.”

“A little bit of mercy makes the world less cold and more just.”

“In a society where lies, cover-ups, and hypocrisy have caused people to lose basic trust in the social contract, what could be more revolutionary than the truth?”

“Human history, our history, the history of every one of us is never ‘finished’; it never runs out of possibilities. Rather, it is always opening to the new — to what, until now, we’d never even had in mind. To what seemed impossible.”

Library Journal
It is not difficult to understand the eagerness and even the anxiety of much of the Roman Catholic world as it anticipates the actions and policies of the man so recently elevated to the See of Rome; hence this publication, one of the first to attempt to collect and understand the public utterances of Father Bergoglio, who is now Pope Francis. In truth, there is relatively little to find: most of his words here are either banal or boilerplate prelatry. Not the scholar or the writer his predecessor was, Francis remains largely unguessable. VERDICT For parishes, seminaries, and devout readers—the latter will cling to this little book for clues to the Holy Father's character as leader, but only time will tell. Readers will find more substance in Bergoglio and Rabbi Abraham Skorka's On Heaven and Earth: Pope Francis on Faith, Family, and the Church in the Twenty-First Century.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781608682492
Publisher:
New World Library
Publication date:
04/16/2013
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
160
Sales rank:
668,269
File size:
355 KB

Read an Excerpt

Pope Francis in His Own Words


By Julie Schwietert Collazo, Lisa Rogak

New World Library

Copyright © 2013 Julie Schwietert Collazo and Lisa Rogak
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-60868-249-2


CHAPTER 1

On Age and Aging

Old age, they say, is the seat of wisdom. The old ones have the wisdom that they have earned from walking through life, like old Simeon and Anna at the temple, whose wisdom allowed them to recognize Jesus. Let us give with wisdom to the youth: like good wine that improves with age, let us give the youth the wisdom of our lives.

Address to Cardinals, 15 March 2013

* * *

The old person is the transmitter of history, he who brings us memories, the memory of our people, of our country, of our family, culture, and religion.... He has lived a long time, and even if he's done so as a fool, he deserves serious consideration.

Sobre el Cielo y la Tierra, 2010

* * *

The bitterness of the old person is worse than any other because it is without return.

Sobre el Cielo y la Tierra, 2010


On Argentina

Is it true that Argentinians don't want to dialogue? I wouldn't put it that way. Rather, I think we've become victims of attitudes that don't permit us to dialogue: arrogance, the inability to listen, an exasperation with language ... and so many others.

Sobre el Cielo y la Tierra, 2010

* * *

Our painful political history has all too often courted silence. The use of euphemisms has often anesthetized us.

Homily, Easter 2008

* * *

Argentina has arrived at a moment of critical decision making ... the decision to continue as a country, to learn from its painful experiences of the past and initiate a new path, or to drown in misery, chaos, the loss of values, and decomposition as a society.

Annual Message to Educational Communities, Easter 2002

* * *

I dare to say it still: we Argentinians have a long history of mutual intolerance.

Homily, Easter 2005

* * *

We live in the most unequal part of the world, which has grown the most, yet reduced misery the least. The unjust distribution of goods persists, creating a situation of social sin that cries out to heaven and limits the possibilities of a fuller life for so many of our brothers.

Address, CELAM conference, 21 May 2007


On Argentina's Dirty War

In the Church, there were Christians from [all] camps: Christians who died as guerrillas, Christians who helped save people, and Christian oppressors who believed they were saving the homeland.

Sobre el Cielo y la Tierra, 2010

* * *

We believe that the steps taken by the justice system in clarifying these events must serve to renew the efforts of all citizens toward reconciliation, and are a call to distance ourselves not only from impunity but from hatred and rancor as well. [Any Catholic who participated did so] on his own responsibility, erring and sinning gravely against God, against mankind, and against his own conscience.

Interpress Service, 11 October 2007

* * *

The horrors committed under the military governments were revealed only drip by drip, but for me they are still one of the worst blights on this country.

Sobre el Cielo y la Tierra, 2010


On Argentina's Leaders

Rather than preventing [them], it seems [the Argentinian government has] opted for making inequalities even greater.

Guardian, 13 March 2013


On Art and Artists

Artists know well that beauty isn't solely consoling, but that it can also be disturbing. The grand masters have known how to present with beauty those realities of the human condition that are most tragic and painful.

Speech, ADEPA, 6 April 2006

* * *

Argentina has given the world many writers and artists of quality ... in every genre, from the most traditional to those that express the views of the youngest generations — all saying something about who we are and who we want to be!

Annual Message to Educational Communities, Easter 2006

* * *

His favorite painting:

The White Crucifixion by Marc Chagall

El Jesuita, 2010


On Asking Catholics for Their Prayers

I would like to give you a blessing, but first I want to ask you for a favor. Before the bishop blesses the people, I ask that you pray to the Lord so that He blesses me.

First blessing as Pope, 13 March 2013


On Aspirations

No one can grow if he does not accept his smallness.

Homily, 25 May 2006


On Assisted Suicide

In Argentina there is clandestine euthanasia. Social services pay up to a certain point; if you pass it, "die, you are very old." Today, elderly people are discarded when, in reality, they are the seat of wisdom of the society. The right to life means allowing people to live and not killing, allowing them to grow, to eat, to be educated, to be healed, and to be permitted to die with dignity.

LifeSiteNews.com, 5 October 2007

* * *

[Euthanasia is] a culture of discarding the elderly.

Speech, Aparecida Document, 2 October 2007


On Atheists

I don't say that [the atheist's] life is condemned [to Hell], because I am convinced I don't have the right to pass judgment about the moral uprightness of that person.

Sobre el Cielo y la Tierra, 2010

* * *

Not everyone present belongs to the Catholic faith, and others do not believe. I respect the conscience of each one of you, knowing that each one of you is a child of God. May God bless you.

Vatican press conference, 16 March 2013

* * *

[I] know more agnostics than atheists; the first is more undecided, the second, more convinced.

Sobre el Cielo y la Tierra, 2010


On Baptizing the Children of Single Parents

The child has absolutely no responsibility for the state of his parents' marriage. And often a baptism can be a new start for the parents as well.

30 Giorni, August 2009

* * *

In our ecclesiastical region, there are priests who don't baptize the children of single mothers because they weren't conceived in the sanctity of marriage. These are today's hypocrites: those who clericalize the Church, those who separate the people of God from salvation. And this poor girl who, rather than returning the child to sender, had the courage to carry it into the world, must wander from parish to parish until her child can be baptized!

New York Daily News, 14 March 2013


On Beauty

Few things are more moving than the human need for beauty that all hearts have.

Speech, ADEPA, 6 April 2006

* * *

Because it is human, sometimes beauty is tragic, surprising, moving; on some occasions, it compels us to think about what we do not want or it shows us the error of our ways.

Speech, ADEPA, 6 April 2006


On Being Chosen as Pope

As you know, the duty of the Conclave is to give Rome a bishop. It seems that my brother cardinals went almost to the end of the world. But here we are.

First blessing as Pope, 13 March 2013

* * *

May God forgive you.

First dinner with cardinals after election as Pope, 13 March 2013


On Being Right ... and Wrong

I don't have all the answers. Nor do I have all the questions.... I confess that, in general, because of my temperament, the first response that occurs to me is the wrong one.... It's curious, but that's the way it is with me.

El Jesuita, 2010


On Birth Control

[Anti-condom zealots want to] stick the whole world inside a condom.

Sobre el Cielo y la Tierra, 2010


On Bridezilla Weddings

In some churches — and I don't know how to remedy this, honestly — there is a fierce competition between bridesmaids and brides. These women aren't observing a religious act; they're just showing off. And this weighs on my conscience; as priest, I am permitting this and I haven't found a way to put a stop to it.

Sobre el Cielo y la Tierra, 2010


On Buenos Aires

Distracted city, dispersed city, egotistical city: cry. You need to be purified by your tears.... Let this scatterbrained, superficial city be purified by its grief.

Homily, 30 December 2005

* * *

For many, Buenos Aires is a factory of slaves ... a meat grinder which destroys their lives, breaks their will, and deprives them of freedom.

Vatican Insider, 15 December 2011

* * *

After 52 commuters died when a train crashed into buffers at a railway station in Buenos Aires:

This city does not know how to weep. All is fixed with anesthetics ... virtually all of them were earning their daily bread. With dignity! Father, let us not get used to the idea that to earn your daily bread you must travel like cattle.

Homily, 23 March 2012

* * *

At school they taught us slavery has been abolished, but do you know what? It was a fairy tale! Because in Buenos Aires, slavery has not been abolished; in this city it is still common in various forms; in this city workers are exploited in clandestine workshops and, if they are immigrants, they prevent them from leaving; and in this city there are children who have been living on the streets for years.... In this city women are kidnapped and are submitted to the use and abuse of their bodies, destroying their dignity. There are men here who abuse and make money from human flesh.... Dogs are treated better than these slaves of ours!

Homily, 23 September 2011

* * *

How lovely it is to walk this way, slowly, feeling the presence of others, singing, looking forward, looking at the sky, praying for those who aren't with us in Buenos Aires!

Homily, 24 May 2008

* * *

When I pray for the city of Buenos Aires, I give thanks for the fact that it was the city where I was born.

Address to the First Congress of Regional Urban Parishes, 25 August 2011


On Cardinals

The cardinalate is a service; it is not an award to be bragged about.

Vatican Insider, 24 February 2012

* * *

Cardinals are not NGO representatives, but servants of the Lord, inspired by the Holy Spirit, which is the one [that] is really able to differentiate charismas, unifying them in the Church. A cardinal must be able to differentiate between charismas and at the same time look toward unity, aware that the creator of difference and unity is the Holy Spirit itself. Cardinals who do not enter this frame of mind, in my view, are not cardinals in the way Benedict XVI would like them to be.

Vatican Insider, 24 February 2012


On Catechists

I hope that there is no room among you for apostolic mummies ... please, no! Go to a museum — mummies look better there.

Address at Archdiocese Meeting, 12 March 2005


On Catholic Life

When one does not walk, one halts. When one does not build on stone, what happens? That happens which happens to children on the beach when they make sand castles: it all comes down; it is without substance.

Homily, first papal Mass, 14 March 2013

* * *

To walk, to build, to confess. But the matter is not so easy, because in walking, in building, in confessing, at times there are shocks, there are movements that are not properly movements of the journey: they are movements that set us back.

Homily, first papal Mass, 14 March 2013


On Celibacy in Priests

Yes, hypothetically, western Catholicism could revise the theme of celibacy.... But for the moment, I am in favor of maintaining celibacy, with the pros and the cons it has, because we have ten centuries of more good experiences than bad ones.

Sobre el Cielo y la Tierra, 2010


On Character Flaws

Isn't it fickle, mediocre vanity that makes us build walls, whether they are walls of riches or power, or violence and impunity?

Homily, 25 May 2011

* * *

It astonished and perplexed me when I asked an acquaintance how he was doing and he responded, "Bad, but used to it."

Homily, 22 February 2012


On Child Labor

The promotion and strengthening of work for adults will make it possible to avoid [the phenomenon] of child labor. It's very difficult for a child to go out and look for work if his parents have meaningful work that allows them to provide for their family's needs.

Letter for the Youth, 1 October 2005


On Children

What world are we leaving our children? Maybe it would be better to ask, "What children are we giving this world?"

Homily, 1 September 1999

* * *

We have, in our hands, the responsibility and also the possibility of making this world much better for our children.

Homily, Easter 2005

* * *

We should be cognizant of the emergency facing our children and our young people.

Letter for the Youth, 1 October 2005

* * *

So many children don't know how to pray!

Homily, Ash Wednesday 2004

* * *

Children are mistreated, and are not educated or fed. Many are made into prostitutes and exploited. And this happens here in Buenos Aires, in the great city of the south. Child prostitution is offered in some five-star hotels: it is included in the entertainment menu, under the heading "Other."

Speech, 2 October 2007


On Choices

Each day, we all face the choice to be Good Samaritans or to be indifferent travelers passing by.

Homily, 25 May 2003


On Choosing the Name Francis

The man of the poor. The man of peace. The man who loved and cared for creation — and in this moment we don't have such a great relationship with the creator. The man who gives us this spirit of peace, the poor man who wanted a poor church.

Vatican press conference, 16 March 2013

* * *

Francis is also the man of peace. That is how the name came into my heart: Francis of Assisi. For me, he is the man of poverty, the man of peace, the man who loves and protects creation.

Vatican press conference, 16 March 2013

* * *

[Francis of Assisi] brought to Christianity an idea of poverty against the luxury, pride, [and] vanity of the civil and ecclesiastical powers of the time. He changed history.

Sobre el Cielo y la Tierra, 2010


On the Christian Life

The Christian truth is attractive and persuasive because it responds to the deep needs of human existence, convincingly announcing that Christ is the only Savior of the whole person and of all persons. This announcement is as valid today as it was at the beginning of Christianity, when there was a great missionary expansion of the Gospel.

Address to Cardinals, 15 March 2013

* * *

[Living] the Christian life [means] giving witness with joy, just as Jesus did.

El Jesuita, 2010

* * *

The Christian life is always a walk in the presence of God, but it is not exempt from struggles and trials.

Homily, 11 March 2006

* * *

In the life of every Christian ... there will be the experience of the desert, of interior purification, of the dark night.

Homily, 11 March 2006


On Christmas

What is the spirit of Christmas? Over the years the world of culture has tried to express it in a thousand ways and has managed to take us closer to the meaning of the Christmas spirit. How many Christmas stories bring us closer to this?

La Nación, 23 December 2011


On the Church

We have to avoid the spiritual sickness of a self-referential Church. It's true that when we stray from its path, as can happen to any man or woman, accidents can happen. But if the Church stays enclosed within itself, self-referential, it will grow old. And between a Church that accidentally strays off its path and one that is sick because of self-reference, I have no doubt: I prefer the former.

El Jesuita, 2010

* * *

If, throughout history, the Church has changed so much, I do not see why we should not adapt it to the culture of [our] time.

Sobre el Cielo y la Tierra, 2010

* * *

The Church is Mother and talks to the people as a mother talks to her child, with that confidence that the child already knows that everything he is being taught is for his good, because he knows he is loved.

Speech, "The Sunday Homily in Latin America," 19 January 2005

* * *

The Church was, is, and will continue to be persecuted.

Homily, 23 April 2007

* * *

How I would love a Church that is poor and for the poor.

Vatican press conference, 16 March 2013


(Continues...)

Excerpted from Pope Francis in His Own Words by Julie Schwietert Collazo, Lisa Rogak. Copyright © 2013 Julie Schwietert Collazo and Lisa Rogak. Excerpted by permission of New World Library.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Meet the Author

Julie Schwietert Collazo has written for a variety of magazines, including Time, National Geographic Traveler, and Latina, reporting widely on Latin America. She lives in New York, though she has called San Juan, Puerto Rico,
and Mexico City home as well. Her blog is collazo projects.com.

Lisa Rogak is the New York Times bestselling author of more than forty books and hundreds of newspaper and magazine articles. Her books have been published in more than two dozen languages. She lives in New Hampshire. Her website is lisarogak.com.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >