The Power of Now: A Guide to Spiritual Enlightenment

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Overview


Much more than simple principles and platitudes, The Power of Now takes readers on an inspiring spiritual journey to find their true and deepest self and reach the ultimate in personal growth and spirituality: the discovery of truth and light. In the first chapter, Tolle introduces readers to enlightenment and its natural enemy, the mind. He awakens readers to their role as a creator of pain and shows them how to have a pain-free identity by living fully in the present. The journey is thrilling, and along the ...
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Overview


Much more than simple principles and platitudes, The Power of Now takes readers on an inspiring spiritual journey to find their true and deepest self and reach the ultimate in personal growth and spirituality: the discovery of truth and light. In the first chapter, Tolle introduces readers to enlightenment and its natural enemy, the mind. He awakens readers to their role as a creator of pain and shows them how to have a pain-free identity by living fully in the present. The journey is thrilling, and along the way, the author shows how to connect to the indestructible essence of our Being, "the eternal, ever-present One Life beyond the myriad forms of life that are subject to birth and death." Only after regaining awareness of Being, liberated from Mind and intensely in the Now, is there Enlightenment.
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Editorial Reviews

Common Ground
This is not just another candy-ass elementary level celestine prophetic conversation supposedly with God clone. It is fresh, revealing, current, new inspiration. Power of Now is written from a depth of a person who has considered suicide, gone through his dark night of the soul and has come out the other side into his very personal and ecstatic enlightenment. If you are considering getting back in touch with your soul this book is a great companion.
New Age Books
Now and then, time cultivates these perfect jewels. You find one and think nothing better is possible. Such is The Power of Now. A regular customer at our store, and student of Chi Gong said, "It not only synthesizes everything i've delved into, but it does it so clearly and simply." Many customers report back literally "thrilled" to have come across the book.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781577314806
  • Publisher: New World Library
  • Publication date: 9/21/2004
  • Edition description: First Trade Paper Edition
  • Pages: 235
  • Sales rank: 751
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.40 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author


World-renowned spiritual teacher Eckhart Tolle conveys simple wisdom that transcends any particular religion, doctrine, or guru. His #1 NYT bestselling book is a modern classic in the field of personal growth and spirituality; Oprah Winfrey credits The Power of Now with helping her to "get through September 11, 2001" and she featured it on her December 2002 "Oprah’s Favorite Things" show. A native of Germany, Eckhart Tolle attended the University of London, and upon graduation went on to become a research scholar and supervisor at Cambridge University. At 29, a profound spiritual awakening virtually dissolved his personal identity and sparked a radical change in the course of his life. It marked the beginning of an intense inward journey and he devoted the next decade to understanding, deepening, and integrating that transformation. For the past ten years, he has acted as a counselor and spiritual guide, facilitating sold-out groups in Europe and North America. He lives in Vancouver, British Columbia.

Biography

Eckhart Tolle was born in Germany in 1948. He spent his teenage years living with his father in Spain, then moved in his early 20s to England where he attended the Universities of London and Cambridge. Following a period of intense personal crisis, he underwent a profound spiritual awakening at the age of 29. He embarked on a long, transformative inner journey that effectively dissolved his old identity and changed the course of his life. Today he is recognized as a great spiritual counselor and an author of inspirational self-help guides. He remains unaffiliated with any organized religion or specific philosophical tradition.

In his first book, The Power of Now (1999), Tolle stressed the importance of living, fully present, in the moment. His powerful message of active self-awareness resonated with millions of readers -- including kingmaker Oprah Winfrey -- and launched a range of related literature and teaching materials. In 2008, Winfrey selected another Tolle title, A New Earth, for her influential Book Club, joining the author for an online workshop. A sought-after public speaker, Tolle travels extensively, taking his teachings throughout the world.

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    1. Also Known As:
      Ulrich Leonard Tolle (birth name)
    2. Hometown:
      Vancouver, BC, Canada
    1. Date of Birth:
      February 16, 1948
    2. Place of Birth:
      Lünen, Germany
    1. Education:
      University of London; Cambridge University

Read an Excerpt

The Power of Now


By Eckhart Tolle

New World Library

Copyright © 2001 New World Library All right reserved.
ISBN: 1577311523


Chapter One

YOU ARE NOT YOUR MIND

The Greatest Obstacle to Enlightenment

Enlightenment - what is that?

A beggar had been sitting by the side of a road for over thirty years. One day a stranger walked by. "Spare some change?" mumbled the beggar, mechanically holding out his old baseball cap. "I have nothing to give you," said the stranger. Then he asked: "What's that you are sitting on?" "Nothing," replied the beggar. "Just an old box. I have been sitting on it for as long as I can remember." "Ever looked inside?" asked the stranger. "No," said the beggar. "What's the point? There's nothing in there." "Have a look inside," insisted the stranger. The beggar managed to pry open the lid. With astonishment, disbelief, and elation, he saw that the box was filled with gold.

I am that stranger who has nothing to give you and who is telling you to look inside. Not inside any box, as in the parable, but somewhere even closer: inside yourself.

"But I am not a beggar," I can hear you say.

Those who have not found their true wealth, which is the radiant joy of Being and the deep, unshakable peace that comes with it, are beggars, even if they have great material wealth. They are looking outside for scraps of pleasure or fulfillment, for validation, security, or love, while they havea treasure within that not only includes all those things but is infinitely greater than anything the world can offer.

The word enlightenment conjures up the idea of some super-human accomplishment, and the ego likes to keep it that way, but it is simply your natural state of felt oneness with Being. It is a state of connectedness with something immeasurable and indestructible, something that, almost paradoxically, is essentially you and yet is much greater than you. It is finding your true nature beyond name and form. The inability to feel this connectedness gives rise to the illusion of separation, from yourself and from the world around you. You then perceive yourself, consciously or unconsciously, as an isolated fragment. Fear arises, and conflict within and without becomes the norm.

I love the Buddha's simple definition of enlightenment as "the end of suffering." There is nothing superhuman in that, is there? Of course, as a definition, it is incomplete. It only tells you what enlightenment is not: no suffering. But what's left when there is no more suffering? The Buddha is silent on that, and his silence implies that you'll have to find out for yourself. He uses a negative definition so that the mind cannot make it into something to believe in or into a superhuman accomplishment, a goal that is impossible for you to attain. Despite this precaution, the majority of Buddhists still believe that enlightenment is for the Buddha, not for them, at least not in this lifetime.

You used the word Being. Can you explain what you mean by that?

Being is the eternal, ever-present One Life beyond the myriad forms of life that are subject to birth and death. However, Being is not only beyond but also deep within every form as its innermost invisible and indestructible essence. This means that it is accessible to you now as your own deepest self, your true nature. But don't seek to grasp it with your mind. Don't try to understand it. You can know it only when the mind is still. When you are present, when your attention is fully and intensely in the Now, Being can be felt, but it can never be understood mentally. To regain awareness of Being and to abide in that state of "feeling-realization" is enlightenment.

When you say Being, are you talking about God? If you are, then why don't you say it?

The word God has become empty of meaning through thousands of years of misuse. I use it sometimes, but I do so sparingly. By misuse, I mean that people who have never even glimpsed the realm of the sacred, the infinite vastness behind that word, use it with great conviction, as if they knew what they are talking about. Or they argue against it, as if they knew what it is that they are denying. This misuse gives rise to absurd beliefs, assertions, and egoic delusions, such as "My or our God is the only true God, and your God is false," or Nietzsche's famous statement "God is dead."

The word God has become a closed concept. The moment the word is uttered, a mental image is created, no longer, perhaps, of an old man with a white beard, but still a mental representation of someone or something outside you, and, yes, almost inevitably a male someone or something.

Neither God nor Being nor any other word can define or explain the ineffable reality behind the word, so the only important question is whether the word is a help or a hindrance in enabling you to experience That toward which it points. Does it point beyond itself to that transcendental reality, or does it lend itself too easily to becoming no more than an idea in your head that you believe in, a mental idol?

The word Being explains nothing, but nor does God. Being, however, has the advantage that it is an open concept. It does not reduce the infinite invisible to a finite entity. It is impossible to form a mental image of it. Nobody can claim exclusive possession of Being. It is your very essence, and it is immediately accessible to you as the feeling of your own presence, the realization I am that is prior to I am this or I am that. So it is only a small step from the word Being to the experience of Being.

What is the greatest obstacle to experiencing this reality?

Identification with your mind, which causes thought to become compulsive. Not to be able to stop thinking is a dreadful affliction, but we don't realize this because almost everybody is suffering from it, so it is considered normal. This incessant mental noise prevents you from finding that realm of inner stillness that is inseparable from Being. It also creates a false mind-made self that casts a shadow of fear and suffering. We will look at all that in more detail later.

The philosopher Descartes believed that he had found the most fundamental truth when he made his famous statement: "I think, therefore I am." He had, in fact, given expression to the most basic error: to equate thinking with Being and identity with thinking. The compulsive thinker, which means almost everyone, lives in a state of apparent separateness, in an insanely complex world of continuous problems and conflict, a world that reflects the ever-increasing fragmentation of the mind. Enlightenment is a state of wholeness, of being "at one" and therefore at peace. At one with life in its manifested aspect, the world, as well as with your deepest self and life unmanifested - at one with Being. Enlightenment is not only the end of suffering and of continuous conflict within and without, but also the end of the dreadful enslavement to incessant thinking. What an incredible liberation this is!

Identification with your mind creates an opaque screen of concepts, labels, images, words, judgments, and definitions that blocks all true relationship. It comes between you and yourself, between you and your fellow man and woman, between you and nature, between you and God. It is this screen of thought that creates the illusion of separateness, the illusion that there is you and a totally separate "other." You then forget the essential fact that, underneath the level of physical appearances and separate forms, you are one with all that is. By "forget," I mean that you can no longer feel this oneness as self-evident reality. You may believe it to be true, but you no longer know it to be true. A belief may be comforting. Only through your own experience, however, does it become liberating.

Thinking has become a disease. Disease happens when things get out of balance. For example, there is nothing wrong with cells dividing and multiplying in the body, but when this process continues in disregard of the total organism, cells proliferate and we have disease.

Note: The mind is a superb instrument if used rightly. Used wrongly, however, it becomes very destructive. To put it more accurately, it is not so much that you use your mind wrongly - you usually don't use it at all. It uses you. This is the disease. You believe that you are your mind. This is the delusion. The instrument has taken you over.

I don't quite agree. It is true that I do a lot of aimless thinking, like most people, but I can still choose to use my mind to get and accomplish things, and I do that all the time.

Just because you can solve a crossword puzzle or build an atom bomb doesn't mean that you use your mind. Just as dogs love to chew bones, the mind loves to get its teeth into problems. That's why it does crossword puzzles and builds atom bombs. You have no interest in either. Let me ask you this: can you be free of your mind whenever you want to? Have you found the "off" button?

You mean stop thinking altogether? No, I can't, except maybe for a moment or two.

Then the mind is using you. You are unconsciously identified with it, so you don't even know that you are its slave. It's almost as if you were possessed without knowing it, and so you take the possessing entity to be yourself. The beginning of freedom is the realization that you are not the possessing entity - the thinker. Knowing this enables you to observe the entity. The moment you start watching the thinker, a higher level of consciousness becomes activated. You then begin to realize that there is a vast realm of intelligence beyond thought, that thought is only a tiny aspect of that intelligence. You also realize that all the things that truly matter - beauty, love, creativity, joy, inner peace - arise from beyond the mind. You begin to awaken,freeing yourself from your mind

What exactly do you mean by "watching the thinker"?

When someone goes to the doctor and says, "I hear a voice in my head," he or she will most likely be sent to a psychiatrist. The fact is that, in a very similar way, virtually everyone hears a voice, or several voices, in their head all the time: the involuntary thought processes that you don't realize you have the power to stop. Continuous monologues or dialogues.

You have probably come across "mad" people in the street incessantly talking or muttering to themselves. Well, that's not much different from what you and all other "normal" people do, except that you don't do it out loud. The voice comments, speculates, judges, compares, complains, likes, dislikes, and so on. The voice isn't necessarily relevant to the situation you find yourself in at the time; it may be reviving the recent or distant past or rehearsing or imagining possible future situations. Here it often imagines things going wrong and negative outcomes; this is called worry. Sometimes this soundtrack is accompanied by visual images or "mental movies." Even if the voice is relevant to the situation at hand, it will interpret it in terms of the past. This is because the voice belongs to your conditioned mind, which is the result of all your past history as well as of the collective cultural mind-set you inherited. So you see and judge the present through the eyes of the past and get a totally distorted view of it. It is not uncommon for the voice to be a person's own worst enemy. Many people live with a tormentor in their head that continuously attacks and punishes them and drains them of vital energy. It is the cause of untold misery and unhappiness, as well as of disease.

The good news is that you can free yourself from your mind. This is the only true liberation. You can take the first step right now. Start listening to the voice in your head as often as you can. Pay particular attention to any repetitive thought patterns, those old gramophone records that have been playing in your head perhaps for many years. This is what I mean by "watching the thinker," which is another way of saying: listen to the voice in your head, be there as the witnessing presence.

When you listen to that voice, listen to it impartially. That is to say, do not judge. Do not judge or condemn what you hear, for doing so would mean that the same voice has come in again through the back door. You'll soon realize: there is the voice, and here I am listening to it, watching it. This I am realization, this sense of your own presence, is not a thought. It arises from beyond the mind.

So when you listen to a thought, you are aware not only of the thought but also of yourself as the witness of the thought. A new dimension of consciousness has come in. As you listen to the thought, you feel a conscious presence - your deeper self - behind or underneath the thought, as it were. The thought then loses its power over you and quickly subsides, because you are no longer energizing the mind through identification with it. This is the beginning of the end of involuntary and compulsive thinking.When a thought subsides, you experience a discontinuity in the mental stream - a gap of "no-mind." At first, the gaps will be short, a few seconds perhaps, but gradually they will become longer. When these gaps occur, you feel a certain stillness and peace inside you. This is the beginning of your natural state of felt oneness with Being, which is usually obscured by the mind. With practice, the sense of stillness and peace will deepen. In fact, there is no end to its depth. You will also feel a subtle emanation of joy arising from deep within: the joy of Being.

It is not a trancelike state. Not at all. There is no loss of consciousness here. The opposite is the case. If the price of peace were a lowering of your consciousness, and the price of stillness a lack of vitality and alertness, then they would not be worth having. In this state of inner connectedness, you are much more alert, more awake than in the mind-identified state. You are fully present. It also raises the vibrational frequency of the energy field that gives life to the physical body.

As you go more deeply into this realm of no-mind, as it is sometimes called in the East, you realize the state of pure consciousness. In that state, you feel your own presence with such intensity and such joy that all thinking, all emotions, your physical body, as well as the whole external world become relatively insignificant in comparison to it. And yet this is not a selfish but a selfless state. It takes you beyond what you previously thought of as "your self." That presence is essentially you and at the same time inconceivably greater than you. What I am trying to convey here may sound paradoxical or even contradictory, but there is no other way that I can express it.

Instead of "watching the thinker," you can also create a gap in the mind stream simply by directing the focus of your attention into the Now. Just become intensely conscious of the present moment. This is a deeply satisfying thing to do. In this way, you draw consciousness away from mind activity and create a gap of no-mind in which you are highly alert and aware but not thinking. This is the essence of meditation. In your everyday life, you can practice this by taking any routine activity that normally is only a means to an end and giving it your fullest attention, so that it becomes an end in itself. For example, every time you walk up and down the stairs in your house or place of work, pay close attention to every step, every movement, even your breathing. Be totally present. Or when you wash your hands, pay attention to all the sense perceptions associated with the activity: the sound and feel of the water, the movement of your hands, the scent of the soap, and so on. Or when you get into your car, after you close the door, pause for a few seconds and observe the flow of your breath. Become aware of a silent but powerful sense of presence. There is one certain criterion by which you can measure your success in this practice: the degree of peace that you feel within.

So the single most vital step on your journey toward enlightenment is this: learn to disidentify from your mind. Every time you create a gap in the stream of mind, the light of your consciousness grows stronger. One day you may catch yourself smiling at the voice in your head, as you would smile at the antics of a child. This means that you no longer take the content of your mind all that seriously, as your sense of self does not depend on it.

Enlightenment: Rising above Thought

Isn't thinking essential in order to survive in this world?

Your mind is an instrument, a tool. It is there to be used for a specific task, and when the task is completed, you lay it down. As it is, I would say about 80 to 90 percent of most people's thinking is not only repetitive and useless, but because of its dysfunctional and often negative nature, much of it is also harmful. Observe your mind and you will find this to be true. It causes a serious leakage of vital energy.

This kind of compulsive thinking is actually an addiction. What characterizes an addiction? Quite simply this: you no longer feel that you have the choice to stop. It seems stronger than you. It also gives you a false sense of pleasure, pleasure that invariably turns into pain.

Why should we be addicted to thinking?

Because you are identified with it, which means that you derive your sense of self from the content and activity of your mind.

Because you believe that you would cease to be if you stopped thinking. As you grow up, you form a mental image of who you are, based on your personal and cultural conditioning. We may call this phantom self the ego. It consists of mind activity and can only be kept going through constant thinking. The term ego means different things to different people, but when I use it here it means a false self, created by unconscious identification with the mind.

To the ego, the present moment hardly exists. Only past and future are considered important. This total reversal of the truth accounts for the fact that in the ego mode the mind is so dysfunctional. It is always concerned with keeping the past alive, because without it - who are you? It constantly projects itself into the future to ensure its continued survival and to seek some kind of release or fulfillment there. It says: "One day, when this, that, or the other happens, I am going to be okay, happy, at peace." Even when the ego seems to be concerned with the present, it is not the present that it sees: It misperceives it completely because it looks at it through the eyes of the past. Or it reduces the present to a means to an end, an end that always lies in the mind-projected future. Observe your mind and you'll see that this is how it works.

The present moment holds the key to liberation. But you cannot find the present moment as long as you are your mind.

I don't want to lose my ability to analyze and discriminate. I wouldn't mind learning to think more clearly, in a more focused way, but I don't want to lose my mind. The gift of thought is the most precious thing we have. Without it, we would just be another species of animal.

The predominance of mind is no more than a stage in the evolution of consciousness. We need to go on to the next stage now as a matter of urgency; otherwise, we will be destroyed by the mind, which has grown into a monster. I will talk about this in more detail later. Thinking and consciousness are not synonymous. Thinking is only a small aspect of consciousness. Thought cannot exist without consciousness, but consciousness does not need thought.

Enlightenment means rising above thought, not falling back to a level below thought, the level of an animal or a plant. In the enlightened state, you still use your thinking mind when needed, but in a much more focused and effective way than before. You use it mostly for practical purposes, but you are free of the involuntary internal dialogue, and there is inner stillness. When you do use your mind, and particularly when a creative solution is needed, you oscillate every few minutes or so between thought and stillness, between mind and no-mind. No-mind is consciousness without thought. Only in that way is it possible to think creatively, because only in that way does thought have any real power. Thought alone, when it is no longer connected with the much vaster realm of consciousness, quickly becomes barren, insane, destructive.

The mind is essentially a survival machine. Attack and defense against other minds, gathering, storing, and analyzing information - this is what it is good at, but it is not at all creative. All true artists, whether they know it or not, create from a place of no-mind, from inner stillness. The mind then gives form to the creative impulse or insight. Even the great scientists have reported that their creative breakthroughs came at a time of mental quietude. The surprising result of a nation-wide inquiry among America's most eminent mathematicians, including Einstein, to find out their working methods, was that thinking "plays only a subordinate part in the brief, decisive phase of the creative act itself."1 So I would say that the simple reason why the majority of scientists are not creative is not because they don't know how to think but because they don't know how to stop thinking!

It wasn't through the mind, through thinking, that the miracle that is life on earth or your body were created and are being sustained. There is clearly an intelligence at work that is far greater than the mind. How can a single human cell measuring 1/1,000 of an inch across contain instructions within its DNA that would fill 1,000 books of 600 pages each? The more we learn about the workings of the body, the more we realize just how vast is the intelligence at work within it and how little we know. When the mind reconnects with that, it becomes a most wonderful tool. It then serves something greater than itself.

Emotion: The Body's Reaction to Your Mind

What about emotions? I get caught up in my emotions more than I do in my mind.

Mind, in the way I use the word, is not just thought. It includes your emotions as well as all unconscious mental-emotional reactive patterns. Emotion arises at the place where mind and body meet. It is the body's reaction to your mind - or you might say, a reflection of your mind in the body. For example, an attack thought or a hostile thought will create a build-up of energy in the body that we call anger. The body is getting ready to fight. The thought that you are being threatened, physically or psychologically, causes the body to contract, and this is the physical side of what we call fear. Research has shown that strong emotions even cause changes in the biochemistry of the body. These biochemical changes represent the physical or material aspect of the emotion. Of course, you are not usually conscious of all your thought patterns, and it is often only through watching your emotions that you can bring them into awareness.

The more you are identified with your thinking, your likes and dislikes, judgments and interpretations, which is to say the less present you are as the watching consciousness, the stronger the emotional energy charge will be, whether you are aware of it or not. If you cannot feel your emotions, if you are cut off from them, you will eventually experience them on a purely physical level, as a physical problem or symptom. A great deal has been written about this in recent years, so we don't need to go into it here. A strong unconscious emotional pattern may even manifest as an external event that appears to just happen to you. For example, I have observed that people who carry a lot of anger inside without being aware of it and without expressing it are more likely to be attacked, verbally or even physically, by other angry people, and often for no apparent reason. They have a strong emanation of anger that certain people pick up subliminally and that triggers their own latent anger.

If you have difficulty feeling your emotions, start by focusing attention on the inner energy field of your body. Feel the body from within. This will also put you in touch with your emotions. We will explore this in more detail later.

You say that an emotion is the mind's reflection in the body. But sometimes there is a conflict between the two: the mind says "no" while the emotion says "yes," or the other way around.

If you really want to know your mind, the body will always give you a truthful reflection, so look at the emotion or rather feel it in your body. If there is an apparent conflict between them, the thought will be the lie, the emotion will be the truth. Not the ultimate truth of who you are, but the relative truth of your state of mind at that time.

Conflict between surface thoughts and unconscious mental processes is certainly common. You may not yet be able to bring your unconscious mind activity into awareness as thoughts, but it will always be reflected in the body as an emotion, and of this you can become aware. To watch an emotion in this way is basically the same as listening to or watching a thought, which I described earlier. The only difference is that, while a thought is in your head, an emotion has a strong physical component and so is primarily felt in the body. You can then allow the emotion to be there without being controlled by it. You no longer are the emotion; you are the watcher, the observing presence. If you practice this, all that is unconscious in you will be brought into the light of consciousness.

So observing our emotions is as important as observing our thoughts?

Yes. Make it a habit to ask yourself: What's going on inside me at this moment? That question will point you in the right direction. But don't analyze, just watch. Focus your attention within. Feel the energy of the emotion. If there is no emotion present, take your attention more deeply into the inner energy field of your body. It is the doorway into Being.

An emotion usually represents an amplified and energized thought pattern, and because of its often overpowering energetic charge, it is not easy initially to stay present enough to be able to watch it. It wants to take you over, and it usually succeeds - unless there is enough presence in you. If you are pulled into unconscious identification with the emotion through lack of presence, which is normal, the emotion temporarily becomes "you." Often a vicious circle builds up between your thinking and the emotion: they feed each other. The thought pattern creates a magnified reflection of itself in the form of an emotion, and the vibrational frequency of the emotion keeps feeding the original thought pattern. By dwelling mentally on the situation, event, or person that is the perceived cause of the emotion, the thought feeds energy to the emotion, which in turn energizes the thought pattern, and so on. Basically, all emotions are modifications of one primordial, undifferentiated emotion that has its origin in the loss of awareness of who you are beyond name and form. Because of its undifferentiated nature, it is hard to find a name that precisely describes this emotion. "Fear" comes close, but apart from a continuous sense of threat, it also includes a deep sense of abandonment and incompleteness. It may be best to use a term that is as undifferentiated as that basic emotion and simply call it "pain." One of the main tasks of the mind is to fight or remove that emotional pain, which is one of the reasons for its incessant activity, but all it can ever achieve is to cover it up temporarily. In fact, the harder the mind struggles to get rid of the pain, the greater the pain. The mind can never find the solution, nor can it afford to allow you to find the solution, because it is itself an intrinsic part of the "problem." Imagine a chief of police trying to find an arsonist when the arsonist is the chief of police. You will not be free of that pain until you cease to derive your sense of self from identification with the mind, which is to say from ego. The mind is then toppled from its place of power and Being reveals itself as your true nature. Yes, I know what you are going to ask.

I was going to ask: What about positive emotions such as love and joy?

They are inseparable from your natural state of inner connectedness with Being. Glimpses of love and joy or brief moments of deep peace are possible whenever a gap occurs in the stream of thought. For most people, such gaps happen rarely and only accidentally, in moments when the mind is rendered "speechless," sometimes triggered by great beauty, extreme physical exertion, or even great danger. Suddenly, there is inner stillness. And within that stillness there is a subtle but intense joy, there is love, there is peace.

Usually, such moments are short-lived, as the mind quickly resumes its noise-making activity that we call thinking. Love, joy, and peace cannot flourish until you have freed yourself from mind dominance. But they are not what I would call emotions. They lie beyond the emotions, on a much deeper level. So you need to become fully conscious of your emotions and be able to feel them before you can feel that which lies beyond them. Emotion literally means "disturbance." The word comes from the Latin emovere, meaning "to disturb."

Love, joy, and peace are deep states of Being or rather three aspects of the state of inner connectedness with Being. As such, they have no opposite. This is because they arise from beyond the mind. Emotions, on the other hand, being part of the dualistic mind, are subject to the law of opposites. This simply means that you cannot have good without bad. So in the unenlightened, mind-identified condition, what is sometimes wrongly called joy is the usually short-lived pleasure side of the continuously alternating pain/pleasure cycle. Pleasure is always derived from something outside you, whereas joy arises from within. The very thing that gives you pleasure today will give you pain tomorrow, or it will leave you, so its absence will give you pain. And what is often referred to as love may be pleasurable and exciting for a while, but it is an addictive clinging, an extremely needy condition that can turn into its opposite at the flick of a switch. Many "love" relationships, after the initial euphoria has passed, actually oscillate between "love" and hate, attraction and attack.

Real love doesn't make you suffer. How could it? It doesn't suddenly turn into hate, nor does real joy turn into pain. As I said, even before you are enlightened - before you have freed yourself from your mind - you may get glimpses of true joy, true love, or of a deep inner peace, still but vibrantly alive. These are aspects of your true nature, which is usually obscured by the mind. Even within a "normal" addictive relationship, there can be moments when the presence of something more genuine, something incorruptible, can be felt. But they will only be glimpses, soon to be covered up again through mind interference. It may then seem that you had something very precious and lost it, or your mind may convince you that it was all an illusion anyway. The truth is that it wasn't an illusion, and you cannot lose it. It is part of your natural state, which can be obscured but can never be destroyed by the mind. Even when the sky is heavily overcast, the sun hasn't disappeared. It's still there on the other side of the clouds.

The Buddha says that pain or suffering arises through desire or craving and that to be free of pain we need to cut the bonds of desire.

All cravings are the mind seeking salvation or fulfillment in external things and in the future as a substitute for the joy of Being. As long as I am my mind, I am those cravings, those needs, wants, attachments, and aversions, and apart from them there is no "I" except as a mere possibility, an unfulfilled potential, a seed that has not yet sprouted. In that state, even my desire to become free or enlightened is just another craving for fulfillment or completion in the future. So don't seek to become free of desire or "achieve" enlightenment. Become present. Be there as the observer of the mind. Instead of quoting the Buddha, be the Buddha, be "the awakened one," which is what the word buddha means.

Humans have been in the grip of pain for eons, ever since they fell from the state of grace, entered the realm of time and mind, and lost awareness of Being. At that point, they started to perceive themselves as meaningless fragments in an alien universe, unconnected to the Source and to each other.

Pain is inevitable as long as you are identified with your mind, which is to say as long as you are unconscious, spiritually speaking. I am talking here primarily of emotional pain, which is also the main cause of physical pain and physical disease. Resentment, hatred, self-pity, guilt, anger, depression, jealousy, and so on, even the slightest irritation, are all forms of pain. And every pleasure or emotional high contains within itself the seed of pain: its inseparable opposite, which will manifest in time.

Anybody who has ever taken drugs to get "high" will know that the high eventually turns into a low, that the pleasure turns into some form of pain. Many people also know from their own experience how easily and quickly an intimate relationship can turn from a source of pleasure to a source of pain. Seen from a higher perspective, both the negative and the positive polarities are faces of the same coin, are both part of the underlying pain that is inseparable from the mind-identified egoic state of consciousness.

There are two levels to your pain: the pain that you create now, and the pain from the past that still lives on in your mind and body. Ceasing to create pain in the present and dissolving past pain - this is what I want to talk about now.


Excerpted from The Power of Now by Eckhart Tolle Copyright © 2001 by New World Library Excerpted by permission. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 490 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 5, 2008

    I Also Recommend:

    Here and Now

    After reading happiness books like "Finding Happiness in a Frustrating World", I felt like I had a good handle on what science had uncovered about how to live a happy life and have to say that I am MUCH happier for having read them. But, while the field of positive psychology has made some great contributions to my happiness levels, it's books like "The Power of Now" that come along and let you know there's STILL more you can learn. <BR/><BR/>A key concept of the book (if I'm explaining it right) is that you will start to experience a certain kind of enlightenment when you learn to leave your analytical mind behind. In other words, instead of "thinking" try just "observing your thinking." And when you do this, you also need to realize that all this "thinking noise" that goes on in your head all day long is not really who you are- an enlightening concept indeed! <BR/><BR/>To that end, the book is set up in a question and answer format to help you get to understand these kinds of concepts. While it might seem ridiculous to some, it really isn't. Case in point, we all talk to ourselves or have witnessed others talking to themselves at times (maybe during a sporting event perhaps). If you ask someone who they are talking to, they will usually say "I'm talking to myself." And this, by definition, means that there have to be two "selves", an "I" talking to "myself"- and so justifies the idea of two selves (a "you" and a "thinking you" in the book). <BR/><BR/>Well, if these seem to be the kind of concepts you're ready to explore, this is your book. It raises some good questions and certainly brings up one that you can't argue with: all we have is the here and now. As the book so astutely points out, "Nothing ever happened in the past; it happened in the Now. Nothing ever happened in the future, it will happen in the Now." And learning to live in the now IS the point of the whole book.

    26 out of 27 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 10, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Is Everything Okay This Fifteen Seconds?

    I wrote "Love From Both Sides," and I thank Tolle and his "The Power of Now" in it because he helped me through an extremely challenging time. My husband died, leaving me $180,000 in debt, no insurance, no retirement, no savings. Nothing. I didn't have a job, and I was 55. But because I read Tolle's book, and kept asking myself the kind of questions he suggests, I made it through a dark time and lived to write a book about it. I'm now a working hypnotherapist, and to help my clients stay centered and calm, I use Tolle's suggestions and always recommend his books. Whatever you can read to calm yourself down these days, and create happiness in your heart not only helps you, but all whom you love. That's what the new scientific research proves.

    24 out of 26 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 13, 2008

    Inspirational

    This book is amazing.It is truly moving and thought-provoking.What is absolutely fabulous about it though, is that it talks about every religion and their beliefs and values. So for those skeptics out there,or bashers of Christianity,calm down! It's not all about that.This book just seeks to help relieve stress, find what is truly important,silence the voice in your head that is constantly nagging you and just help you live a better life.It has certainly helped me be able to get over disappointments and stress much faster and easier.Now every little thing in life is truly amazing for what it is.It helped me let go of the ego and just be.'Ego' is also Latin for 'I,' funnily enough.But it is a false I,and we must not concern ourselves with this imposter.My life has vastly improved and there is much need for that,especially in the times during which we are living. The world is in bad need of a reality check.I highly recommend this book, but when reading it please keep an open mind and let Tolle take you on an amazing journey,and really do the meditations, just sit, think,calm down and let revelation wash over you.It is a truly amazing feeling, this liberation.

    13 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 26, 2009

    Zen with blather

    My therapist recommended the audio version of this book. I listened to the CDs and found the first three to be inspiring and helpful. Most certainly, dwelling in the moment is to appreciate and live life. Wasting time in anger, pain, a drug haze, or fantasy is destructive and only compounds the pain. This is one of the fundamental teachings of Zen and is very well expounded by Thich Nhat Hanh in "The Miracle of Mindfulness", and by Dennis Genpo Merzel in his writings and talks. My therapist put it something like this: Most of the time, our thoughts and constant ruminations are junk. Our mind is occupied with reliving painful events, fantasizing about how we should have reacted, fantasizing about how we are going to handle some anticipated event, even being angry about things that haven't happened yet. If we can learn to let go of all that, dwell in the moment, and focus our mind on what we are doing now we are much more productive, happier, and we can appreciate our lives.

    By reinforcing this, the CD set was helpful. However, I found Mr. Tolle's diversion into completely unproven theory and psychology to be distracting and sometimes laughable. As a person making who makes his living with technology, I found his explanations of human behavior and instinct as the result of interaction between positive and negative energy fields absurd. He offers no evidence for such tripe. Indeed, when a questioner asked whether he had any scientific evidence for the statement that one's molecular density decreases when practicing mindfulness, his reply was "Try it and you will become the evidence." This answer indicates that there is no evidence and caused me to doubt that Mr. Tolle even knows what scientific evidence is.

    I also found his re-interpretations of cherry-picked phrases from various religious texts to reinforce his points tiresome. I doubt that many Islamic or Biblical scholars would agree with his interpretations, and he again gives no other evidence for his view. He pontificates without giving logical justification for his statements.

    A colleague suggested that these "energy fields" and "pain bodies" might serve as intellectual aids to the audience. I have to dismiss this idea. People are smart enough to grasp the ideas in the book without such absurd inventions.

    What the CD set did for me was give me motivation to begin practicing meditation again. I thank Mr. Tolle for that.

    9 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 23, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Effectively life changing and motivating for beginners

    When we read religious or spritual books they are generally loaded with jargon of difficult to understand words that only an advanced student of the subject can follow. What does an ordinary beginner understand by the words or phrases like say 'consciousness', ' I am that' etc. She/He finds that such reading material is a good sleeping pill. In "The Power of Now" Echhart Tolle has simplified all this jargon. He speaks in a modern and simple language that can be understood by all. One can easily practise what he has lucidly explained in the book. While all ancient scriptures are, indeed, the source of all the spirituality, to make it understandable is a momentous task which Echhart Tolle has very effectively done.
    The book is in Question & Answer form. This will help a beginner to take maximum benifit from the book. I salute Echhart Tolle for giving such a classic book.

    9 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 6, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Muddy and Condescending

    This book was recommended by an acquaintance as being very enlightening. What I awakened to about a third of the way in was the lack of organization, clarity of thought, and utter annoyance at being talked down to. I count this among the poorest pieces on the subject of awareness that I have read in many years and can't really recommend it on any grounds. Better to read D. T. Suzuki or even a book like "Illusions" by Bach.

    8 out of 19 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 25, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    This audiobook is the best resource for spirituality -aside from spending a month in an ashram

    I became aquainted with Eckhart Tolle when I participated in Oprah's series on A New Earth. I purchased the paperback book and studied it along with 100,000 others around the world. A year later I borrowed the audiobook - A New Earth- from the public library and devoured the content again. I was impressed with Tolle's humility and he seemed to have the peace that I was seeking. I remember Oprah saying that she chose to read A New Earth because she had spend hours reading and re-reading The Power of Now - Tolle's earlier book. I have now borrowed The Power of Now - audiobook version-read by the author - so many times from the public library and renewed it each time - that I thought it was time to purchase my own copy. This book opens the NOW to me every time I listen and makes me feel that I have stepped into a peaceful ashram with Eckhart Tolle as the presiding spiritual leasder.
    The question and answer format is very helpful even with repeated listening. The questions are exactly those I would pose. And the no-nonsense answers quiet my ambitious mind which is constantly trying to "figure it all out". Then I am able to slip into "the now" whenever I choose. I can see that making "the NOW" my home base is essential and Eckhart Tolle effectively teaches us how and why to "hang out" in the present.

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 1, 2004

    THIS BOOK TRANSCENDS THE PAPER IT IS WRITTEN ON!

    I don't care who you are or who you think you are . . . you need to read this book! Everyone I know who has read this book is now BEAMING with energy for life as well as myself. It is infectious and you start to realize that negativity in every aspect of your life and those around you simply fades away. Incredibly powerful, life changing book. There are way too freeking many 5 star ratings on this page to sit on what you've just read! -Andrew

    6 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 1, 2010

    Excellent and life altering

    Words cannot begin to describe the life altering change that this book causes in one's life. Spectacular!

    5 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 17, 2008

    I Also Recommend:

    NOW I get it!

    It's the simplest thing in the world, and that's why it seems so difficult. How ironic! Eckhart Tolle's The Power of NOW is the best book I've ever read. It's the only book that made a positive difference in my"self" and my life situation. After so many years of suffering, I found peace and joy. My pain-body is practically gone - in fact, all pain is practically gone from my body and my life. The chapter on surrender contains the most powerful words I've ever read. Thank goodness I practiced Tolle's advice when I was on the edge of disaster. The positive result felt like a true miracle. This book is miraculous - a life changing, even life saving, book!

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 27, 2011

    It's OK

    Bless his heart but Mr. Toile has never been in a hectic household with a spouse, kids, stepkids, animals, STRESSFUL JOB etc. His books are great if you live on a mountain top or you're by yourself. There needs to be a book called THE POWER OF NOW FOR REAL LIFE.

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 26, 2010

    Reading it for the 2nd time

    This book is phenominal for those looking for true change and personal liberty. Using non-biased, non-denominatinal footings for the foundation of this book, Tolle clarifies what we already know deep within. This book is enlightening and liberatng. I myself struggle with pain of the past and anxieties of future unknowns. "The Power of Now" has shown me how to heal from the past, embrace the future while enjoying and loving every moment that I experience right now. Tolle has taught me the true powers of resistance and acceptance. Life is what it is and I must decide what I will make of my life.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 22, 2010

    Interesting

    This is a great book for quieting the mind of unnecessary past or future thoughts. Some points are extreme and outrageous but for the most part it is a great book. Can be used to get rid of anxiety, worry, paranoia, depression, anger, and more.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 2, 2009

    fantastic!

    life changing!

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 2, 2008

    Epiphanies

    Although this was a very hard read for me I intend to read it several more times hopefully grasping concepts I missed the first time through. I've had one epiphany after another reading this book. This is not a book you can read at one sitting. I found I had to put it down often because my brain was sore, but always picked it up when I wanted to feel peaceful. I recommend this book to anyone willing to put in the time and effort required.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 1, 2008

    He's right

    I already knew everything in this book, but because of that it is an awesome reminder. As a practitioner of Zen I have read many Zen books, and I can say that this book is closer to Zen than any Zen book I have yet read. Tolle provides information in which I had to discover on my own such as the energy body felt through the physical body -which is not mysticism BTW. On top of that there are so much more he gives mention to that I stumble upon on my own - facts I failed to find anywhere else.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 5, 2008

    A LIfe Changing Read

    As someone who has read many self-help books and taken a very long journey down the road of self-discovery / inner peace....I have to say that this book resonated immensely with me. I had so many moments of complete understanding and realization. It just spoke to everything I have experienced and struggled to understand about myself, my background, my behavior, reactions etc. I was blown away.....there was a powerful perspective I had never been able to fully grasp before. Those moments of clarity in my life that I rarely had? Those moments of peace were a higher consciousness breaking through....an awareness connected but separate from the idea of self (the mind) Perhaps this book will not resonated with everyone. As someone who has struggled and fallen victim to his own negative thoughts and suffered immensely as a result....it brought it all together for me. Made sense out of the madness. How the mind can feed on itself and create misery and suffering. For people like me this understanding of self as NOT SELF....as OTHER.....is life changing. Western approaches of Therapy such as Congnitive Therapy are life changing and can be VERY effective at getting one to question one's mind....one's thoughts....to reason through them. Which in essence is like becoming the watcher. But they do not question the overall concept of identity....of self. The ego. The mind as separate from self. Then reasons don't matter....it is the same solution to all thoughts, all phobias etc. The mind is the disease...not any specific thought. So the solution is always the same.....stay present. Stay NOW. I am so grateful the Mr. Tolle had the calling to write and publish this book.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 7, 2005

    Review of The Power of Now

    Review of The Power of Now: A Guide to Spiritual Enlightenment by Eckhart Tolle. 1999. ISBN: 1- 57731-480-8. Paperback, 235 pages. The Power of Now has been a #1 New York Times bestseller. An endorsement by Oprah Winfrey helped to increase sales, and over two million copies have been sold. The author, Eckhart Tolle, was born in Germany and educated at the Universities of London and Cambridge. He does not claim to be a member of any specific religion. He uses principles from Christianity and Buddhism, A Coarse in Miracles and The Bible. Tolle¿s message of the entire book appears in the title. The book is divided into ten chapters, plus the introduction. Tolle uses a question/answer format to anticipate reader reactions. From the beginning, Ekhart Tolle assures the readers that ¿You are here to enable the divine purpose of the universe to unfold. That is how important you are!¿ In chapter 1, Tolle states that ¿you are not your mind¿ and that the greatest obstacle to enlightenment is the mind. He claims that identifying with what¿s on our mind creates a barrier due to labels, images, and judgments that cross our consciousness. Tolle tells the reader to remember that ¿you are one with all this is.¿ In reference to this oneness, Tolle says that the mental movies complete with inner-voice soundtrack is a ¿result of all your past history as well as of the collective cultural mind-set you inherited.¿ Tolle encourages the reader to be in the here and now, to be alert and aware but not thinking, just like in meditation. He states that success with this practice can be measured by the degree of ¿peace that you feel within.¿ In order to achieve enlightenment, Tolle tells the reader to ¿rise above thought.¿ Simply ¿say yes to life, and see how life suddenly starts working.¿ In chapter 2, Tolle tells the reader how to recognize the ego, which feeds on external things, such as possessions and social status. Tolle ends the chapter by giving the reader a riddle: ¿Death is a stripping away of all that is not you. The secret to life is to die before you die, and find that there is no death.¿ The book cover states, ¿Tolle uses simple language.¿ The language may be simple, but the concept about the secret to life is complex. In other chapters, the principles are obvious: ¿The more you are focused on time, past and future, the more you miss the now.¿ Tolle gives the reader a powerful lesson on time: ¿Any lesson from the past becomes relevant and is applied now. Any planning as well as working toward achieving a particular goal is done now.¿ His book is a dichotomy of his beliefs: He tells readers to pause between chapters to mull over the concepts while telling us that our troubles arise because we think too much. He says we analyze too much, then tells us in chapter 4: ¿Make it a habit to monitor your mental-emotional state through self-observation.¿ Isn¿t that analyzing? Chapter 8 could cause controversy. Tolle says that ¿women are closer to enlightenment¿ than men because ¿it is easier for a woman to feel and be in her body.¿ Tolle dares to explore the menstrual cycles as painful due to the collective consciouness of being subjugated and exploited by men. Furthermore, Tolle states:¿The number of women who are now approaching the fully conscious state already exceeds that of men.¿ How is that measured? Many books are written about the power of the present (versus reflecting on the past and/or planning for the future) about embracing the journey (versus focusing on the destination) and about enjoying the process (versus focusing on the product.) O: The Oprah Magazine endorses that this book can ¿transform your thinking¿ bringing the reader ¿more joy, right now.¿ The point is made in the title: The Power of Now.

    4 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 30, 2009

    AWESOME

    This book is life changing. I literally stopped reading every few pages and found myself saying aloud, "WOW!"

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2007

    Everybody should read this book!!

    This book is an eye opener into yourself. Mainly your enter self. My eyes are open to why I may behave a certain in any given situation, and that's a wonderful feeling. It's a feeling of being alive, knowing why you do what you do. I own the 3DVD set and I listen to it just about everyday at work. I feel more and more alive everyday.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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