The Potter's Eye: Art and Tradition in North Carolina Pottery

The Potter's Eye: Art and Tradition in North Carolina Pottery

by Mark Hewitt, Nancy Sweezy, Jason Dowdle
     
 

Potter's Eye: Art and Tradition in North Carolina PotterySee more details below

Overview

Potter's Eye: Art and Tradition in North Carolina Pottery

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"More than an exhibition catalog; it is a collaborative work of art."
Western Folklore

"This exciting work succeeds in its mission to 'signal and celebrate the artistry of North Carolina's greatest production potters,' but this work has accomplished much more—it has challenged and tutored scholars and collectors to view the stoneware of North Carolina with a potter's eye."
Journal of Folklore Research

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780807829929
Publisher:
The University of North Carolina Press
Publication date:
10/31/2005
Edition description:
1
Pages:
296
Product dimensions:
9.40(w) x 11.54(h) x 1.33(d)

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
A lavishly illustrated celebration of [the stoneware pottery] tradition. . . . The Potter's Eye honors the keen focus vernacular potters bring to their materials, tools, techniques, and history. It is an evocative guide for anyone interested in the art of North Carolina pottery and the aesthetic majesty of this resilient and long-standing tradition.—New England Antiques Journal

[Hewitt and Sweezy] are just nutty about North Carolina stoneware: salt- and alkaline-glazed surfaces, poetic shapes, regional clays, Asian influences. [In The Potter's Eye] the language of pottery is a language of love: pots are 'taut-bellied' and 'pregnant,' 'blistered' and 'scarred.' . . . The sensual prose makes it enjoyable and informative. . . . The Potter's Eye does what any good tour guide should do: gently compels you to look and look again, focusing on the nifty details.—Oxford American

Perry and her coterie of authors provide expert introductions to the state's pottery as a whole and to the significant benchmarks of its cultural history. . . . Jason Dowdle created special photography for The Potter's Eye that examines the form and surfaces of each pot in ways not previously expressed in books on ceramics history. This volume is worth owning for its visual beauty alone.—Winterthur Portfolio

More than an exhibition catalog; it is a collaborative work of art.—Western Folklore

Exquisitely illustrated. . . . [with] incredibly detailed surface shots.—Ceramics Monthly

A handsome heavy book, thanks largely to Jason Dowdle's gorgeous photographs. . . . The writing is poetic, persuasive, and at times, almost polemical.—North Carolina Historical Review

I have great respect for Mark Hewitt and Nancy Sweezy. I deeply appreciate what they are doing, and that their writing is based on wide personal experience, profound insight, and wisdom.—Gerry Williams, Studio Potter Organization

This exciting work succeeds in its mission to 'signal and celebrate the artistry of North Carolina's greatest production potters,' but this work has accomplished much more—it has challenged and tutored scholars and collectors to view the stoneware of North Carolina with a potter's eye.—Journal of Folklore Research

Returning to the roots of the North Carolina tradition, The Potter's Eye focuses on the 'classic' pots from nineteenth-century and contemporary potters, adding intriguing historical and aesthetic comparisons to work from Asia, the northeastern United States, and South Carolina. The grouping of pots is original and well thought out. Hewitt develops several themes with particular energy—the use of local materials and wood firing, the influence of Asia, and the power of tradition—all of which are crystallized in Sweezy's superb interviews with the potters themselves.—Charles G. Zug III, author of Turners and Burners: The Folk Potters of North Carolina

[Hewitt's] critical evaluation eloquently makes a link between the very old and the new and in doing so rejuvenates our 'eye' and inspires us to view the work of the North Carolina stoneware tradition in a new light. . . . Hewitt introduces the reader to a new vocabulary of expression and technical insight, a grounding which well prepares and informs our senses for the Nancy Sweezy interviews with six contemporary North Carolina potters who continue to turn and burn. . . .The many powerful, full page, color photographs of the exhibits taken by Jason Dowdle . . . immediately grasp our attention.—The Log Book

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