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Postmortem (Kay Scarpetta Series #1)

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Under cover of night in Richmond, Virginia, a human monster strikes, leaving a gruesome trail of stranglings that has paralyzed the city. Medical examiner Kay Scarpetta suspects the worst: a deliberate campaign by a brilliant serial killer whose signature offers precious few clues. With an unerring eye, she calls on the latest advances in forensic research to unmask the madman. But this investigation will test Kay like no other, because it's being sabotaged from within and ...
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Postmortem (Kay Scarpetta Series #1)

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Overview

Under cover of night in Richmond, Virginia, a human monster strikes, leaving a gruesome trail of stranglings that has paralyzed the city. Medical examiner Kay Scarpetta suspects the worst: a deliberate campaign by a brilliant serial killer whose signature offers precious few clues. With an unerring eye, she calls on the latest advances in forensic research to unmask the madman. But this investigation will test Kay like no other, because it's being sabotaged from within and someone wants her dead.

To tie in with Cornwell's latest hardcover from Scribners, Cruel and Unusual, Avon reissues the chilling debut novel that won this author an Edgar Award for Best First Mystery. While working on a case of serial murders, gutsy forensic pathologist Kay Scarpetta discovers that the killer is now after her. $2.00 consumer rebate. Reissue.

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Editorial Reviews

.. Los Angeles Times
Dazzling....Fascinating....A first-rate thriller.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Cornwell, a former reporter who has worked in a medical examiner's office, sets her first mystery in Richmond, Virginia. Chief medical officer for the commonwealth of Virginia, Dr. Kay Scarpetta, the narrator, dwells on her efforts to identify "Mr. Nobody,'' the strangler of young women. The doctor devotes days and nights to gathering computer data and forensic clues to the killer, although she's hampered by male officials anxious to prove themselves superior to a woman. Predictably, Scarpetta's toil pays off, but not before the strangler attacks her; a reformed male chauvinist, conveniently nearby, saves her. Although readers may be naturally disposed to admire Scarpetta and find the novel's scientific aspect interesting, they are likely to be put off by her self-aggrandizement and interminable complaints, annoying flaws in an otherwise promising debut.
From the Publisher
Los Angeles Times Dazzling...fascinating...a first-rate thriller.

The New York Times Book Review Reads like gangbusters!

San Diego Union-Tribune Terrifying...clean, crisp and compelling...highly satisfying.

Newsday Excellent...well-paced, well-written...beautifully done.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780816158645
  • Publisher: Cengage Gale
  • Publication date: 1/28/1994
  • Series: Kay Scarpetta Series , #1
  • Format: Library Binding
  • Edition description: LARGEPRINT
  • Pages: 441

Meet the Author

Patricia  Cornwell

Patricia Cornwell is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of the Kay Scarpetta series. Her bestsellers include Dust, The Bone Bed, Red Mist, and Portrait of a Killer: Jack the Ripper-Case Closed. Her earlier works include Postmortem—the only novel to win five major crime awards in a single year—and Cruel and Unusual, which won Britain’s prestigious Gold Dagger Award for the best crime novel. Dr. Kay Scarpetta was awarded the 1999 Sherlock Award for the best detective created by an American author. Patricia Cornwell lives in Boston, Massachusetts.

Web: patriciacornwell.com

Facebook: patricia.cornwell

Twitter: @1pcornwell

Lindsay Crouse received an Oscar® nomination for her performance in Places in the Heart and her film credits include The Insider and Prefontaine.

Biography

Patricia Cornwell writes crime fiction from an unusually informed point of view. While many writers are, as she says, conjuring up "fantasy" assumptions regarding what really goes into tracking criminals and examining crime scenes, Cornwell really does walk the walk, which is why her novels ring so true.

Before becoming one of the most widely recognized, respected, and read writers in contemporary crime fiction, she worked as a police reporter for The Charlotte Observer and as a computer analyst in the chief medical examiner's office in Virginia. During this period of her life, Cornwell observed literally hundreds of autopsies. While the vast majority of people would surely regard such work unsavory beyond belief, Cornwell was acquiring valuable information that would not only help her write the groundbreaking 2002 study Portrait of a Killer: Jack the Ripper -- Case Closed but would also enrich her fiction with uncommon authenticity.

"Most of these crime scene shows... are what I call ‘Harry Potter' policing," she said in a candid, heated interview. "They're absolutely fantasy. And the problem is the general public watches these, 60 million people a week or whatever, and they think what they're seeing is true." If Cornwell comes off as a bit vehement in her criticism of television shows meant to simply entertain, that's just because she takes her work so seriously.

Not that Cornwell's novels are ever anything short of entertaining, even if their grisly details may require extra-strong stomachs of her readers. She has created a tremendously well-defined and complex character in her favorite fictional crime solver Dr. Kay Scarpetta. Cornwell introduced medical examiner Scarpetta in her first novel, Postmortem in 1990. Today, Scarpetta is still cracking cases and cracking open cadavers. (She has even inspired a cook book called Food to Die For: Secrets from Kay Scarpetta's Kitchen.) In addition, Cornwell writes more lighthearted cop capers in her Andy Brazil & Judy Hammer series.

Good To Know

Cornwell knows what its like to shatter records. Her debut, Postmortem, was the only novel by a first-time author to ever win five major mystery awards in a single year.

Cornwell may be a former crime solver, but she shudders to think that her books could actually contribute to crime. In fact, she says she has received "thank you" notes from prisoners who claim they have gleaned information from her books that might help them cover their tracks while committing future crimes.

If parody is indeed the sincerest form of flattery, then Cornwell has a fan in Chris Elliott. The professional wisenheimer published a hilarious takeoff on her true crime book Portrait of a Killer called The Shroud of the Thwacker.

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    1. Also Known As:
      Patricia Daniels Cornwell (full name)
    2. Hometown:
      Boston, MA and New York, NY
    1. Date of Birth:
      June 9, 1956
    2. Place of Birth:
      Miami, Florida
    1. Education:
      B.A. in English, Davidson College, 1979; King College
    2. Website:

Read an Excerpt

From Chapter One

It was raining in Richmond on Friday, June 6.

The relentless downpour, which began at dawn, beat the lilies to naked stalks, and blacktop and sidewalks were littered with leaves. There were small rivers in the streets, and newborn ponds on playing fields and lawns. I went to sleep to the sound of water drumming the slate roof, and was dreaming a terrible dream as night dissolved into the foggy first hours of Saturday morning.

I saw a white face beyond the rain-streaked glass, a face formless and inhuman like the faces of misshapen dolls made of nylon hose. My bedroom window was dark when suddenly the face was there, an evil intelligence looking in. I woke up and stared blindly into the dark. I did not know what had awakened me until the telephone rang again. I found the receiver without fumbling.

"Dr. Scarpetta?"

"Yes." I reached for the lamp and switched it on. It was 2:33 A.M. My heart was drilling through my ribs.

"Pete Marino here. We got us one at 5602 Berkley Avenue. Think you better come."

The victim's name, he went on to explain, was Lori Petersen, a white female, thirty years old. Her husband had found her body about half an hour earlier.

Details were unnecessary. The moment I picked up the receiver and recognized Sergeant Marino's voice, I knew. Maybe I knew the instant the telephone rang. People who believe in werewolves are afraid of a full moon. I'd begun to dread the hours between midnight and 3:00 A.M. when Friday becomes Saturday and the city is unconscious.

Ordinarily, the medical examiner on call is summoned to a death scene. But this wasn't ordinary. I had made it clear after the second case that no matter thehour, if there was another murder, I was to be called. Marino wasn't keen on the idea. Ever since I was appointed chief medical examiner for the Commonwealth of Virginia less than two years ago he'd been difficult. I wasn't sure if he didn't like women, or if he just didn't like me.

"Berkley's in Berkley Downs, Southside," he said condescendingly. "You know the way?"

Confessing I didn't, I scribbled the directions on the notepad I always kept by the phone. I hung up and my feet were already on the floor as adrenaline hit my nerves like espresso. The house was quiet. I grabbed my black medical bag, scuffed and worn from years of use.

The night air was like a cool sauna, and there were no lights in the windows of my neighbors' houses. As I backed the navy station wagon out of the drive, I looked at the light burning over the porch, at the first-story window leading into the guest bedroom where my ten-year-old niece, Lucy, was asleep. This would be one more day in the child's life I would miss. I had picked her up at the airport Wednesday night. Our meals together, so far, had been few.

There was no traffic until I hit the Parkway. Minutes later I was speeding across the James River. Taillights far ahead were rubies, the downtown skyline ghostly in the rearview mirror. Fanning out on either side were plains of darkness with tiny necklaces of smudged light at the edges. Out there, somewhere, is a man, I thought. He could be anybody, walks upright, sleeps with a roof over his head, and has the usual number of fingers and toes. He is probably white and much younger than my forty years. He is ordinary by most standards, and probably doesn't drive a BMW or grace the bars in the Slip or the finer clothing stores along Main Street.

But, then again, he could. He could be anybody and he was nobody. Mr. Nobody. The kind of guy you don't remember after riding up twenty floors alone with him inside an elevator.

He had become the self-appointed dark ruler of the city, an obsession for thousands of people he had never seen, and an obsession of mine. Mr. Nobody.

Because the homicides began two months ago, he may have been recently released from prison or a mental hospital. This was the speculation last week, but the theories were constantly changing.

Mine had remained the same from the start. I strongly suspected he hadn't been in the city long, he'd done this before somewhere else, and he'd never spent a day behind the locked doors of a prison or a forensic unit. He wasn't disorganized, wasn't an amateur, and he most assuredly wasn't "crazy."

Wilshire was two lights down on the left, Berkley the first right after that.

I could see the blue and red lights flashing two blocks away. The street in front of 5602 Berkley was lit up like a disaster site. An ambulance, its engine rumbling loudly, was alongside two unmarked police units with grille lights flashing and three white cruisers with light bars going full tilt. The Channel 12 news crew had just pulled up. Lights had blinked on up and down the street, and several people in pajamas and housecoats had wandered out to their porches.

I parked behind the news van as a cameraman trotted across the street. Head bent, the collar of my khaki raincoat turned up around my ears, I briskly followed the brick wall to the front door. I have always had a special distaste for seeing myself on the evening news. Since the stranglings in Richmond began, my office had been inundated, the same reporters calling over and over again with the same insensitive questions.

"If it's a serial killer, Dr. Scarpetta, doesn't that indicate it's quite likely to happen again?"

As if they wanted it to happen again.

"Is it true you found bite marks on the last victim, Doc?"

It wasn't true, but no matter how I answered such a question I couldn't win. "No comment," and they assume it's true. "No," and the next edition reads "Dr. Kay Scarpetta denies that bite marks have been found on the victims' bodies..." The killer, who's reading the papers like everybody else, gets a new idea.

Recent news accounts were florid and frighteningly detailed. They went far beyond serving the useful purpose of warning the city's citizens. Women, particularly those who lived alone, were terrified. The sale of handguns and deadbolt locks went up fifty percent the week after the third murder, and the SPCA ran out of dogs—a phenomenon which, of course, made the front page, too. Yesterday, the infamous and prizewinning police reporter Abby Turnbull had demonstrated her usual brass by coming to my office and clubbing my staff with the Freedom of Information Act in an unsuccessful attempt at getting copies of the autopsy records.

Crime reporting was aggressive in Richmond, an old Virginia city of 220,000, which last year was listed by the FBI as having the second-highest homicide rate per capita in the United States. It wasn't uncommon for forensic pathologists from the British Commonwealth to spend a month at my office to learn more about gunshot wounds. It wasn't uncommon for career cops like Pete Marino to leave the madness of New York or Chicago only to find Richmond was worse.

What was uncommon were these sex slayings. The average citizen can't relate to drug and domestic shootouts or one wino stabbing another over a bottle of Mad Dog. But these murdered women were the colleagues you sit next to at work, the friends you invite to go shopping or to stop by for drinks, the acquaintances you chat with at parties, the people you stand in line with at the checkout counter. They were someone's neighbor, someone's sister, someone's daughter, someone's lover. They were in their own homes, sleeping in their own beds, when Mr. Nobody climbed through one of their windows.

Two uniformed men flanked the front door, which was open wide and barred by a yellow ribbon of tape, warning: CRIME SCENE—DO NOT CROSS.

"Doc." He could have been my son, this boy in blue who stepped aside at the top of the steps and lifted the tape to let me duck under.

The living room was immaculate, and attractively decorated in warm rose tones. A handsome cherry cabinet in a corner contained a small television and a compact disc player. Nearby a stand held sheet music and a violin. Beneath a curtained window overlooking the front lawn was a sectional sofa, and on the glass coffee table in front of it were half a dozen magazines neatly stacked. Among them were Scientific American and the New England Journal of Medicine. Across a Chinese dragon rug with a rose medallion against a field of cream stood a walnut bookcase. Tomes straight from a medical school's syllabi lined two shelves.

An open doorway led into a corridor running the length of the house. To my right appeared a series of rooms, to the left was the kitchen, where Marino and a young officer were talking to a man I assumed was the husband.

I was vaguely aware of clean countertops, linoleum and appliances in the off-white that manufacturers call "almond," and the pale yellow of the wallpaper and curtains. But my attention was riveted to the table. On top of it lay a red nylon knapsack, the contents of which had been gone through by the police: a stethoscope, a penlight, a Tupperware container once packed with a meal or a snack, and recent editions of the Annals of Surgery, Lancet and the Journal of Trauma. By now I was thoroughly unsettled.

Marino eyed me coolly as I paused by the table, then introduced me to Matt Petersen, the husband. Petersen was slumped in a chair, his face destroyed by shock. He was exquisitely handsome, almost beautiful, his features flawlessly chiseled, his hair jet-black, his skin smooth and hinting of a tan. He was wide-shouldered with a lean but elegantly sculpted body casually clad in a white Izod shirt and faded blue jeans. His eyes were cast down, his hands stiffly in his lap.

"These are hers?" I had to know. The medical items might belong to the husband.

Marino's "Yeah" was a confirmation.

Petersen's eyes slowly lifted. Deep blue, bloodshot, they seemed relieved as they fixed on me. The doctor had arrived, a ray of hope where there was none.

He muttered in the truncated sentences of a mind fragmented, stunned, "I talked to her on the phone. Last night. She told me she'd be home around twelve-thirty, home from VMC, the ER. I got here, found the lights out, thought she'd already gone to bed. Then I went in there." His voice rose, quivering, and he took a deep breath. "I went in there, in the bedroom." His eyes were desperate and welling, and he was pleading with me. "Please. I don't want people looking at her, seeing her like that. Please."

I gently told him, "She has to be examined, Mr. Petersen."

A fist suddenly banged the top of the table in a startling outburst of rage. "I know!" His eyes were wild. "But all of them, the police and everybody!" His voice was shaking. "I know how it is! Reporters and everybody crawling all over the place. I don't want every son of a bitch and his brother staring at her!"

Marino didn't bat an eye. "Hey. I got a wife, too, Matt. I know where you're coming from, all right? You got my word she gets respect. The same respect I'd want if it was me sitting in your chair, okay?"

The sweet balm of lies.

The dead are defenseless, and the violation of this woman, like the others, had only begun. I knew it would not end until Lori Petersen was turned inside out, every inch of her photographed, and all of it on display for experts, the police, attorneys, judges and members of a jury to see. There would be thoughts, remarks about her physical attributes or lack of them. There would be sophomoric jokes and cynical asides as the victim, not the killer, went on trial, every aspect of her person and the way she lived, scrutinized, judged and, in some instances, degraded.

A violent death is a public event, and it was this facet of my profession that so rudely grated against my sensibilities. I did what I could to preserve the dignity of the victims. But there was little I could do after the person became a case number, a piece of evidence passed from hand to hand. Privacy is destroyed completely as life.

Copyright © 1990 by Patrica Cornwell

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 369 )
Rating Distribution

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(174)

4 Star

(115)

3 Star

(44)

2 Star

(15)

1 Star

(21)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 371 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 9, 2009

    Patricia Cornwell: The Kay Scarpetta series

    I have thoroughly enjoyed reading this series. I started reading in the fall of 2008 and am now re-reading #15 while I wait for #16 to arrive. I recommend it. Start with #1.

    16 out of 17 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 12, 2010

    Terrifying!

    This book was so scary that I kept getting up to check the locks on the doors and windows as I was reading it. I love all the novels in the Kay Scarpetta series but this one just sticks with you. The psychological aspect of the plot; the fact that the killer is attacking women not within the same ethnic race; was very fascinating. I could not figure out who the culprit might be and was shocked and disturbed when it was finally revealed. I read this book twelve years ago and the sense of fear still stays with me. If you like this book, you may also enjoy: the novels of Tess Gerittsen, Tami Hoag (A Thin Dark Line, Ashes to Ashes, Dust to Dust), James Patterson's Kiss the Girls, and the true-crime books of Ann Rule.

    14 out of 15 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 14, 2012

    Very good read

    Full of insiders info and a suspenseful ending. I've found a new series to read.

    6 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 13, 2012

    Still my favorite!

    I read this book for the first time many years ago, but it is still the best murder mystery I have ever read. I pull it out at least once a year to read it over and over again. It is so captivating that I read it straight through everytime.

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 9, 2009

    Can't put it down

    I have read many P. Cornwell books and love the Kay Scarpetta series. I know when I start reading, I need to allow a few days because I won't be able to put the book down. It's always a challenge trying to figure out who the killer is, but I'm never able to figure it out until the end.

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 17, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    THE REAL DISAPPOINTMENT IS THAT I BOUGHT TWO OF THESE SERIES BOOKS

    I DONT EVEN KNOW HOW I FINISH THIS BOOK IT WAS SO BORING ! IM NOT EVEN GOING TO BOTHER AND TRY TO READ THE OTHER ONE ITS GOING STRIAGHT TO THE BOOK EXCHANGE

    4 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 29, 2012

    HELP

    I cannot get this to open, all I get is a blank screen, Help please

    2 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 8, 2011

    Have read it twice!

    Love the Scarpetta series.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 9, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    It was ook

    This book wasn't my absolute favortie or anything, but it had a decent plot and really picked up in the last 200 or so pages. I recommend this book to forensic mystery lovers. It is a series so there is much more to read after this one. The only down this book has is that its very descriptive and can kind of drag a bit. Its not the high action I usually like so much, but all in all a decent book.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 23, 2013

    The book that hooked me on Kay Scarpetta.

    The book that hooked me on Kay Scarpetta.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 13, 2013

    I just started the Scarpetta series book #1and love it . Love re

    I just started the Scarpetta series book #1and love it . Love reading her books and will def reccomend her books to others. Many thanks Patricia for being such an excellent writer. Keep up the good work.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 9, 2012

    Very interesting !

    Read to read the rest of the series

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 5, 2012

    Lotsa characters. Bring your memory!

    Post Mortem, the first of the Scarpetta series, is a good story, but I found it to be complicated by too many characters that really didn't need to be there and too many side-tracks, some of which didn't really contribute to the main story. Nonetheless, it is a good read that will keep your mind working to keep track of it all, and that's not necessarily a bad thing, just a long read.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 14, 2011

    Why+%2410+for+a+book+published+in+1990%3F%3F

    I+like+this+series+and+Patricia+Cornwell+but+give+me+a+break+barnes+and+noble%2C+huh%3F+Ten+bucks+for+a+book+originally+published++TWENTY-ONE+years+ago%3F%3F%3F+This+blatent%2C+greedy+price+gouging+is+disgusting.+Shame+on++you.+%0A

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 29, 2008

    If you like the series Bones... Try this!

    I have seen Patricia's books in the store for many years. I have never had the urge to pick one up. I started watching the series Bones on TV and loved it so I tried reading Kathy Reichs books. While they were good, they were a bit too much like a technical manual for my taste. (very dry) I decided I would try Postmortem to see what I thought. I loved it. It was very well writen, had a good strong plot, and was very enjoyable. I will absolutely continue to read this series.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 25, 2014

    good crime novel, started out a little slow and was a little har

    good crime novel, started out a little slow and was a little hard getting into it but about half way through couldn't put it down

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 22, 2014

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 19, 2014

    Flightpath

    Leaps up.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 16, 2014

    Wavebreak

    She runs in and sees flightpath then makes a sound thats halfroar half screech then in rage gos off t look fr hee.(i never liked mistpaw, and now she is putting coal n the furnace of my tempe. >:O) i am horrible at fixing mistakes...

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 16, 2014

    Rosepetal ooc

    Mistpaw, book! I can't post where we are until more start looking and see it. I already had to type it twice. Also, rp'r to rp'r Mist loves Rose so Rosie won't die by the end except if where she ends up peeps are mean to her. ~Rose &hearts~

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