Popular Culture in American History / Edition 2

Popular Culture in American History / Edition 2

by Jim Cullen
     
 

Introducing almost half a century of the best scholarship on popular culture in the USA, this fully revised second edition has a more focused historical remit, with analysis and primary source material from the 1830s to the present. Each main essay examines a pivotal moment, issue or genre in American popular culture, from the ‘penny press’ to the

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Overview

Introducing almost half a century of the best scholarship on popular culture in the USA, this fully revised second edition has a more focused historical remit, with analysis and primary source material from the 1830s to the present. Each main essay examines a pivotal moment, issue or genre in American popular culture, from the ‘penny press’ to the Internet. Long-term trends, such as the blurring of once-sharp distinctions between ‘high’ and ‘low’ culture, are also explored.

This new edition, along with its extended reading lists, illuminating contextual commentary, and chronologies of major events, make it an ideal undergraduate text for media and cultural studies courses. With enhanced presentation of scholarly and primary source material aimed at prompting and guiding student discussions, this carefully assembled selection offers both a historical overview and detailed cultural analysis.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780470673652
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
03/25/2013
Series:
Wiley Blackwell Readers in American Social and Cultural History Series, #2
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
296
Sales rank:
401,865
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.60(d)

Table of Contents

Notes on Contributors.

Preface: About This Book.

Introduction: The Worldwide Web of Popular Culture.

1. In the Beginning. .

Timeline.

Introduction.

Chapbooks: Reconstructing the Reading of Early America: Victor Neuberg.

Consider the Source: Chapbooks.

Extract from Narrative of the Captivity of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson, 1682.

Suggested Further Reading.

2. The World of the Stage. .

Timeline.

Introduction.

William Shakespeare in America: Lawrence Levine (George Mason University).

Consider the Source: Shakespeare and Early American Theater.

Excerpt from Representative Men by Ralph Waldo Emerson (1850).

Suggested Further Reading.

3. The Racy Appeal of the Minstrel. .

Timeline.

Introduction.

The Blackface Lore Cycle: W. T. Lhamon, Jr. (Florida State University).

Consider the Source: Minstrel Shows.

Excerpts from Nineteenth-Century Minstrel Shows.

Suggested Further Reading.

4. Literature for the Million. .

Timeline.

Introduction.

The Figure of the Dime Novel in American Culture: Michael Denning (Yale University).

Consider the Source: Dime Novel Fiction.

Excerpt from Last of the Great Scouts by Helen Cody Wetmore (1899).

Advertisement for A Knight of Labor by Frederick Whittaker.

Suggested Further Reading.

5. The Romance of the Dance Hall. .

Timeline.

Introduction.

Dance Madness: Kathy Peiss (University of Massachusetts at Amherst).

Consider the Source: Dance Hall Culture.

Excerpt from Elisabeth Marbury's Introduction to Modern Dancing by Vernon and Irene Castle (1914).

Suggested Further Reading.

6. Moving Images.

Timeline.

Introduction.

American Motion Pictures and the New Popular Culture, 1893-1918: Daniel J. Czitrom (Mount Holyoke College).

Consider the Source: Early Motion Pictures.

Excerpt from The Spirit of Youth by Jane Addams (1909).

Suggested Further Reading.

7. Waves of Selling. .

Timeline.

Introduction.

Arguments over Broadcast Advertising: Susan Smulyan (Brown University).

Consider the Source: Radio Advertising.

Excerpt from "Sponsoritis".

Suggested Further Reading.

8. The Firmament of Stardom.

Timeline.

Introduction.

Fool's Paradise: Frank Sinatra and the American Dream: Jim Cullen (Harvard University).

Consider the Source: Frank Sinatra and the American Dream.

"Why the Americans are so Restless in the Midst of their Prosperity," excerpt from Vol. II of Democracy in America by Alexis de Tocqueville (1840).

Suggested Further Reading.

9. The Age of Television. .

Timeline.

Introduction.

The Making of the Sitcom, 1961: David Marc (Syracuse University).

Consider the Source: Sitcoms.

Excerpt from After All by Mary Tyler Moore (1995).

Suggested Further Reading.

10. Hip Hop Nation.

Timeline.

Introduction.

Voices from the Margins: Rap Music and Contemporary Black Cultural Production: Tricia Rose (New York University).

Consider the Source: Hip Hop.

Excerpt from Ladies First by Queen Latifah (1999).

Suggested Further Reading.

Index.

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