Overview

An updated edition of Thoreau's most widely read works.

Self-described as "a mystic, a transcendentalist, and a natural philosopher to boot," Henry David Thoreau dedicated his life to preserving his freedom as a man and as an artist. Nature was the fountainhead of his inspiration and his refuge from what he considered the follies of society. Heedless of his friends' advice to live in a more orthodox manner, he determinedly pursued his own ...
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The Portable Thoreau

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Overview

An updated edition of Thoreau's most widely read works.

Self-described as "a mystic, a transcendentalist, and a natural philosopher to boot," Henry David Thoreau dedicated his life to preserving his freedom as a man and as an artist. Nature was the fountainhead of his inspiration and his refuge from what he considered the follies of society. Heedless of his friends' advice to live in a more orthodox manner, he determinedly pursued his own inner bent-that of a poet-philosopher-in prose and verse. Edited by noted Thoreau scholar Jeffrey S. Cramer, this edition promises to be the new standard for those interested in discovering the great thinker's influential ideas about everything from environmentalism to limited government.


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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781101128107
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 3/27/2012
  • Series: PORTABLE LIBRARY Series
  • Sold by: Penguin Group
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 656
  • Sales rank: 710,541
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Henry David Thoreau
Henry David Thoreau was born in Concord, Massachusetts in 1817. He graduated from Harvard in 1837, the same year he began his lifelong Journal. Inspired by Ralph Waldo Emerson, Thoreau became a key member of the Transcendentalist movement that included Margaret Fuller and Bronson Alcott. The Transcendentalists' faith in nature was tested by Thoreau between 1845 and 1847 when he lived for twenty-six months in a homemade hut at Walden Pond. While living at Walden, Thoreau worked on the two books published during his lifetime: Walden (1854) and A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849). Several of his other works, including The Maine Woods, Cape Cod, and Excursions, were published posthumously. Thoreau died in Concord, at the age of forty-four, in 1862.
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    1. Also Known As:
      David Henry Thoreau (birth name)
    1. Date of Birth:
      July 12, 1817
    2. Place of Birth:
      Concord, Massachusetts
    1. Date of Death:
      May 6, 1862
    2. Place of Death:
      Concord, Massachusetts

Table of Contents

The Portable Thoreau Introduction by the Editor Chronology Natural History of Massachusetts, 1842
A Winter Walk, 1843
The Maine Woods, 1848
The Wilds of the Penobscot Life in the Wilderness

Civil Disobedience, 1849
A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers, 1849
Poems
I Am a Parcel of Vain Strivings Tied In the Busy Streets, Domains of Trade I Knew a Man by Sight Lately, Alas, I Knew a Gentle Boy Each More Melodious Note I Hear Independence Not Unconcerned Wachusett Rears His Head My Friends, Why Should We Live Low in the Eastern Sky Great Friend Fog Brother Where Dost Thou Dwell This Is My Carnac, Whose Unmeasured Dome Love Equals Swift and Slow Though All the Fates Should Prove Unkind Manhood Between the Traveler and the Setting Sun Nature

A Yankee in Canada, 1853
Concord to Montreal

Walden, 1854
Economy Where I Lived, and What I Lived For Reading Sounds Solitude Visitors The Bean Field The Village The Ponds Baker Farm Higher Laws Brute Neighbors Housewarming Former Inhabitants; and Winter Visitors Winter Animals The Pond in Winter Spring Conclusion

Journal, 1858
Walking, 1862
Life without Principle, 1863

Cape Cod, 1864
The Wellfleet Oysterman

The Last Days of John Brown, 1860
Epilogue by the Editor Further Reading

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 5 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 12, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    For Philosophers and Thoreau/Transcendentalist Scholars only

    This was a very difficult book for me to read as there was too much going on. Thoreau had a wandering mind as well as body, and that comes out quite well in this collection of his works. Unfortunately, I don't like that sort of writing. It always felt like he was rambling and would never stick to one topic. While this is an admirable quality it is also frustrating. There were some interesting parts in this book. I particularly liked aspects of "Civil Disobedience," the chapter in Walden on reading was riveting, and his "Life Without Principles," had some interesting thoughts. And, too be fair, I read through this rather quickly. But, this is a book only for philosophers and Thoreau/Transcendentalist scholars. Average readers should stick with "Civil Disobedience" and Walden.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 19, 2001

    calming

    As a sixteen year old junior, I grasped 'Walden' in an attempt to escape to the true essentials in life. The hectic times of high school as well as trying to deal with a sudden move half-way across the country, 'Walden' helped sand down those tough places in my life. I would absolutely recommend Thoreau, or transcendentalism in general, to anyone in a similar situation.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 2, 2002

    A Great Collection of Essays From A Great Man

    As a Unitrian Universalist I thouroughly enjoyed this book. I recommend reading Civil Disobedience to anyone who wants to learn how to use non-violent methods to protest against war and any other injustices in our own country and around the world. Long Live Thoreau!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 4, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 21, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 18, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

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