Popular Print and Popular Medicine: Almanacs and Health Advice in Early America

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Overview

In this innovative study of the relationship between popular print and popular attitudes toward the body, health, and disease in antebellum America, Thomas A. Horrocks focuses our attention on a publication long neglected by scholars-the almanac. Approaching his subject as both a historian of the book and a historian of medicine, Horrocks contends that the almanac, the most popular secular publication in America from the late eighteenth century to the first quarter of the nineteenth, both shaped and was shaped by early Americans' beliefs and practices pertaining to health and medicine.

Analyzing the astrological, therapeutic, and regimen advice offered in American almanacs over two centuries, and comparing it with similar advice offered in other genres of popular print of the period, Horrocks effectively demonstrates that the almanac was a leading source of health information in America prior to the Civil War. He contends that the almanac was an integral component of a complicated, fragmented, semi-vernacular health literature of the period, and that the genre played a leading role in disseminating astrological health advice as well as shaping contemporary and future perceptions of astrology.

In terms of therapeutic and regimen advice, Horrocks asserts that the almanac performed a complementary role, confirming and reinforcing traditional beliefs and practices. By analyzing the almanac as a cultural artifact that represents a time, a place, and a certain set of assumptions and beliefs, he demonstrates that the genre can provide a lens through which scholars may examine early American attitudes and practices concerning their health in particular and American popular culture ingeneral.

About the Author:
Thomas A. Horrocks is associate librarian for collections at Houghton Library, Harvard University

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Editorial Reviews

Choice
In this well-written little book, Horrocks provides insight to the influence popular health writing - in particular, the almanac - had on the publishing industry in the first part of the nineteenth-century . . . Modern modalities have reestablished, in a different form, home health care, and the epilogue provides an excellent overview of this. . . . The writing is clear, and the illustrations well display the subjects and details provided by these popular publications.
The Midwest Book Review
A deeply scholarly scrutiny of the connections between almanacs and popular culture, and a welcome supplement to college library and early American history shelves.
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Product Details

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations

Introduction Almanacs and the Literature of Popular Health in Early America 1

1 Heavenly Guidance 17

2 Advice for the Afflicted 42

3 Prescribing Prevention 67

4 Health Advice with an Agenda 90

Epilogue 107

Appendix 113

Notes 161

Bibliography 187

Index 213

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