Portraiture and Social Identity in Eighteenth-Century Rome

Overview

Portraiture and Social Identity in Eighteenth-Century Rome' sheds new light on the relationship between portraiture, social affirmation and the myth of Antiquity as it was experienced and elaborated in eighteenth-century Rome. Drawing upon a wealth of unpublished documents and previously unexamined literary texts, it offers new insights and readings into how the experience of the City in terms of abstract or concrete appropriation affected the ways of portraying native or visiting elite sitters. The Grand Tour ...

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Overview

Portraiture and Social Identity in Eighteenth-Century Rome' sheds new light on the relationship between portraiture, social affirmation and the myth of Antiquity as it was experienced and elaborated in eighteenth-century Rome. Drawing upon a wealth of unpublished documents and previously unexamined literary texts, it offers new insights and readings into how the experience of the City in terms of abstract or concrete appropriation affected the ways of portraying native or visiting elite sitters. The Grand Tour portrait, usually discussed as a purely British phenomenon, is here put in its original context of production and compared to the portraits of the Romans themselves.

'Portraiture and social identity in eighteenth-century Rome' will become essential reading for anyone with a particular interest in eighteenth-century art and its social use.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780719075964
  • Publisher: Manchester University Press
  • Publication date: 12/22/2009
  • Pages: 174
  • Product dimensions: 6.30 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Sabrina Norlander Eliasson is Assistant Director at the Swedish School for Classical Studies in Rome and is affiliated with the Research Department at the National Museum of Fine Arts in Stockholm

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Table of Contents

List of figures

Acknowledgements

1 Introduction

The European elite and the use of 'Rome'

The Grand Tour: complex contradictions on foreign and familiar grounds

Different approaches to portraiture

Antiquity and portraiture: a new mythology for socially reliable portraits

2 Of Rome or in Rome? Laying claim to the imaginary and the real

Landowning, archaelogy and social legitimacy

'No history, surely, can be so interesting to us as that of the Romans'

'The charms of simple nature': the foreign landscape and the country house context

Reinforcing foreignness: the Van Dyck costume in the Grand Tour portrait

Purchasing and selling antiques: gaining and losing social prestige

3 Mythological adaptations: Gender and social identiy

A Trojan hero and a princee of Latium at an eighteenth-century wedding

'Lady, everything in you is Great': Diana/Artemis and the ambiguities of female virtue

'Before marriage their women are nuns, and after it libertines': the multiple roles of Cleopatra

The seductive pearl: marriage codex and sexuality

'A number of raw boys': social transition and initiation on the Grand Tour

On the move: initiation and expected change on the Grand Tour

From bachelor to married man: sexual initiation and homosociability on the Tour 4

4 'FARE ACCADEMIA': Arcadiandiscourse and social preservation.

The Accademia dell'Arcadia: a story of literary and social compromise

The elite in Arcadia: socialbility and pastoral disguise

'A sweet bride and a wise lady': the duplicate roles of a shepherdess

Shepherds on Tour: British travellers in Arcadia

The Arcadian landscape and the Grand Tour portrait

Movement and change in Arcadia

A Museum context: learning and display as Arcadian virtue

Conclusion

Bibliography

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