The Power of Positive Idiocy: A Collection of Rants and Raves [NOOK Book]

Overview

From David Feherty, the notorious  ex-pro and golf commentator at CBS Sports, comes a hilarious new collection of rants sure to surprise and crack up hackers everywhere.

In The Power of Positive Idiocy, readers will be treated to Feherty’s distinctive commentary on aging, Texas, women on the golf course, the Irish, parenting, addiction, Charles Barkley, and, of course, every pro golfer and golfing situation you’d ever want to read about....
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The Power of Positive Idiocy: A Collection of Rants and Raves

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Overview

From David Feherty, the notorious  ex-pro and golf commentator at CBS Sports, comes a hilarious new collection of rants sure to surprise and crack up hackers everywhere.

In The Power of Positive Idiocy, readers will be treated to Feherty’s distinctive commentary on aging, Texas, women on the golf course, the Irish, parenting, addiction, Charles Barkley, and, of course, every pro golfer and golfing situation you’d ever want to read about. He also graciously (or in some instances unforgivingly) answers his fans’ questions and passes on his unique and demented perspective. Don’t say you haven’t been warned . . .

Have you ever wondered where the weaknesses are in Tiger’s game? Or what would happen if there were PGA Tour cheerleaders? Or how Old Tom Morris would play if he came back from the dead? Or how you can raise the next Phil Mickelson? (Actually, Feherty acknowledges he could give a small dog’s trousers about your kids; he has trouble enough with his own.) Feherty explains how one can position oneself to caddie for a living. (Hint: The answer involves drugs, gambling, divorce, and a three-strike felony record.) And, of course, he dispenses the best advice for anyone new to the game of golf. (Hint: Proceed with caution here since this calls for a gun, $55,000, and a toothless, tattooed woman.)

Hilarious, perverse as ever, and totally uncensored, Feherty’s new collection is sure to put a smile on the grouchiest guy in your family.

From the Hardcover edition.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“David Feherty is a brilliant deranged soul. There are passages in this book that will make you swear that Hunter Thompson is alive and well.”—Carl Hiaasen

"Will bring about a cracked smile, even on your worst of days."--World Golf

“David has a wonderful and entertaining perspective not only on golf but on life. He reminds us not to take either too seriously.”—Jack Nicklaus
 
“"Feherty and the word, "idiot," are mutually inclusive." —Gary McCord

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780385530743
  • Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 4/6/2010
  • Sold by: Random House
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 240
  • Sales rank: 242,084
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

DAVID FEHERTY is a golf commentator for CBS Sports and a columnist for Golf magazine. He is the author of A Nasty Bit of Rough, Somewhere in Ireland a Village Is Missing an Idiot, An Idiot for All Seasons, and David Feherty’s Totally Subjective History of the Ryder Cup.

From the Hardcover edition.

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Read an Excerpt

Introduction

The author of perhaps the most famous self-help book ever written, The Power of Positive Thinking, was Norman Vincent Peale, a bigoted evangelical Protestant preacher who, when confronted with the imminent election of John F. Kennedy (a Roman Catholic) in 1960, declared, "Our culture is at stake," and openly worried that "our right to free speech may disappear." Maybe it's just me, but holy crap, that kind of thinking doesn't seem positive. Despite the obvious fact that he was a pious and hypocritical old fartbox, in 1984 NVP was awarded America's highest civilian honor, the Presidential Medal of Freedom, by, you guessed it, Ronald Reagan. I can only surmise that this honor was for another of his gifts to literature from 1957, the magnificently titled Stay Alive All Your Life. The stupid son of a bitch must have been Irish.

It's been several years since my last book was published, and almost three since I quit drinking, narcotics, and believing I was indestructible. I've also turned fifty and become addicted to road biking, which, in an irony I didn't find at all comforting, nearly killed me a lot faster than the alcohol and painkillers. What's more, it really hurt. The only way I would have found anything remotely amusing about the experience was if the truck that ran over me had been hauling alcohol and painkillers. Now, I don't care who you are, that would have been funny.

I don't expect this book will help anybody a whole lot, but then again, according to mental health professionals (then and now), neither did Positive Norman's. But you never know. Laughing, or even smiling, can be at least as effective as expensive therapy in banishing negativity from a person's thoughts. I wonder how many people are thinking positively when they are swallowing all their sleeping pills, attaching their larynxes to exhaust pipes, or teetering on some pigeon-stained ledge. I suppose they might be positive that they're going to die, but I'm not sure that's what Norman was trying to get across.

At the depth of my bout with addiction and depression, I too considered grabbing my own hat and assuming room temperature more than once, but there was always something or somebody who did something that made the part of me that was still alive giggle a little and take a step back up from the bottom of my amygdala, which is the landing that sits in the middle of the emotional stairwell of our brains. (I know that because I had a lot of expensive therapy.) Sometimes it was one of my children, or Anita, my beautiful and long-suffering wife, but more often than not, it was one of my dogs. All of my life, I've looked at dogs and imagined what they were thinking. Why do they look at me, embarrassed, when they are snapping one off on my lawn? Willard, my elderly Schnauzenweiner cross, will stop in midsqueeze and wait for me to lose interest before he'll continue. In one dog-shit psychology experiment I counted five or six rest rings in his offering, which coincided exactly with my glances in his direction. What the hell does he want—for me to look the other way and whistle, like there's nothing to see here? There most certainly is: Apparently, I can sculpt dog turds using only my mind. I don't know about you, but I bet Sigmund Freud would have been deeply impressed.

So there is less about golf in this book, and more about scat and other similar material, like life in general, which is just other people's scat when you think about it, which you positively shouldn't. That's the whole point—sorry, Norm—positively don't think. Just get on with whatever it is you're doing and pay attention to the present moment. If you can forget the past and disregard the future, you're right here right now, which is lucky, because right here, right now, is all you ever have. It's that simple.

You idiot.

From the Trade Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 31, 2011

    just subscribe to golf magazine

    Good stories, but most are articles from magazine.Should have read a little more before I purchased

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted July 3, 2011

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    Posted September 2, 2011

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    Posted June 30, 2011

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