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Power Chord
     

Power Chord

4.0 1
by Ted Staunton
 

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At a Battle of the Bands event, Ace and his best friend Denny notice that girls like musicians, no matter how dorky the dudes might be. Having, so far, been severely challenged when it comes to meeting girls, they decide to start a band. Ace discovers that he loves playing guitar and electric bass. While Denny tweets their every move and their clean-freak drummer, Pig

Overview

At a Battle of the Bands event, Ace and his best friend Denny notice that girls like musicians, no matter how dorky the dudes might be. Having, so far, been severely challenged when it comes to meeting girls, they decide to start a band. Ace discovers that he loves playing guitar and electric bass. While Denny tweets their every move and their clean-freak drummer, Pig, polishes everything in sight, Ace tries to write a song that will win at the next local teen songwriting contest. It's more difficult than he thought it would be. When Denny brings a great tune to rehearsal, Ace is devastated that Denny, who rarely practices, is a better songwriter than he is. The contest is only days away when Ace discovers that Denny stole the song, and Ace has to decide if winning is worth the lie.

Editorial Reviews

The Horn Book Guide
"This quick and straightfoward story...benefits from Staunton's laid-back narrative style."
The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books
"This entry in the Orca Currents series is excellently tuned to its purpose, staying snappy and solid rather than broadening out into needless wackiness...Ultimately, it's a fond and focused tribute to the joy of getting together with pals to make some noise and draw attention...Endearing, approachable, and authentic, this is a triple-threat quick pick."
CM Magazine
"Staunton introduces an authentic voice in Ace...The quick pace, snappy dialogue and music terminology will appeal to reluctant readers. "
VOYA - Mary Ann Harlan
The formula this imprint has for high interest/low reading level books will be recognizable to those who have read other titles in the Currents series. In Living Rough, Poe lives in a tent with his homeless father, keeping the secret so they will not be separated. He has learned how to survive but there are things he has not planned for: the new girl at school, the social studies project on homelessness, the city's growth, and a terrible storm. Like many of the Current books, the story is primarily plot driven, although the character of Poe does present some nuance. Power Chords takes on a lighter topic. Ace is virtually invisible to girls, when his effusive friend Denny suggests they start a band. Ace finds that he really likes the music and being in a band. A songwriting contest pulls Ace deeper into his love of music while presenting a conflict with Denny. Again, the story relies primarily on plot, although hints of his past provide a more nuanced picture of Ace, and as a secondary character Denny is more developed than most. The quality of the books should be viewed through the lens of their intent. The short page count does not allow for fully realized characters, or much of a growth arc. The plots are simple and often one-dimensional (particularly in Power Chords); however, the goal of producing contemporary realistic fiction that will be accessible and of interest to struggling and/or reluctant readers is met. (Orca Currents) Reviewer: Mary Ann Harlan
Children's Literature - Elisabeth Greenberg
This twist on the Boy Meets Girl story may attract reluctant readers with its quick immersion into rock music, bands, guitar-playing, and the junior high mind set: start a band and girls will flock to you. This is Denny's idea, but Ace, his best friend and narrator, is the one who develops a passion for music and realizes that truth may be more important than so-called best friends. His fascination with music and songwriting leads him to a budding love interest, but, more importantly, he realizes that it is important to give credit where credit is due. The book ends on a bittersweet note with the breakup of his original band; Denny moves on to the girls in video club and the drummer Pig admits that he's more interested in flying airplanes. However, Ace and his girl plan a band of their own. For the target reader, it's all about moving on to the next step of life. Reviewer: Elisabeth Greenberg

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781554699032
Publisher:
Orca Book Publishers
Publication date:
10/01/2011
Series:
Orca Currents Series
Pages:
128
Sales rank:
642,255
Product dimensions:
4.20(w) x 6.90(h) x 0.30(d)
Lexile:
HL460L (what's this?)
Age Range:
10 - 14 Years

Read an Excerpt

I have to hear the sound, the real sound. It's time for power.

Meet the Author

Ted Staunton divides his time between writing and a busy schedule as a speaker, workshop leader, storyteller and musical performer for children and adults. Ted lives in Port Hope, Ontario. For more information, visit www.tedstauntonbooks.com.

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Power Chord 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Heidi_G More than 1 year ago
Ace and Denny start a band after noticing that girls go for musicians. Despite the fact that they don't play well, Denny tweets news about the band and even arranges for a video shoot. To drum up interest in the band, the boys enter a local contest with a requirement of playing two original songs. Ace thinks his compositions are pretty good and is startled when Denny shows up with a really great song, one which Ace knows was written by his mom's former boyfriend. Will the band take credit for the song, or will Ace do the right thing and announce the true composer? Another winner from the Orca Currents series of high interest-lo level books for teens.