Postcards from the Apocalypse

Postcards from the Apocalypse

5.0 3
by Allan Leverone
     
 

A dying city, cut off from the rest of civilization. A midnight visit by three people to a deserted graveyard from which only two will return. A young woman who haunts the nightclubs of the city in an endless search to find the man who ruined her life... All these stories and many more tales of noir, crime and dark fiction are featured in this shocking collection from…  See more details below

Overview

A dying city, cut off from the rest of civilization. A midnight visit by three people to a deserted graveyard from which only two will return. A young woman who haunts the nightclubs of the city in an endless search to find the man who ruined her life... All these stories and many more tales of noir, crime and dark fiction are featured in this shocking collection from author Allan Leverone.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940012525550
Publisher:
Rock Bottom Books
Publication date:
12/27/2010
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
330,477
File size:
434 KB

Meet the Author

Allan Leverone is a three-time Derringer Award Finalist for excellence in short mystery fiction as well as a 2011 Pushcart Prize nominee. His short fiction has appeared in a wide variety of print and online magazines, including Needle: A Magazine of Noir, Shroud Magazine, Twisted Dreams, A Twist of Noir, Mysterical-E, and many others.

POSTCARDS FROM THE APOCALYPSE includes all of Allan's Derringer-nominated stories, the Pushcart-nominated "Dance Hall Drug," featured in the Autumn 2010 issue of Dark Valentine Magazine, as well as thirteen other chilling tales.

Allan's debut novel, a thriller titled FINAL VECTOR, will be available February 1 from Medallion Press. He lives in Londonderry, New Hampshire with his wife Sue, three children, one beautiful granddaughter, and a cat who has used up eight lives.

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Postcards from the Apocalypse 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
TTCole More than 1 year ago
Unreliable narrators, terrible deaths, robbery, women as dangerous as they are beautiful, fast cars, horrific crashes, and betrayal. Whether the story is about a kid with telepathic powers or a quarantined city or a guy who won't stay dead, at least one of those seven elements above plays a part. Postcards from the Apocalypse by Allan Leverone is a collection of seventeen short stories that definitely delivers. In his introduction, Leverone promised readers horror, noir, crime, and fantastical. He promised readers that a character who does wrong will certainly get wronged in return and, if that doesn't happen, there will be a suprise plot twist. Leverone is a guy who can keep a promise. I'm so accustomed to horror and crime fiction that it generally takes me five minutes or less to see where a story is going and what the 'twist' will be. That didn't happen as much with these stories. I found myself pleasantly surprised and pleasantly left with a sense of dread almost every time. I put stars next to short stories I particularly liked. Out of the seventeen, eight really stuck with me on a deeper level. 'Devotion' enthusiastically got two stars before I even finished reading it. Though I figured out the twist halfway through, it was in such a way that made me smile in fascination at the morbidity of it. I instantly thought of Edgar Allan Poe. 'The Bridal Veil' also got a smile out of me. It starts off stereotypically, almost as if Leverone wanted readers accustomed to the horror genre to think,"Really?" But the story itself is a wonderful trap I loved being pushed into. 'Fallout,' 'Independence Day,' 'The Wheels on the Bus,' and 'Dance Hall Drug' stuck with me because of their beauty - beauty in language, emotional depth, and plot. They were the three stories that made me sit in awe at what I'd just read, unable to do anything but feel sad and uneasy. In contrast, 'The Road to Olathe,' 'Uncle Brick and Jimmy Kills,' and 'Uncle Brick and the Little Devilz' had a more lighthearted feel to them that made me smile a lot. The small introductions before each short story was a very nice addition. I loved learning where the ideas came from and where they were published. By the end of this collection, I found myself very inspired by his successes in publishing and competitions, and I also realized something... Allan Leverone won my admiration very early on, and he's an author who writes stories well worth keeping up with.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Little over 300 pages very good set of short stoties the two uncle brick ones werr great even if not my normal reads