A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man: Centennial Edition

( 39 )

Overview

A masterpiece of modern fiction, James Joyce’s semiautobiographical first novel follows Stephen Dedalus, a sensitive and creative youth who rebels against his family, his education, and his country by committing himself to the artist’s life. “I will not serve,” vows Dedalus, “that in which I no longer believe…and I will try to express myself in some mode of life or art as freely as I can.” Likening himself to God, Dedalus notes that the artist “remains within or behind or beyond or above his handiwork, invisible,...

See more details below
Paperback (Mass Market Paperback - Centennial)
$4.95
BN.com price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (42) from $1.99   
  • New (8) from $2.16   
  • Used (34) from $1.99   
Marketplace
BN.com

All Available Formats & Editions

Overview

A masterpiece of modern fiction, James Joyce’s semiautobiographical first novel follows Stephen Dedalus, a sensitive and creative youth who rebels against his family, his education, and his country by committing himself to the artist’s life. “I will not serve,” vows Dedalus, “that in which I no longer believe…and I will try to express myself in some mode of life or art as freely as I can.” Likening himself to God, Dedalus notes that the artist “remains within or behind or beyond or above his handiwork, invisible, refined out of existence, indifferent, paring his fingernails.” Joyce’s rendering of the impressions of childhood broke ground in the use of language. “He took on the almost infinite English language,” Jorge Luis Borges said once. “He wrote in a language invented by himself....Joyce brought a new music to English.” A bold literary experiment, this classic has had a huge and lasting influence on the contemporary novel.
 
With an Introduction by Langdon Hammer

Joyce's semi-autobiographical chronicle of Stephen Dedalus' passage from university student to "independent" artist is at once a richly detailed, amusing, and moving coming-of-age story, a tour de force of style and technique, and a profound examination of the Irish psyche and society.

Read More Show Less

What People Are Saying

From the Publisher
“Joyce’s work is not about the thing—it is the thing itself.”—Samuel Beckett
 
“Admirable.”—Jorge Luis Borges
From the Publisher

“Joyce’s work is not about the thing—it is the thing itself.”—Samuel Beckett

“Admirable.”—Jorge Luis Borges

Alfred Kazin
Joyce dissolved mechanism in literature as effectively as Einstein destroyed it in physics. He showed that the material of fiction could rest upon as tense a distribution and as delicate a balance of its parts as any poem. Joyce's passion for form, in fact, is the secret of his progress as a novelist. He sought to bring the largest possible quantity of human life under the discipline of the observing mind, and the mark of his success is that he gave an epic form to what remains invisible to most novelists...Joyce means many things to different people; for me his importance has always been primarily a moral one. He was perhaps, the last man in Europe who wrote as if art were worth a human life... By living for his art he may yet have given others a belief in art worth living for.
Frank O'Connor
The first page, which looks like a long passage of baby talk, is an elaborate construct that relates the development of the senses to the development of the arts.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780451530158
  • Publisher: Signet Classics
  • Publication date: 6/6/2006
  • Series: Signet Classics Series
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Edition description: Centennial
  • Pages: 288
  • Sales rank: 319,943
  • Product dimensions: 4.22 (w) x 6.90 (h) x 0.74 (d)

Meet the Author

James Joyce

Born in Dublin, Ireland, James Joyce (1882–1941) studied philosophy and languages at the Dublin College of the Royal University. He left Ireland in 1902 and went to Paris, but upon learning that his mother was dying, he returned to Dublin in 1903. After his mother’s death, Joyce taught school in Dublin and met Nora Barnacle, the woman who would be his lifelong companion. Joyce and Nora left Ireland in 1904 and traveled to Trieste, where Joyce taught languages at the Berlitz School. An attack of rheumatic fever in 1907 caused his vision to worsen throughout his life. Apart from one trip back to Dublin in 1912, Joyce spent the rest of his life on the Continent. Wealthy patrons subsidized his writing, and Joyce became the most influential novelist of the twentieth century. His writings include Chamber Music (1907), Dubliners (1914), A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (1916), Exiles (1918), Ulysses (1922), Pomes Penyeach (1927), and Finnegans Wake (1939).
 
Langdon Hammer, author of Hart Crane and Allen Tate: Janus-Faced Modernism and numerous essays on modern and contemporary literature, is the chairman of the English Department at Yale University.

Biography

James Joyce was born in Dublin on February 2, 1882. He was the oldest of ten children in a family which, after brief prosperity, collapsed into poverty. Nonetheless, he was educated at the best Jesuit schools and then at University College, Dublin, where he gave proof of his extraordinary talent.

In 1902, following his graduation, he went to Paris, thinking he might attend medical school there, but he soon gave up attending lectures and devoted himself to writing poems and prose sketches, and formulating an "aesthetic system'." Recalled to Dublin in April 1903 because of the fatal illness of his mother, he circled slowly towards his literary career. During the summer of 1904 he met a young woman from Galway, Nora Barnacle, and persuaded her to go with him to the Continent, where he planned to teach English.The young couple spent a few months in Pola (now in Yugoslavia), then in 1905 moved to Trieste, where, except for seven months in Rome and three trips to Dublin, they lived until June 1915. They had two children, a son and a daughter. His first book, the poems of Chamber Music, was published in London in 1907, and Dubliners, a book of stories, in 1914. Italy's entrance into the First World War obliged Joyce to move to Zürich, where he remained until 1919. During this period he published A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (1916) and Exiles, a play (1918).

After a brief return to Trieste following the armistice, Joyce determined to move to Paris so as to arrange more easily for the publication of Ulysses, a book which he had been working on since 1914. It was, in fact, published on his birthday in Paris, in 1922, and brought him international fame. The same year he began work on Finnegan's Wake, and though much harassed by eye troubles, and deeply affected by his daughter's mental illness, he completed and published that book in 1939. After the outbreak of the Second World War, he went to live in Unoccupied France, then managed to secure permission in December 1940 to return to Zürich. Joyce died there six weeks later, on 13 January 1941, and was buried in the Fluntern Cemetery.

Author biography courtesy of Penguin Group (USA).

Read More Show Less
    1. Date of Birth:
      February 2, 1882
    2. Place of Birth:
      Dublin, Ireland
    1. Date of Death:
      January 13, 1941
    2. Place of Death:
      Zurich, Switzerland
    1. Education:
      B.A., University College, Dublin, 1902
    2. Website:

Read an Excerpt

The spell of arms and voices: the white arms of roads, their promise of close embraces and the black arms of tall ships that stand against the moon, their tale of distant nations. They are held out to say: We are alone-come. And the voices say with them: We are your kinsmen. And the air is thick with their company as they call to me, their kinsman, making ready to go, shaking the wings of their exultant and terrible youth.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 39 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(17)

4 Star

(9)

3 Star

(6)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(5)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 41 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2011

    Confused by errors

    It's hard enough to read to begin with; this version has a lot of typographical errors that make it that much more difficult.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 27, 2012

    HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAH

    OOOOOOOOOOOH IM HAVING A WILD PARTY THIS SAT COME PLEASE!!!!!!

    0 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 4, 2011

    Find another version

    This one has too many strange, miscellaneious typographical characters, making it difficult to read.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 12, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Takes a while

    Took me a couple reads and some research to understand, but it was well worth it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 8, 2002

    Not to be taken lightly

    This book is truly excellent if you are willing to take the time and study it. It is not a book written for simple perusing, and attempts to just read it as a story tend to be discouraging. I must disagree with another reviewer, as I read the book as part of a study on stream of consciousness writing. I highly recommend it. Another interesting perspective is the mazes that the main character gradually emerges from (religion, family, patriotism, etc). Although autobiographical, the book is much more than a tale of one man's life. It took me a short time to get into the book, so don't be turned off right away.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 17, 2001

    Beautiful

    This is absolutely the most beautiful and stunning book I've ever read. If you have any tendency towards the arts in you; if you have a love of words and writing in you; or if you have enough sensitivity to empathize with the artist read this book. Take your time with it and you won't be disappointed.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 3, 2001

    Prime example of growing-up story, clearly identifiable character

    James Joyce's first novel still remains one of the truly greatest of novels,-it is rare in fiction to so strongly believe in a character,-and to also feel for a place,- The monologue about Hell is one of Joyce's best bursts of beautiful poetic prose,- One might want to read the Joyce books in order which they were written,-Starting with the 'Dubliners' and ending with 'The wake',-one thing that is forgotten is what great fun these books are,-equal in entertainment as they are in artistic value,-

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 25, 2000

    Joyce's Best Work!

    Perhaps it is because this book is partly self-narrative that makes it so easy to relate to. Stephen Dedalus is the epitomy of what can happen to us when we deny our true desires, and then, through an epiphony of sorts, recognize our calling. James Joyce is well-known for his difficult literature, and this book is no exception, but those of us who are able to make it through the first chapter are able to experience a masterful piece of classic literature.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 18, 2000

    not stream of consciousness

    just wanted to clarify that this book does not employ the stream of consciousness narrative. this is a common misconception. it would be worthwhile to note however, the manner in which joyce is experimenting with his style which will graduate into SoC in ulysses.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 2, 2000

    The young man

    This is perhaps one of the most understandable of James Joyce's books. Forget Ulysses , this is the book for anybody who wants to experience the stream of consciousness technique.It is not long and gives a good account of the surroundings Joyce himself grew up in. It is true to the title in that it does give a portrait of an artist as a young man. I cannot say anymore than this and usually I say more than this!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 12, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 3, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 13, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 24, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 15, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 19, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 12, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 30, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 25, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 41 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)