Postcolonialism / Edition 1

Postcolonialism / Edition 1

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by Robert J. C. Young
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0631200711

ISBN-13: 9780631200710

Pub. Date: 07/28/2001

Publisher: Wiley

This key new introduction, by one of the leading exponents in the field, explains in clear and accessible language the historical and theoretical origins of post-colonial theory. Acknowledging that post-colonial theory draws on a wide, often contested, range of theory from different fields, Young analyzes the concepts and issues involved, explains the meaning of

Overview

This key new introduction, by one of the leading exponents in the field, explains in clear and accessible language the historical and theoretical origins of post-colonial theory. Acknowledging that post-colonial theory draws on a wide, often contested, range of theory from different fields, Young analyzes the concepts and issues involved, explains the meaning of key terms, and interprets the work of some of the major writers concerned, to provide an ideal introductory guide for those undergraduates or academics coming to post-colonial theory and criticism for the first time.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780631200710
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
07/28/2001
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
510
Product dimensions:
6.80(w) x 9.70(h) x 1.50(d)

Table of Contents

1. Colonialism and the Politics of Postcolonial Critique.

Part I: Concepts in History:.

2. Colonialism.

3. Imperialism.

4. Neocolonialism.

5. Postcolonialism.

Part II: European Anti-colonialism:.

6. Las Casas to Burke.

7. Nineteenth-century Liberalism.

8. Marx on Colonialism and Imperialism.

Part III: The Internationals:.

9. Socialism and Nationalism: The First International to the Russian Revolution.

10. The Third International, to the Baku Congress of the Peoples of the East.

11. The Women's International, the Third and the Fourth Internationals.

Part IV: Theoretical Practices of the Freedom Struggles:.

12. The National Liberation Movements: Introduction.

13. Marxism and the National Liberation Movements.

14. China, Egypt, Bandung.

15. Latin America I: Mariátegui, Transculturation and Cultural Dependency.

16. Latin America II: Cuba: Guevara, Castro and the Tricontinental.

17. Africa I: Anglophone African Socialism.

18. Africa II: Nkrumah and Pan-Africanism.

19. Africa III: The Senghors and Francophone African Socialism.

20. Africa IV: Fanon/Cabral.

21. The Subject of Violence: Algeria, Ireland.

22. India I: Marxism in India.

23. India II: Gandhi's Counter-modernity.

Part V: Formations of Postcolonial Theory:.

24. India III: Hybridity and Subaltern Agency:.

25. Women, Gender and Anti-colonialism.

26. Edward Said and Colonial Discourse.

27. Foucault in Tunisia.

28. Subjectivity and History: Derrida in Algeria.

Epilogue: Tricontinentalism, for a Transnational Social Justice.

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Postcolonialism 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
There are other books on postcolonialism, but this one stands head and shoulders above them. Unlike other postcolonial writers, Young does not treat postcolonialism as one long ideological debate. All the ones I've read tend to focus on the ideas of Fanon, Said, Spivak, Bhabha while ignoring the social movements and individuals whose struggles against colonialism make the discussion possible. Actually, Fanon is the exception here, but that only proves the rule. Young traces the rise of anticolonial movements and ideologies and their development into postcolonialism. As Young shows, the anticolonialists of the early 20th century didn't simply provide a starting point for later thinkers, but took positions which are still influential today. The Comintern. Young is the only author I've seen who even broaches the subject. He does and excellent job portraying the Comintern's attempt to develop a coherent policy towards anticolonial struggles without glossing over the contradictions. Young also expands his scope to include those not ususally discussed in studies of postcolonialism: Mariartegui, Cabral,Cesaire, even James Connolly. My only disagreement is with his assessment of Gandhi. Young puts forth a creative interpretation of Gandhi's tactics and their effects, particularly in destabilizing meanings. I, however, disagree with the idea that such tactics led to the liberation of India, but that's a whole other discussion. Overall, this is an excellent introduction to the topic which covers far more ground than any other book in the field.