Post Captain (Aubrey-Maturin Series #2)

Post Captain (Aubrey-Maturin Series #2)

4.4 34
by Patrick O'Brian
     
 

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"The best historical novels ever written..."
-The New York Times Book Review

"They're funny, they're exciting, they're informative. There are legions of us who gladly ship out time and time again under Captain Aubrey."
-The New Yorker

Post Captain is the second novel in Patrick O'Brian's beloved adventure series.

Overview

"The best historical novels ever written..."
-The New York Times Book Review

"They're funny, they're exciting, they're informative. There are legions of us who gladly ship out time and time again under Captain Aubrey."
-The New Yorker

Post Captain is the second novel in Patrick O'Brian's beloved adventure series. In 1803 Napoleon smashes the Peace of Amiens, and Captain Jack Aubrey, Royal Navy, taking refuge in France from his creditors, is interned. He escapes from France, from debtors' prison, from a possible mutiny, and pursues his quarry straight into the mouth of a French-held-harbor. Stephen Maturin's struggles, with himself as much as with a proud and intelligent woman, are woven into Aubrey's, straining their friendship at times to the breaking point.

Editorial Reviews

Richard Snow
"The best historica novel ever written." -- New York Times
A. S. Byatt
“Gripping and vivid… a whole, solidly living world for the imagination to inhabit.”
New York Times
“The best historical novels ever written.”
Washington Post
The Aubrey-Maturin series… far beyond any episodic chronicle, ebbs and flows with the timeless tide of character and the human heart.— Ken Ringle
Chicago Sun-Times
There is not a writer alive whose work I value over his.— Stephen Becker
The New Yorker
“They're funny, they're exciting, they're informative.... There are legions of us who would gladly ship out time and time again under Captain Aubrey.”
New Republic
Patrick O’Brian is unquestionably the Homer of the Napoleonic wars.
Observer
“The best thing afloat since Horatio Hornblower.”
Boston Globe
I haven’t read novels [in the past ten years] except for all of the Patrick O’Brian series. It was, unfortunately, like tripping on heroin. I started on those books and couldn’t stop.— E. O. Wilson
New York Times Book Review
The best historical novels ever written… On every page Mr. O’Brian reminds us with subtle artistry of the most important of all historical lessons: that times change but people don’t, that the griefs and follies and victories of the men and women who were here before us are in fact the maps of our own lives.— Richard Snow
Slate
I devoured Patrick O’Brian’s 20-volume masterpiece as if it had been so many tots of Jamaica grog.— Christopher Hitchens
George Will
“O’Brian’s Aubrey-Maturin volumes actually constitute a single 6,443-page novel, one that should have been on those lists of the greatest novels of the 20th century.”
Iris Murdoch and John Bayley
“Aubrey and Maturin compose one of those complex and fascinating pairs of characters which have inspired thrilling stories of all kinds since the Iliad.”
Taranaki Herald [New Zealand]
“One of the finest seafaring novels of the Napoleonic wars.”
Richard Snow - New York Times Book Review
“The best historical novels ever written… On every page Mr. O’Brian reminds us with subtle artistry of the most important of all historical lessons: that times change but people don’t, that the griefs and follies and victories of the men and women who were here before us are in fact the maps of our own lives.”
Christopher Hitchens - Slate
“I devoured Patrick O’Brian’s 20-volume masterpiece as if it had been so many tots of Jamaica grog.”
James Hamilton-Paterson - New Republic
“Patrick O’Brian is unquestionably the Homer of the Napoleonic wars.”
Keith Richards
“I fell in love with his writing straightaway, at first with Master and Commander. It wasn’t primarily the Nelson and Napoleonic period, more the human relationships. …And of course having characters isolated in the middle of the goddamn sea gives more scope. …It’s about friendship, camaraderie. Jack Aubrey and Stephen Maturin always remind me a bit of Mick and me.”
Tamar Lewin - New York Times
“It has been something of a shock to find myself—an inveterate reader of girl books—obsessed with Patrick O’Brian’s Napoleonic-era historical novels… What keeps me hooked are the evolving relationships between Jack and Stephen and the women they love.”
David Mamet - New York Times
“[O’Brian’s] Aubrey-Maturin series, 20 novels of the Royal Navy in the Napoleonic Wars, is a masterpiece. It will outlive most of today’s putative literary gems as Sherlock Holmes has outlived Bulwer-Lytton, as Mark Twain has outlived Charles Reade.”
Ken Ringle - Washington Post
“The Aubrey-Maturin series… far beyond any episodic chronicle, ebbs and flows with the timeless tide of character and the human heart.”
Stephen Becker - Chicago Sun-Times
“There is not a writer alive whose work I value over his.”
E. O. Wilson - Boston Globe
“I haven’t read novels [in the past ten years] except for all of the Patrick O’Brian series. It was, unfortunately, like tripping on heroin. I started on those books and couldn’t stop.”

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780007255849
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
08/28/2007
Series:
Aubrey-Maturin Series, #2

What People are saying about this

Iris Murdoch
"Aubrey and Maturin compose one of the those complex and fascinating pairs of characters which have inspired thrilling stories of all kinds since the 'Iliad'." -- Iris Murdoch and John Bayley
Mary Renault
Master and Commander raised almost dangerously high expectations… Post Captain triumphantly surpasses them… a brilliant book.
Keith Richards
I fell in love with his writing straightaway, at first with Master and Commander. It wasn’t primarily the Nelson and Napoleonic period, more the human relationships. …And of course having characters isolated in the middle of the goddamn sea gives more scope. …It’s about friendship, camaraderie. Jack Aubrey and Stephen Maturin always remind me a bit of Mick and me.
Iris Murdoch and John Bayley
Aubrey and Maturin compose one of those complex and fascinating pairs of characters which have inspired thrilling stories of all kinds since the Iliad.
A. S. Byatt
Gripping and vivid… a whole, solidly living world for the imagination to inhabit.
George Will
O’Brian’s Aubrey-Maturin volumes actually constitute a single 6,443-page novel, one that should have been on those lists of the greatest novels of the 20th century.

Meet the Author

Patrick O'Brian's acclaimed Aubrey/Maturin series of historical novels has been described as "a masterpiece" (David Mamet, New York Times), "addictively readable" (Patrick T. Reardon, Chicago Tribune), and "the best historical novels ever written" (Richard Snow, New York Times Book Review), which "should have been on those lists of the greatest novels of the 20th century" (George Will).Set in the Royal Navy during the Napoleonic Wars, O'Brian's twenty-volume series centers on the enduring friendship between naval officer Jack Aubrey and physician (and spy) Stephen Maturin. The Far Side of the World, the tenth book in the series, was adapted into a 2003 film directed by Peter Weir and starring Russell Crowe and Paul Bettany. The film was nominated for ten Oscars, including Best Picture. The books are now available in hardcover, paperback, and e-book format.In addition to the Aubrey/Maturin novels, Patrick O'Brian wrote several books including the novels Testimonies, The Golden Ocean, and The Unknown Shore, as well as biographies of Joseph Banks and Picasso. He translated many works from French into English, among them the novels and memoirs of Simone de Beauvoir, the first volume of Jean Lacouture's biography of Charles de Gaulle, and famed fugitive Henri Cherrière's memoir Papillon. O'Brian died in January 2000.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
December 12, 1914
Date of Death:
January 2, 2000
Place of Birth:
Chalfont St. Peter, Buckinghamshire
Place of Death:
Dublin, Ireland
Education:
Shebbear College, Devon
Website:
http://www.wwnorton.com/pob/pobhome.htm

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Post Captain 4.4 out of 5 based on 1 ratings. 34 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is the second of the O'Brian books that I have purchased. I am now on my fourth or fifth of the series.They are a good read, action interlaced with a good deal of naval and natural history. Caution must be exercised since this series is addictive.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Post Captian is one of O'Brian's greatest books. I had to tear myself away from it last Sunday, so I could go to bed. It has something for everyone from action to friendship to romance. However, I do think the government of England has been a bit unfair to Jack. I mean they are making him pay even thousand pounds for the late Sophie and he was doing everything he could to keep it out of enemy hands. Now, I certainly hope no one makes him pay for what happened to the Polychrest. For one thing, that was not a very good ship, and for another, he ahd managed to take the Faciulla as a prize. I hope I get the chance to read more of the Aubrey Maturin Novels for school.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This, the second installment in the Aubrey-Maturin series, delves deeper into its main charcters' attributes and personal lives. As ever, O'Brian brings his literary protagonists to life with a zeal that does not diminish the novel's historical accuracy in any manner. You learn to love Jack Aubrey and Stephen Maturin again, and grow to hate others. And though I am no fan of romance in novels, I developed such sympathy for O'Brian's people that I could not look away from the print; an excellent turn on Mr. O'Brian's part, indeed.
prof_steve More than 1 year ago
More relationship and not as much seamanship as I was expecting but it does a good job at fleshing out the characters in this series.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Book 2 in the Aubrey/Maturin series, Post Captain, takes a dramatic turn veering sharply from the highly-technical and action-packed tone in Master & Commander. If you are expecting something very similar to Book 1, you won't find it, as this book delves deeply into the character and motivations of these characters when they are not at sea in a dramatic fashion. O'Brian's strength is in his technical writing, his historical accuracy, and in his ability to convey the action of a ship-to-ship battle. His weakness is in his writing of female characters who come off as unidimensional, particularly in Post Captain. Book 2 demonstrates very little of his strengths and very much of his weaknesses, though it should be read to put context to the rest of the series which is better written, more engaging, and definitely worth reading through Book 2 to get to.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Read house of horrors last post in first res.
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PainFrame More than 1 year ago
Can you create a unicorn by longing?  Book two of the Aubrey/Maturin series. I have a feeling this series will stand up forever. It’s just so well done, from the research, to the authenticity, to the classiness of the writing itself. It’s charming and beautiful and a hell of a pleasure to read. The relationship between Jack and Stephen is still my favorite thing and continues to delight me. This is a wonderful series, O’Brian has recreated a real living and breathing world and I’m reading it slow because I don’t want it to end.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book continues the story of Aubrey and Maturin and even surpasses its predecessor with rollicking action, engrossing backstory, more humor, and an exquisiteness of detail that convinces me that O'Brian must have lived through all this in a previous life and is writing what he remembers. There is no filler in this book -- something happens on every page.
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Mistermack More than 1 year ago
Second time around for Patrick O'Brian,s Aubrey/Maturin series. Enjoying it even more this time. Each book is a giant chapter. Every one stands on its own. A great read.
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