Pow!

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Overview

In this novel by the 2012 Nobel Laureate in Literature, Mo Yan, a benign old monk listens to a prospective novice?s tale of depravity, violence, and carnivorous excess while a nice little family drama?in which nearly everyone dies?unfurls. But in this tale of sharp hatchets, bad water, and a rusty WWII mortar, we can?t help but laugh. Reminiscent of the novels of dark masters of European absurdism like G?nter Grass, Witold Gombrowicz, or Jakov Lind, Mo Yan?s POW! is a ...

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POW!

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Overview

In this novel by the 2012 Nobel Laureate in Literature, Mo Yan, a benign old monk listens to a prospective novice’s tale of depravity, violence, and carnivorous excess while a nice little family drama—in which nearly everyone dies—unfurls. But in this tale of sharp hatchets, bad water, and a rusty WWII mortar, we can’t help but laugh. Reminiscent of the novels of dark masters of European absurdism like Günter Grass, Witold Gombrowicz, or Jakov Lind, Mo Yan’s POW! is a comic masterpiece.

In this bizarre romp through the Chinese countryside, the author treats us to a cornucopia of cooked animal flesh—ostrich, camel, donkey, dog, as well as the more common varieties. As his dual narratives merge and feather into one another, each informing and illuminating the other, Mo Yan probes the character and lifestyle of modern China. Displaying his many talents, as fabulist, storyteller, scatologist, master of allusion and cliché, and more, POW! carries the reader along quickly, hungrily, and giddily, up until its surprising dénouement.

Mo Yan has been called one of the great novelists of modern Chinese literature and the New York Times Book Review has hailed his work as harsh and gritty, raunchy and funny. He writes big, sometimes mystifying, sometimes infuriating, but always entertaining novels—and POW! is no exception.

 

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Editorial Reviews

The New York Times - Dwight Garner
…a red-toothed fantasia about meat production and meat consumption…It's a multi-angled book, one in which no character or political system emerges unscathed. Mr. Mo, who says he does not consider himself political, is nonetheless an equal-opportunity dispenser of irony and ridicule. Pow! owes a debt, the author notes in an afterword, to Günter Grass's novel The Tin Drum. Like that book this one is a portrait of a boy who, in some ways, refuses to grow up. Yet Pow! is staunchly adult in its concerns. It's a reminder that so much of life and literature is about, as the narrator puts it, "putting a knife in white and taking it out red."
The Washington Post - Steven Moore
On Oct. 11, [2012] the Chinese writer Mo Yan was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature, and two months later his new novel, POW!, demonstrates for Americans why he deserved to win. It's a vibrant, visceral novel that is both personal and political, realistic and surrealistic, funny and shocking. The explosive title cries out—POW!—but it is also a subtle display of narrative wizardry…Mo Yan's POW! is a pyrotechnic display of how to blow up one's personal life to mythic proportions.
New York Times - Dwight Garner

“Mo Yan is a writer who, defiantly in the face of those who wish his work were less cartoonish and more straightforward in its political meanings, continues to sing his own peculiar and alluring song.”
Toronto Star - Jason Beerman

Pow! is a frenzied stew of stinging satire and theatre of the absurd. Readers are free to interpret it as they wish; the truth is in there somewhere.”
Chicago Tribune - Yunte Huang

“There is little doubt that Mo Yan’s novel Pow!—with its Rabelaisian carnivalesque language and surrealist narration—rightly belongs among the best of world literature. . . . Mo's novel in the English version, rendered beautifully and ingeniously by Howard Goldblatt, has acquired a poetic, or rather, onomatopoetic title . . . [and] readers of Pow! are bombarded page after page by the blaring force of a story of carnivorous excess that bares China's soiled bottom.”
Boston Globe - John Freeman

“Like Gabriel Garcia Marquez, whose work Mo Yan has claimed as an inspiration, sometimes the images in Pow! overflow, and the very point of his writing is that abundance. Unlike the magical realists, however, there is a lucid clarity to Mo Yan’s best writing. In this country he is akin to William T. Vollmann, whose books are long and dense with harrowing and acute images.”
Three Percent - Chad Post

“The brilliance of this novel—and the reason it deserves comparisons to so many great authors—is the way in which this tragic story is filtered through the eyes of a twelve-year-old boy. . . . As a result, the story gets pulled and twisted out of shape, and what is ‘real’ becomes a lot less certain—especially when Xiaotong keeps insisting on his story’s veracity.”
Green Apple Books - Stephen Sparks

“Recently enshrined Nobel laureate Mo Yan’s latest novel is a rip-roarin’, gut-bustin’, greasy meal of a book. . . . Pow! is a hilariously slapstick affair, salted with subtle critique of a corrupt government and well-seasoned with sly satire. It’s a resounding confirmation of Mo Yan’s place among the best writers of our time.”
Financial Times - Krys Lee

“Mo, winner of the 2012 Nobel Prize in Literature, was much criticized in the days following the award for his perceived cozy relationship with the Chinese government and reluctance to stand up for freedom of expression. Such judgments, however, are challenged by his bold, outlandish and far from apolitical new novel. Like his earlier works, Pow! defies easy definition. It is national and personal in its concerns, surreal and real, and as comic as it is serious.”
Los Angeles Times - Hector Tobar

“Mo the public figure is careful with words. But Mo the novelist slips past the censors by dressing up his cutting realism in absurd and fantastic clothing. In doing so, he's embracing a long tradition that stretches from Cervantes to the German novelist Günter Grass. . . . Mo’s skill makes POW! a wild, unpredictable ride—a work of demented and subversive genius.”
Quarterly Conversation - Andrea Lingenfelter

“Mo's work is shot through with politics and history, and Pow! is no exception. Translated by the masterful Howard Goldblatt, Pow! adds to the growing list of Mo Yan’s rollicking and ribald novels available in English—all translated by Goldblatt, who has championed Mo Yan’s work for decades and continues to do the author great justice in his earthy and vivid translations.”
Washington Post - Steven Moore

“On October 11, the Chinese writer Mo Yan was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature, and two months later his new novel, Pow!, demonstrates for Americans why he deserved to win. It’s a vibrant, visceral novel that is both personal and political, realistic and surrealistic, funny and shocking. The explosive title cries out —Pow!— but it is also a subtle display of narrative wizardry. . . . Mo Yan’s Pow! is a pyrotechnic display of how to blow up one’s personal life to mythic proportions.”
Seattle Times - Valerie Ryan

“Mo Yan spares the reader nothing. He recounts matters disgusting, ugly, raunchy, repulsive, sexually graphic, ineffably sad, occasionally joy-filled—all of which combine to make a novel larger than life.”
Economist

"Pow! is a Rorschach inkblot of a book, and all the better for not telling the reader what to think. Within the book, meat is everywhere and everything. What that means could be anything."
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780857420763
  • Publisher: Seagull Books
  • Publication date: 12/15/2012
  • Edition description: Translatio
  • Pages: 440
  • Sales rank: 780,024
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Mo Yan has published dozens of short stories and novels in Chinese. His other English-language works include The Garlic BalladsThe Republic of Wine, Shifu: You'll Do Anything for a LaughBig Breasts & Wide Hips, and Life and Death Are Wearing Me Out. Howard Goldblatt is research professor of Chinese at the University of Notre Dame. The founding editor of Modern Chinese Literature, he has contributed essays and articles to the Washington Post, the TimesTimeWorld Literature Today, and the Los Angeles Times, among other publications.

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Table of Contents

Chapters 1–41
Afterword by Mo Yan
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted December 15, 2012

    An amazing kaleidoscope of rural 1990's China undergoing the beg

    An amazing kaleidoscope of rural 1990's China undergoing the beginnings of the explosive growth of the new capitalist China. A  subtle and brilliant critique of government food regulation and free fettered capitalism all through the unique fabulist, hyper-realist and historical lens of Mo Yan who has managed to effectively cover many politically controversial  political topics in a highly literary way. Fully deserving of the Nobel Prize.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 16, 2013

    Amelia

    Sits writing number fats

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